1:6th scale project-latex?

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by dropshipbob, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    So, I want to make a suit to fit a 1:6th scale figure. It's from a movie, and in the movie it was all one piece and appeared to be made of rubber.

    Now, I realize it doesn't have to be made the same way, but the more I think on it, it seems to be easiest to do it this way. So my question is, what would be the best way to mold and cast this?

    I planned to sculpt directly on a 1:6th figure using Sculpey or Super sculpey. Once this was done, bake as normal. I'm not sure what the mold would be made of, I asked Wampa and he said perhaps stone (plaster) but on something this small and detailed perhaps a silicone mold and then a urethane casting.

    This would probably have to be roto cast (probably using just my hands?)
    Is this possible? Is this a good idea considering it's probably the only way to get something that will fit as one piece?

    If you have any ideas or advice, please post. :)
     
  2. morpheus13

    morpheus13 Well-Known Member

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    I planned on sculpting the suit on a body, taking a mold of the whole thing and then doing a squish cast of rubber with a doll body. After you take it out of the mold, you would be left with the rubber being cast directly to the body. Some other details that need to be worked out like keeping the blank figure centered in the mold using bits of rubber etc but that is the basic idea.
     
  3. Gigatron

    Gigatron Sr Member

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    If you have no plans on removing the suit, I say dip your fig in Plasti-Dip. It's that rubber coating stuff used to put rubber grips on tools and the like. Once the ruber dries, you should be able to paint over it.

    Just a thought.

    -Fred
     
  4. Jimbo890

    Jimbo890 Well-Known Member

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    The 1960's vintage GIjOE scuba suits were made by taking a generic human form mold, the scal of Joe, and dipping it into liquid rubber, and allowing it to dry. then invert the rubber skin, and then sew a zipper on. Today, they make a tool handle material you simply dip the part in the can of goo, and a rubber skin is deposited on the tool. Once, dry, dip again, and again to get the thickness you want. That might get you what you want.
     
  5. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    O.k., I see what you all are saying. My problem with this is I have to sculpt the suit...and whatever material I sculpt the suit out of won't be something I'd want to leave on the figure. The sculpey would have to be baked to keep the detail, and if I do that, then the body under it won't be poseable.

    That's why I wanted to make a mold. So I could cast it in a useable form, like a little rubber suit. Plus I want to make copies to sell and recoop my costs.
     
  6. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    Oh, one more thing to clear up any confusion, this isn't a simple skin-tight diving type suit, this suit is full of detail.

    I guess I should just come out and say it, I want to make a stilsuit as worn by the Fremen in DUNE.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Gigatron

    Gigatron Sr Member

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    Here's a question. Assuming you manage to make this tiny rubber suit and make copies and sell them, how are people supposed to get them on their figures without them ripping. Rubber or silicone at that size is going to be thin and action figures aren't as flexible as a human body.

    Honestly, I think you should sculpt the detail on the body in sections (not covering any joints) then coat the body in plasti-dip and call it done. You'll have the detail and retain most of the flexability. The most money you'll be out is the cost of a can of plasti-dip (<$10). Make a tutorial for others to follow and you won't have to worry about casting or anything else. Or, offer a service to build them for people.

    -Fred
     
  8. Super Serg

    Super Serg Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't it be easier to have a seamstress create this suit out of faux rubber type material?

    Love the idea, btw.

    *ss*
     
  9. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    Good question.
    I was hoping to cast it using a strong latex that hopefully could be poured in thin amounts...I think there's a technical term for this, not sure what it is.

    Once the casting is removed, a thin cut down the back will help with the insertion of whatever figure is available. I'm also thinking of adding tiny zippers, or a simple series of small buttons to help keep it closed, but first I have to find out if the rest is even possible.

    I'm thinking this whole thing would be created in much the same manner as a Halloween mask...only with a thinner wall.
     
  10. Neon Sentry

    Neon Sentry Sr Member

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    Just use a two piece plaster mold and slush cast it in thinned soft grade latex... when it's done, cut it into multiple pieces (moreso at the joints than anything else) and glue or sew it to a one piece undersuit (I've seen them used before for similar apps for 1/6 scale figs). You'd get (most of) the surface detail and flexibility, but retain the durability you wanted

    Good luck.
     
  11. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    Super Serg, I would do that, but at this scale, I think it would drive any person who attempted it quite mad. I should know, I had a seamstress do this suit in 1:1 scale, and she said "never again". :)


    Neon sentry, thanks for the info. Where can I get this "soft grade latex", and what would I use to glue it to an undersuit?
     
  12. Neon Sentry

    Neon Sentry Sr Member

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    A lot of larger scale masks use a harder latex to keep it's shape. Batman cowls and the like are skin tight and are made of softer latex for comfort and flexibility. Any type of soft grade mask latex should work

    If I'm off on any of this, please chime in, I'm rather rusty
     
  13. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    Anyone else?
     
  14. dropshipbob

    dropshipbob Sr Member

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    I'd like to bump this one more time to gather any last bits of info anyone might have.
     
  15. Fizbin

    Fizbin Well-Known Member

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    Jimbob Wan is the man you seek, since he's one of the best sixth scale customizers I've ever encountered. He experiments with just about everything and has even dabbled in making a latex suit, as seen here: TEASER
    If he doesn't have an answer for you, than nobody will.

    Hope this helps. ;)
     

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