Need help with a build

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maxwyght

New Member
So I'm considering making my first armor build(specifically Iron Man, even specificier? Mk 42, though I'm hoping to find mk45 pep files before I'll start building the armor)

Anyways, what I camw here for isn't the armor itself(though I'd love to get input on that too in time), but the underlying infrastructure.

more specifically;
A cooling solution.
The minute I told my friends I'll be going as Iron man to the civil war premier(T minus 9 months, we already have cap and bucky in our line up), I started reading up on armor builds, and the thing that struck me was that it's going to get mighty hot in that suit(especially in Israel, where summer starts around mid april, though the last three years were pretty chilly(~28 degrees celsius)).
So I started looking around, and in another forum they pointed me here saying you guys may be able to help.

So being lazy, I'll copy paste that post here:
QUOTE=maxwyght;4986689]LCVG stands for "liquid cooling and ventilation garment", and this is basically astronaut underwear.

Why I need help with this?
I want to make my first armor cosplay(an iron man suit, featuring a crap ton of bells whistles and animatronics for the civil war premier(approx 10 months)), and being the boyscout that I am(figuratively. I just like being prepared), I looked around, and alot of people enjoy the lovely effects of heat exhaustion.
And that's in closed aced enviornments.

An armor with no cooling would probably get to around 45-50 degrees celsius, which is utterly uncomfortable(not to mention dangerous).
I was looking around the web, and all I got were either air cooling solutions(which will be ineffective in a confined space), or off the shelf cooling vests(which are a bandaid instead of a solution).

Inspiration struck me as I was cleaning my watercooled computer, which doesn't have a lot of airflow, but seeing as it's waterxooled, it doesn't need it.
And I though to myself:
"Hmm... If astronauts and computers can use an LCVG, why not me?"

So I started looking around for something like that, but to no avail.

I did come upon something called coolshirt, a company which makes LCVGs for a bunch of stuff(and RDJ possibly wore one under his armor when he wasn't a CGI robot), but it's bulky, and I don't have the luxury of being connected to a generator and a large pump.
I'm hoping to make a self contained unit that won't add too much bulk.

What I came up with is to sew on a crap top of 6mm tubing(outer diameter of 9mm), and connect it to custom reservoirs and.pumps, with 80mm radiators and fans for the heat exchange unit.
The problem is, I'll have at best 3 litres of water/coolant in the system, while the smallest/weakest pump I found has a speed of 120litres per hour(meaning it would probably recycle the entire volume of coolant in 1.5 minutes or less).

I don't actually need help building the thing, since I have the design in my head/roughly on paper, just need help with figuring if the self contained unit will be able to keep me cool with that speed(I don't need the suit to be 20 degrees or something. 25~30 degrees will be more than fine, heck, anythinf below 36 degrees could be considered a success).

So what do you guys think?
Figure that pump speed is slow enough for keeping cool?

P.S.
I believe with the right equipment I could control the RPM to slow it down, but that will be a last second update if I finish the rest of the build.[/QUOTE]

doing some rough calculations, I believe with the right scale, I'll have approximately 4 inches of clearence from my chest to the inner part of the suit, possibly even more if I'll use the fiberglassed pep as a moould for some thinner material.
 

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Sentry02

Active Member
Your biggest enemy will likely be dehydration. As a former Division I mascot, I can tell you that for sure. I used to wear a camelbak bladder under my costume to make sure I stayed hydrated and I could stay in the rig for several hours with little issue. Are you still hot? Yes, but I wonder if that shirt setup will provide the required offset with the additional weight in a hot environment. In other words, I would be concerned that it wouldn't do enough for you. I am currently building a Mk III and intend on having a Camelbak installed in it for longer troops. Instead of trying to avoid the sweating (which may not be possible), you may want to consider keeping yourself hydrated. Just a thought.
 

maxwyght

New Member
Your biggest enemy will likely be dehydration. As a former Division I mascot, I can tell you that for sure. I used to wear a camelbak bladder under my costume to make sure I stayed hydrated and I could stay in the rig for several hours with little issue. Are you still hot? Yes, but I wonder if that shirt setup will provide the required offset with the additional weight in a hot environment. In other words, I would be concerned that it wouldn't do enough for you. I am currently building a Mk III and intend on having a Camelbak installed in it for longer troops. Instead of trying to avoid the sweating (which may not be possible), you may want to consider keeping yourself hydrated. Just a thought.
My main issue isn't the sweat, but the heat exhaustion.
I don't sweat much, which is why I don't go outside much(or at all once temperatures his 30+ degrees), and when I do, I limit exposure as little as possible, and once I get back inside my house, i turn the ac on and pour a bucket of water on myself and let the cool air slowly evaporate the water off me.

The weight shouldn't be more than 15~18 kilograms for the entire rig(armor included), unless I miscalculated the weight of fiberglass).
 

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