Star Trek: Questions you always wanted answers to

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Lost in Trek

Sr Member
Well, according to the makers of the television show called Star Trek: Discovery, the inside of a Federaton starship, around the time of TOS, is like Willie Wonka’s chocolate factory, with HUGE open spaces and rollercoaster tracks for the turbo elevators—or, in this case, “Starfleet Wonkavators”—to endlessly roll around on.

View attachment 1360040

I liked this short trek but hated that design decision.
 

Zombie_61

Master Member
Well, according to the makers of the television show called Star Trek: Discovery, the inside of a Federaton starship, around the time of TOS, is like Willie Wonka’s chocolate factory, with HUGE open spaces and rollercoaster tracks for the turbo elevators—or, in this case, “Starfleet Wonkavators”—to endlessly roll around on.

View attachment 1360040
And they're completely wrong. Even in TOS almost everything on Enterprise operated by using energy--propulsion, weapons, shields, transporters, you name it. So why would the Turbolifts be restrained by roller-coaster-like tracks? Because the people responsible for producing STD are from generations that were very different from Gene Roddenberry's era. Roddenberry was a bit of a visionary, imagining a far more idealistic future than we've ever actually known, and that included future technology. That's why ALL of Trek's technology was at least one or two steps ahead of what we were familiar with in the 1960s; Roddenberry was projecting into the 2260s. By that time I think it would be safe to assume roller-coaster tracks will be obsolete technology. But the people responsible for STD clearly don't think that way; they're stuck in the early-21st Century and can't see beyond that.

I always thought they dropped the ball by having Turbolifts in the first place; the "elevators" should have operated on the same technology as the transporters. Step into the chamber, say "Deck 7, Section B", and you're beamed there automatically. Done. No tracks, no empty spaces between walls and decks, just chambers on every deck adjacent to where people need to be.
 

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patrickivan

Sr Member
The JJ Enterprise engine room looks like a brewery, does that count? :p

As someone who loves both Star Trek, and brewing wonderful tasty Beers, I've changed my mind about JJPrise's Engineering. I don't know why I never considered the novelty of combining the two. I love it now.

Enterprising Stouts
USS Dunkelweisen
NCC-1701-Ale
United Federation of Lagers


****, all the great names for my upcoming Beers!
 

Sluis Van Shipyards

Legendary Member
I watched Generations again the other day. When Geordi is captured by the Klingons why does the hacked feed from his visor look like perfectly clear video? We've seen how he sees through his visor and it's nothing like that.
 

Lightning

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I watched Generations again the other day. When Geordi is captured by the Klingons why does the hacked feed from his visor look like perfectly clear video? We've seen how he sees through his visor and it's nothing like that.

No reason the Klingons wouldn't have deliberately isolated just visible light to transmit out. It would use less bandwidth anyway and a smaller signal would be harder to detect.
 

Strikerkc

Sr Member
Plus, I think part of the reason he saw things that way, wasn't because the visor couldn't record video, it's because of how the interface with his mind worked. There were plenty of times he had problems because he could only see the "weird" version the visor pumped into his temples.
 

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RedheadKevin

Active Member
I thought his visor had multi-spectrum capability. He can see X-Ray, IR, UV, visible, and all kinds of other energy wavelengths. I'd guess "4K video" would be one of those modes.
 

Strikerkc

Sr Member
Many plot lines revolved around the fact that Geordie could NOT see normally through the visor.

The whole point of the character is that he had a real functional disability, but even though he functioned DIFFERENTLY than others (the heat vision, x rays, etc) he was still very successful and a key member of the crew in his own right.

You even get to see the first time Geordie has ever SEEN what the world looks like to others, when Q tries to tempt him with functioning vision. he's blown away, it's beautiful to him, and he passes on it, because he won't abandon his crewmates to Q's whims.

Could the visor capture real video? likely, almost assuredly. could it transfer that image into Geordie's mind through the temple ports? No.
 

RedheadKevin

Active Member
I forgot that he couldn't see the visible spectrum with the visor, and that it was specifically brought up in the show. That being said, maybe he got a new visor for Generations?
You even get to see the first time Geordie has ever SEEN what the world looks like to others, when Q tries to tempt him with functioning vision. he's blown away, it's beautiful to him, and he passes on it, because he won't abandon his crewmates to Q's whims.
It's like when people try those anti-colorblindness glasses. Those videos always blow my mind.
 

Strikerkc

Sr Member
Now, as for what his cyber eyes do once he shows up with those out of nowhere in one of the movies, I've got no clue; I think that's just them trying to distance the character from the look of the visor; it's very 1980's. lol
 

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Lightning

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I forgot that he couldn't see the visible spectrum with the visor, and that it was specifically brought up in the show. That being said, maybe he got a new visor for Generations?

In Insurrection we learn Geordi had never seen a (visible light) sunset before. For whatever reason he can't isolate the frequencies sent to his brain. That must be a hardware limitation. But the visor must be able to send visible light to him, otherwise he wouldn't be able to read computer screens. He just sees everything else at the same time as well.

The view we get through his implants in First Contact looks much more normal and has mode selection (infrared on command, if I remember correctly). Definitely a upgrade in functionality as well as aesthetics.
 

Zombie_61

Master Member
Now, as for what his cyber eyes do once he shows up with those out of nowhere in one of the movies, I've got no clue; I think that's just them trying to distance the character from the look of the visor; it's very 1980's. lol
LeVar Burton had been asking the production staff to somehow get rid of that visor almost from the beginning of TNG because it hid his eyes. That's why Geordi always seemed so animated--Mr. Burton couldn't use his eyes to express himself, so he had to rely on gestures. Surely everyone involved in such a change knew they wouldn't be making many more movies, so they finally granted Mr. Burton's request.
 

somerset fox

Well-Known Member
“Captain, we’re approaching the planet”, “bring us out of warp”. Seeing as the ship would be travelling at many times the speed of light, surely by the time the helmsperson responds and drops out of warp, many millions of miles will have past And the planet receding in the distance!
 

renaissance_man

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
“Captain, we’re approaching the planet”, “bring us out of warp”. Seeing as the ship would be travelling at many times the speed of light, surely by the time the helmsperson responds and drops out of warp, many millions of miles will have past And the planet receding in the distance!
Three words.
Long range sensors.
When a helms person is saying "we are approaching the planet" they wouldnt be saying that at the point where there are seconds to spare to disengage the warp drive and slow to impulse before hurtling passed it. These are highly trained professionals... well maybe not in Kurtzman Treck.
 

Treadwell

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Even so, it would not be done manually, because doing it even a second too soon would have them way too far from the destination. The dialogue should be more along the lines of notifying the captain that the ship would be taking ITSELF out of warp soon.
 

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