1916 SMLE.303 British Lee Enfield Rifle.

OhioAstromech

Well-Known Member
I recently acquired a 1916 SMLE Lee Enfield Rifle and noticed how much it looked like the Jawa Blaster.
I do not want to destroy this rifle to convert it to the blaster but I would like to resin cast it so I can do the same.

What I need to know is, is there a way to create a RTV mold of the rifle without disassembly and without having the RTV flow into every nook and cranny of the rifle.

Any help will....Be HeLpFuL ?

Scot
 

Gigatron

Sr Member
First off, you're in luck, the SMLE is what was used for the blaster. The No. 1 Mk. III to be exact. There are some arguments as to whether or not the gun was converted by LFL or if they used a pre-existing smoke gun as developed by the armed forces.

As to the rest of your question, short answer - no.

Longer answer - You'll never be able to make a mold without the resin getting in every gap in the gun, unless you plug everything first with clay or something similar. And then, it may just be gunked up with clay instead of resin.

Your best bet is to disassemble the gun in to it's major components. The only part you really need to cast is the reciever. Everything (and I mean everything) else can be bought on ebay for dirt cheap. Make a cast of the reciever and buy replacement parts for everything else (stock, trigger assembly, bolt, magazine and barrel). This way, you can have your jawa blaster AND your SMLE.

Good luck.

-Fred
 

OhioAstromech

Well-Known Member
Thanks Fred,

To be exact my Enfield is an Australian made 1916 No. 1 LITHGOW SMLE III Cadet Issue.

Scot

Would you also happen to know what the can at the end of the barrel was taken from?
It looks like a funnel of some sort or a powder measure.
 

Blad

Sr Member
Use paper to fill larger holes or gaps, then use sulpher-free non-setting modelling putty (plastascene) to fill gaps.

After you're moulded you can remove any putty with acetone (nail varnish remover).

The action is tight anyway, so you shouldn't find many gaps. I remember the Mk. IV from my cadet days, very similar.




<div class='quotetop'>(OhioAstromech @ Jun 23 2006, 05:49 PM) [snapback]1266716[/snapback]</div>
Thanks Fred,

To be exact my Enfield is an Australian made 1916 No. 1 LITHGOW SMLE III Cadet Issue.

Scot

Would you also happen to know what the can at the end of the barrel was taken from?
It looks like a funnel of some sort or a powder measure.
[/b]
 

Jeeves

Well-Known Member
Yeah, good call - don't destroy that Lithgow. The Aussie rifles are some of the better-made Enfields out there. The machine work and the smoothness of the bolt is superior to most other military bolt actions I've seen.

:)

Raj
 

OhioAstromech

Well-Known Member
I posted questions about this on the Smelly (SMLE) Shooters Yahoo Group and they say the same thing.
Some of them were very vocal about even restoring it.

Nice gun and very accurate for a 90 year old rifle.

Scot
 

Gigatron

Sr Member
It's a british issue rifle grenade launcher cup, designed to attach to the end of the SMLE via 2 hooks on the adapter. The grenade cups pop up on ebay every now and then. Generally go about $100. There are replicas that show up as well for a little bit (not much, though) cheaper.

If you look at the front sight, there should be a cut-out on either side. The grenade cup adapter had two hooks that would hold the cup to the rifle.

There's a member here who used to make the adapter to attach the cup to the shortened barrel. Goes by MonCal if I remember correctly (it has been a while - along while, since I built my blaster), but don't quote me on that. But it doesn't hurt to contact him and ask.

Cadet issues are generally demilled rifles. Meaning, they once saw action but were deactivated for training. That could be a problem when it comes to disassembly. Mine was a parade issue. Means they deactivated it and painted it pretty colors. Since I couldn't get it apart, I had to cut mine down :(. But it had more valur to me as a jawa blaster than as a fruity painted rifle, so I did what had to be done.

-Fred
 

Gigatron

Sr Member
<div class='quotetop'>(OhioAstromech @ Jun 23 2006, 05:15 PM) [snapback]1266739[/snapback]</div>
Does it still shoot? :D
[/b]

Mine? No. As part of the deactivation process, they welded a rod down the barrel through the end of the reciever. The breech is still open, so I could put some display ammo in there, but it couldn't be slid forward. Meaning I'd have to keep the bolt pulled back if there were ammo in the breech.

Besides, I don't think I'd want to shoot a shortened rifle. The kickback would be diasterous.

-Fred
 
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