Heat Gun on Paint?

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Darth Kahnt

Sr Member
I bought a heat gun tonight to help dry the paint on my props in a shorter period of time. Does anyone have any experiences to share (good or bad) from using a heat gun on their painted props?

I am looking to get an idea of whether it is appropriate for use on props because it is designed for household use.
 

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MaulWalker

Sr Member
Originally posted by DarthKahnt@Jan 14 2006, 02:23 AM
I bought a heat gun tonight to help dry the paint on my props in a shorter period of time. Does anyone have any experiences to share (good or bad) from using a heat gun on their painted props?

I am looking to get an idea of whether it is appropriate for use on props because it is designed for household use.
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Typically, heat guns are used to remove paint. They generate high temps that will bubble paint. I have used one to remove 18 coats of paint from 140 year old wood work. You would be better off with a blow drier. That is what the paint guys at Lowes and Home Depot use to quickly dry custom paint swatches.
 

mez7

Sr Member
yeah, heat gun will produce too much heat, use a hair dryer at low heat, move it constantly, slowly, and should work alright,

ive done it on the rare occasion that i needed something dry fast,
 

altername

Well-Known Member
Is a heat gun appropriate for bending plastic?

Originally posted by mez7@Jan 14 2006, 11:27 AM
yeah, heat gun will produce too much heat, use a hair dryer at low heat, move it constantly, slowly, and should work alright,

ive done it on the rare occasion that i needed something dry fast,
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BlindSquirrel

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Oh Yeah. It's what I call my "poor man's vacu-former".. :D

Get some thick gloves, super heat it until the plastic is floppy and stretch it over something of similar shape. With a little practice, you'll be amazed what you can build.
 

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Gilmortar

Sr Member
Hmm...really what I do, and have done on props big and small...put my stove on Preheat at 150*...
and paint something, and then set it in there
its not too hot and it definitely brings good results.
 

Darth Kahnt

Sr Member
Originally posted by LittleOleBountyHunter@Jan 14 2006, 06:02 PM
Hmm...really what I do, and have done on props big and small...put my stove on Preheat at 150*...
and paint something, and then set it in there
its not too hot and it definitely brings good results.
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I'm sure the heat gun will serve some purposes over the years, I only paid $13 for it so you can't go wrong. Hey, I guess I can always use it to shrinkwrap stuff if need be.... :)
 

neophyl

Well-Known Member
Remember heat is also a function of distance too. You can use a hot air gun for drying paint. Normally I use mine for heatshrinking electrical joints but its been so cold in the workshop recently that the paint on my current project hasnt been drying at all. IF you stand further away from the item then it works pretty much like a normal hairdryer. You just have to be a little more careful is all.
 

Skaught

Sr Member
To dry something, I'd just put a non-heated fan on it. Like a small circular fan. Just be sure it's not in a dusty environment or you'll blow dust into the paint. Sometimes it's just better to let nature takes its course.

Scott
 

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