Heros, Stunts and Greeblies

Boba Fettish

New Member
So as a new guy to this stuff, and not a Star Wars geek, I see the terms Hero, Stunt and Greeblie associated with sabers and blaster and such and haven't found a easy list of definitions.

Could someone explain these for me?

Todd
 

Triin

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hero is defined by a detailed prop they would use for a camera close up. Stunt would be a prop that is made to do the main “work” of the action. This could be rubberized weaponry ( safe to use during stunt sequences) or with Star Wars, a saber or blaster made to take a beating during action sequences. A greeblie is simply an added detail to a prop to make it look unique. Greeblies can be all sorts of things and doesn’t really describe one thing.
 

Boba Fettish

New Member
Hero is defined by a detailed prop they would use for a camera close up. Stunt would be a prop that is made to do the main “work” of the action. This could be rubberized weaponry ( safe to use during stunt sequences) or with Star Wars, a saber or blaster made to take a beating during action sequences. A greeblie is simply an added detail to a prop to make it look unique. Greeblies can be all sorts of things and doesn’t really describe one thing.
thank you. That makes a lot of sense. Is there any other "category" I'm missing or are these the basics?
 

Triin

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Not really. Unless you are wanting specific information or knowledge. I can elaborate, but generally, that about covers it :)
 

thd9791

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Welcome! I have some more detailed explanation to add.

With sabers, (I'm not sure which ones you're familiar with) many times the hero can't function as a "stunt" prop. They needed rods to be installed into the handles for fighting, and with lightsabers like Obi Wan's from A New Hope, or Luke's Graflex... they needed to be either modified or have a whole different prop made to do the fighting.

With other things like blasters, yea, a stunt might be something worn in your holster because you have to jump around set and a steel gun in your holster might make that dangerous.

Greeblies.... I think George Lucas or someone in the ILM model shop coined the term... its little bits of interesting stuff added to props and models. It was a famous trick they were well known for... take a basic object or model, cover it with model kit parts or hardware and paint the whole thing. It worked wonderfully and made some pretty iconic models. Usually used universally for smaller bits.. like that black box greeblie on Vader's saber from return of the jedi that we haven't identified in 39 years!!!! ugh.. anyway, greeblies can be stressful lol
 

DamnYankee123

New Member
If you have the time you should really check out “Light and Magic” on the Disney channel. Quite a lot of interviews and commentary from some of the original creators, artists, effects makers, prop builders, etc.

Also some good info on the etymology of the term greeblie and it’s derivatives greeble and nurnie here:


and here:

 

TazMan2000

Master Member
There is also the terms, "Studio Scale" which means to some, an exact copy of the studio miniature, using the same kitbashed pieces, of the models that were made from the same exact moulds, however some define it as the props/models that are built to the same scale as the originals. Also "toed in" is also an item you may hear referring to the mandibles of the several studio scale Millennium Falcons that were built.

Don't bring up the abovementioned terms unless you want to fight a battle that nobody will win. :p

stir-mike-united-burn.gif


TazMan2000
 

AtomicToybox

New Member
Lucas is frequently given credit for coining the word "greeblies" but as the articles DamnYankee123 posted document, the term (and the synonyms "nurnies" or "wiggits") was already in common use well before production of Star Wars began. I will note that Star Wars is unquestionably responsible for the term coming into widespread usage outside film production teams - I know my own first encounter with "greeblies" was in one of the original trilogy sketchbooks which published concept design sketches of the various models and props used in the films. Those drawings included occasional notes (by Lucas or others) suggesting changes to the designs, and at least one had the direction "add more greeblies."
 

jkno

Master Member
Hero Stormtrooper E-11 ANH Blaster replica with genuine greeblies aka parts (M38 Sherman scope, Eagle Hengstler counter etc.):

Sterling Stormtrooper Blaster 73.jpg



Stunt Stormtrooper E-11 ESB (& ROTJ) resin Blaster replica:

RS Pugman ESB Stunt Stormtrooper blaster 19.jpg



You can easily see the differences between the two blasters, and understand what Hero and Stunt means, after reading what other members posted above.
 

roygilsing

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hi Todd, and welcome here! When you have some time you should check out the lightsaber guide (sticky in the SW costumes and props):
On page 5 there's a "GLOSSARY OF COMMON TERMS" that can help.
Cheers,
Roy
 

joberg

Master Member
Lucas is frequently given credit for coining the word "greeblies" but as the articles DamnYankee123 posted document, the term (and the synonyms "nurnies" or "wiggits") was already in common use well before production of Star Wars began. I will note that Star Wars is unquestionably responsible for the term coming into widespread usage outside film production teams - I know my own first encounter with "greeblies" was in one of the original trilogy sketchbooks which published concept design sketches of the various models and props used in the films. Those drawings included occasional notes (by Lucas or others) suggesting changes to the designs, and at least one had the direction "add more greeblies."
Indeed; the model/prop makers in the U.K. are using the "wiggits" more often than nurnies/greeblies.
As for the terms "Hero" vs "Stunt" it's applied to costumes as well; some will be showed with tight close-up (hero costume with all the details and quality fabric present) while a stunt might be transformed to allow actors or stuntman/woman to be able to make some movements/wire work more easily. ;) And welcome to the RPF and the wonderful world of model/sculpture/prop/costume making(y)
 

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