Metallic finish on latex?

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Drakon58

New Member
Hey all, currently working on sculpting a Solitaire mask from warhammer 40k. I'd like to try making some latex copies in addition to resin ones, and was wondering if there was a way I could do metallic coloration for the horns and mask border?

Could I add something like mica powder to a thinned out mask latex or something like flex gloss top coat and put it through an external mix airbrush? I'd figure It would be best to avoid using a hand brush to do the application given the possibility of uneven coverage.

I've also seen a few tutorials where people were making latex filigree using a silicone mold dusted with metallic pigments such as mica powder, copper powder etc, but that seemed to have been done using some sort of thick paste like latex that came out of a tube.

For sure I know it's possible to achieve a metallic like coloration as there's a maker who has done a number of beautiful theater style masks:

Atelier Pirate

Ref
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Mr Mold Maker

Master Member
You can mix metal powder or metallic oil paints with rubber cement, thin with Naptha and airbrush a few coats on.

Another way which may be a little less durable, but easier and much less toxic, would be to hand paint Jacquard Lumiere paint on. It has a good bit of flex, but it is an acrylic paint so if you flex the piece a little too much you could get some cracking. Same goes for Skin Illustrators silver airbrush makeup paint.
 

Drakon58

New Member
Thanks for the advice,

I'll def check out Jacquard Lumiere since that seems fairly accessible up here in Canada.

I've gotten similar recommendations for Rub-n-Buf as well. A friend of mine said to apply it over top latex that's been mixed with metallic powders so you have the bright sheen of a metal while providing an acceptable transition as wear and tear digs into the material over time.

Hopefully both your recommendations will be seal-able with either acrylic gloss coat or flex-gloss from Monster Makers.
 

udog

Active Member
I´ve used (years ago) xylene and metalic powder to get a metallic appearance- Very toxic and odorous. Not for big coverage, just touch ups.
 

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vader45

Sr Member
I wouldn't recommend anything with oil on latex. Latex being a natural material the oil would make it rot sooner and faster.
 

vader45

Sr Member
Oil paints mixed with rubber cement has been a very popular way to paint masks for literally decades. One still used today by many.

What is the average life span of these pieces that use oil paints?

I always hear of liquid latex mixed with watered down acrylic paints. Oil has always been known to be an enemy of latex.
 

Mr Mold Maker

Master Member
What is the average life span of these pieces that use oil paints?

What is the average lifespan of any latex piece?
That depends entirely on care, storage, the quality of latex, etc etc. There is no way to quantify how much oil paints affect the lifespan, it at all, because there is no way to accurately predict the lifespan of a mask.

Anecdotally, I have had masks that are 40+ years old painted with Rubber cement paints (RCP) that are just fine. Old Don Post and Distortion masks were painted with RCP, though Distortions now uses the latex method.


Latex paints are fine, however they can be prone to yellowing and peeling. I would prefer PAX (Prosaide and Acrylic) over Latex paints in almost every case. If the OP happens to be concerned, he could mix Prosaide with metallic powders instead.

Go to the latex mask central and ask the old timers there what they prefer, and I bet you’ll have more folks than not that swear by the rubber cement and oils.(y)
 
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udog

Active Member
I always hear of liquid latex mixed with watered down acrylic paints.
Now that I remember, we have also mixed latex with acrylic metalic paints (50/50). But the finish is dull, at least with the paints we used. Maybe using it as a base could be ineteresting anyway.
 

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Drakon58

New Member
What is the average lifespan of any latex piece?
That depends entirely on care, storage, the quality of latex, etc etc. There is no way to quantify how much oil paints affect the lifespan, it at all, because there is no way to accurately predict the lifespan of a mask.

Anecdotally, I have had masks that are 40+ years old painted with Rubber cement paints (RCP) that are just fine. Old Don Post and Distortion masks were painted with RCP, though Distortions now uses the latex method.


Latex paints are fine, however they can be prone to yellowing and peeling. I would prefer PAX (Prosaide and Acrylic) over Latex paints in almost every case. If the OP happens to be concerned, he could mix Prosaide with metallic powders instead.

Go to the latex mask central and ask the old timers there what they prefer, and I bet you’ll have more folks than not that swear by the rubber cement and oils.(y)

Prosaid, certainly another option I hadn't thought of. Does it tend to dry out matte or shiny?
 

Scatterbrains

New Member
You can mix metal powder or metallic oil paints with rubber cement, thin with Naptha and airbrush a few coats on.

Another way which may be a little less durable, but easier and much less toxic, would be to hand paint Jacquard Lumiere paint on. It has a good bit of flex, but it is an acrylic paint so if you flex the piece a little too much you could get some cracking. Same goes for Skin Illustrators silver airbrush makeup paint.
Can you use a paintbrush?
 

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