Painting Tips

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Wingsta96

New Member
Ok so I have been reading this wonderful forum for a while as I am very new to the modeling world (although long time Star Wars fan). I have purchased the De Agostini Millennium Falcon but before I start putting it together and have to repaint I need to find more info on weathering techniques for Star Wars models.

I have looked up info on Acrylic wash techniques and dry brushing but I'm not sure on what's the best way and there isn't alot of videos I have found being able to watch people weather Star Wars props. I bought a cheap Jedi remote, Thermal Detonator, Revell AT-AT Walker and a 31inch Hasbro X-wing which I would like to practice on first.

I have the red, light grey squares and off white base sprayed for the Jedi Remote as example but I'm not sure the best way to weather the remote with the rust spots and a black wash for overall weathering on the whole prop. Same for the AT-AT, X-Wing and so forth. If anyone can share some tips or can point me to some videos on the best ways to weather for Star Wars models I would be forever grateful.
 
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JMChladek

Sr Member
The first thing to keep in mind is there isn't necessarily a "best" technique for everything. As modelers, we each come up with our own individual take on traditional techniques to do what we need. What works for one modeler may not work for others as it can depend on the supplies available. That being said, washes and drybrushing are pretty close to universal. My advice for doing them is to practice, practice, practice. A cheap Star Wars model with a lot of surface relief is a good place to start, something with a nice combination of recesses and raised areas. Just don't spend too much as it is intended to be a practice model. So if it doesn't turn out right, you aren't out a lot of money.

With a wash, you can practice with thinning ratios to see how it works. Black paint can obviously give the most stark contrast, but often you don't need to go that dark as it results in models looking too much like oversized gaming miniatures IMHO. So I typically use gray shades for my washes and in a few cases, transparent tint paints since while they have pigment in them, they don't have opaquing agents. So the base color still shows through the wash paint. Just be aware if you do washes with acrylics that you will likely need to add a drop of liquid soap to your wash water to break the surface tension, or else the droplets can bead up on a painted surface like rain on a freshly waxed car.

Drybrushing is pretty easy. Just make sure if you use a relatively new paintbrush to do it that it likely won't be good for much else as dried paint can wreck the bristles. Enamels work well for drybrushing, better than acrylics IMHO since acrylics can sometimes ball up on the brush bristles. But, acrylics can still be used if that is all you have available.
 

Wingsta96

New Member
Hi JMChladek,
Thank you so much for the info. Is it better to do a large area wash as a water wash? Then small details like the rust spots as dry brushing?

The other question I have is do you layer the water washes or do you just do one water wash with the grey then dry brush the rest of the details like the rust and streaks?

I really appreciate the help.
 

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Wingsta96

New Member
Hi guys thanks so much it was so helpful to see it in a video like that. I sitll am not sure which one to use for what model but I guess that's the experimenting part for me.

One question if you do a wash with 502 Abteilung oil colors would I have to use to wash it down with thinner or can I use water? I know that might seem like a silly question but I haven't tried it as yet.
 

swgeek

Sr Member
One question if you do a wash with 502 Abteilung oil colors would I have to use to wash it down with thinner or can I use water? I know that might seem like a silly question but I haven't tried it as yet.
Yes, you have to use a thinner. Mineral spirits work, or an artists oil thinner, a bit more color stable.
 

Wingsta96

New Member
Thanks swgeek so mix a tub half and half? Or get a cup of thinner and dip the brush in a cup of thinner? Also do you wipe up the excess with a rag or a clean brush?
Arghh sorry for asking so many annoying questions.
 

swgeek

Sr Member
There's no set ratio really, it depends on what effect you are trying to achieve. Best thing I can say is try different mixes and see what you like. As far as the excess goes, I usually use a clean brush or a clean brush with solvent. But again, you can always try something else and see what works, might find something that gives you the exact effect you are looking for. And the questions aren't annoying, that's what we're all here for.
 

Wingsta96

New Member
Thanks so much for the advice I really appreciate it. I saw Lasse moping up the excess with a brush so I will try that. Might give it a go on my Jedi training remote this week :)
 

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