Woodchuck DC-15a and T-21 finishing tutorials?

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squirk

Sr Member
I bought both of these a long time ago, and it's high time I actually finish/paint the damn things.

Was wondering if there were any good tutorials on painting these to give them that worn metal look? My plan was to putty up any gaps, prime, paint a few coats of automotive silver paint, add top coat, paint a few coats of satin black, use fine sandpaper or plastic scouring pad to wear certain areas back down to the silver, and then top coat again.

I don't think it's a bad plan per se, but it seems pretty rudimentary. Are there any other resources that might guide me to better results?

Thanks much,
 

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squirk

Sr Member
Thanks for the tip. Did you ever find a good matte method to topcoat/seal the powder so it did not come off when handled? Did the Testors or Krylon suggestions work?

I don't expect to handle these props very often, but when I do, I'd prefer not to get messy doing so.
 

Mara Jade's Father

Master Member
I actually prefer to do as you said, silver undercoat, then black topcoat. Then I utilze automotive high grit sandpaper and steel wool to wear the in areas I want such as edges.

i utilize dry brushing as well especially in gouges but it is my preferred secondary technique. I usually finish the entire item with a black wash.

ive always wanted to try the graphite. I've had props painted by others that utilized it and it does look great.
 

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squirk

Sr Member
I was actually just wondering about the priming. Whenever I've primed wood in the past - even smooth, well-sanded wood - the grain is often still visible, even after several coats. Is there any special technique or product to mask the grain, or do I just need to apply a lot of thin primer coats?


I did an electronics kit for Woodchucks DC-17 blaster.... [ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jj58wl-aT0M ]

make sure you prime the wood first! :)

I'd also say do the reverse of what you posted.. do black first.. then do the silver (wither dry brushing, or some rub) on the 'high areas'
 

TazMan2000

Sr Member
Thanks for the tip. Did you ever find a good matte method to topcoat/seal the powder so it did not come off when handled? Did the Testors or Krylon suggestions work?

I don't expect to handle these props very often, but when I do, I'd prefer not to get messy doing so.
I haven't primed it yet, but I have to wait for warmer weather before I do. Yeah, the stuff comes off on your hands and clothes. Your fingers also ruin the coating because of the oils in the skin.

In regards to getting rid of the woodgrain, you may want to prime a few coats and sand in between coats.

TazMan2000
 

squirk

Sr Member
Hate to necro, but what do you all think about the coat in-between the silver and the black? I definitely don't mind scuffing up the black top coat to show the silver underneath, but I definitely don't want the silver to wear away to show the primer underneath. Enamel clear-coat? Matte? Semi?
 

Mara Jade's Father

Master Member
Here's the thing... How many layers are enough to prevent that from happening? You cannot guarantee that extra layer is going to be enough? Do you add another and another? That is one of downsides of faux finishing because there is always possible that from wear or accident, the undersurface will be revealed.

My advice is this, if you are concerned about primer showing, use black primer (probably too late for that). My next suggestion, if you are going to add another layer, why not just do another silver coat? I'd save the clear coat for the end.

If you have any wear afterwards exposing the primer or wood, you can just do a little touchup with a brush.

That's my advice... for what it's worth.


BTW: Back to the original issue of woodgrain. I was wondering if anyone tried using XTC 3D High Performance 3D Print Coating on wood?
 

squirk

Sr Member
Much appreciated. The reality is that this will likely see no actual wear at all. It will probably sit on display in my man-cave, and be handled very infrequently. So, I guess I am fretting about nothing. Still, I always like to do things right the first time. Thanks again!
 

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tubachris85x

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I've painted quite a few of WoodChuck's weapons for commissions, to include both the long and shorty. Actually about to do another one of his long rifles for a local member.

While my method may not be the "best," I feel it works pretty well. The biggest hurdle is getting that wood grain to be as minimally visible as possible. I'll hit ever spot with steel wool and HIGH grit sand paper. until I get the few rough patches smooth enough. Filler work if necessary though, I never had to do much..just very small crevices...

My order of painting goes:
Using Valspar, I've come to like this as a spray paint, over using krylon or rustolieum, though I used Testor's for the lower-mounted scope

- Flat black base coat, a 2nd thin coat if needed
- Then hit it with 2 coats of Brushed Nickel
(option to use masking if desired at this stage)

- Then will do 1-2 HEAVY coats of Satin Black.

I say heavy as this aides in concealing the wood-grain, and I've gotten decent results.

For weathering, I've toned it down for the long rifle, but use a mix of acrylics, browns-blacks mixed sometimes others. I used dry-brushed silver for the edge-weathering. Takes a LONG time, but can have good results. After dry brushing the silver, I go over it with the grime.

It's pretty straight forward, but that's how I do it




 

xl97

Sr Member
I've worked on a DC-17 before.. (actually made this electronics kit for it)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jj58wl-aT0M



IMHO. ..

* primer the base wood gun (this is to seal/cover the wood grain texture from coming through)

* a coat of the black (gloss, flat, satin..whatever you like) to cover the whole thing nicely..

* the 'dry-brush' (exactly like it sounds.. take a dry brush touch the end with some silver, dray it off on some scrap paper so you have VERY VERY VERY little on the brush.. and hit the edges, high spots of the gun body)

if still to 'clean' looking, look into taking a black 'wash' and lightly touching it spots where grit and dirt might not get out of on a norm rub/clean..
 

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