Recreating a Ranger Sequoia from F:NV and I need tips on the cylinder.

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Sammukai

New Member
FRIEND TYPE THIS OUT FOR ME THANKS PLS REPLY SO I CAN READ :D

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Okay, so, I bought a 3D printed kit that was designed by the same guy who sold it to me. It's a really amazing recreation of a Ranger Sequoia. The print quality is high and there isn't much I have to dislike. There's a few structural things like exposed areas, but I was going to coat it in some stuff to smooth it out and fill the printing gaps anyway, not that there are many of those that can be felt.

The cylinder can roll in the gun as is. I haven't glued anything together yet, so I can still work with it all. Basically, I'm looking for a way to get the barrel to pop out on the side. There's a rod that holds it in the body of the gun after you put the two pieces of it together. The trigger, like the hammer, is static. That's not a huge deal to me. The main thing that I would like is for the barrel to be able to pop out so I can "load" it with some bullets that may just have to be custom and possibly printed?

There would be enough room in the back of the body around where the hammer is to dremel out some area and work something out, but the front doesn't have any extra material there to take out and work with.

Is there some kind of special hinge? I want this to be a realistic pop out so I can use it in a fan film I'm going to make in a while with the rest of my props.

Also, do you guys have any tips on how to paint the engravings in gold? Some of it is pretty small, even for a tooth pick. I'm planning on priming the whole thing in silver and then dry brushing black maybe. The grip will have a natural underlying color after a bit of sanding to create some fake wood feeling, and then it will be stained with the bear being painted later.
 
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nomuse

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hrm. I did a little reading up. According to the IMFDB, the Sequoia is based on a Magnum Research BFR that uses a loading gate. A quick image search didn't turn up any decent views of the left side of any replicas or anything else with a good view of the crane the Sequoia has. I'd say the in-game model would come closest to figuring out what part of the frame "slices out" to make the crane. Doesn't seem like an easy task on the (nicely detailed) 3d model you've got, but doesn't seem impossible either.

I'd very much use metal pins when you get that far, though. In fact, metal-on-metal; seat a metal tube into the pivot and glue it down well, then fit a metal rod into that to make a smooth pivot.

Or...here's a crazy thought...since amateur video makers are getting really good with animating muzzle flash and even blowback on top of real footage, perhaps you could accomplish a basic reloading animation with the same video trickery?
 

Sammukai

New Member
Hrm. I did a little reading up. According to the IMFDB, the Sequoia is based on a Magnum Research BFR that uses a loading gate. A quick image search didn't turn up any decent views of the left side of any replicas or anything else with a good view of the crane the Sequoia has. I'd say the in-game model would come closest to figuring out what part of the frame "slices out" to make the crane. Doesn't seem like an easy task on the (nicely detailed) 3d model you've got, but doesn't seem impossible either.

I'd very much use metal pins when you get that far, though. In fact, metal-on-metal; seat a metal tube into the pivot and glue it down well, then fit a metal rod into that to make a smooth pivot.

Or...here's a crazy thought...since amateur video makers are getting really good with animating muzzle flash and even blowback on top of real footage, perhaps you could accomplish a basic reloading animation with the same video trickery?
Yeah, but it's not the same fun factor. Much more fun to actually pop out the barrel and not have to pretend to.

I'll check out some of the stuff you said about getting it to pop out, thanks!
 

nomuse

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I talked about it at lunch yesterday and seems like the lower part of the crane can be a simple pivot. Real guns can get quite complex in how the crane is held in place when the gun is in firing arrangement, but often the cylinder pin is the key. Which seems like it wouldn't be that complex to achieve; cylinder pin trapped and sprung, passing through crane, all the way through the cylinder, and sticks into a hole in the rear of the frame. So all you have to do is pull it forwards a bit to pull the pin out of the frame and then tilt cylinder and crane out on the crane's pivot pin.

Probably easier to explain in a diagram!
 

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