Doctor Who opinions

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I was just saying they didn't pull the tardis out of thin air for the new years show is all.
Yeah, I was tracking that the spare came from the season finale. My point was more how convenient and unimaginative the solution seemed to me. The return of the Daleks was handled pretty well (IMHO) but then a cheesy “surprise!” moment, and the Doctor triumphs...

Was hoping for something more I guess...
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Solo4114

Master Member
I gave up after (1) the end of the Capaldi run, which itself was a massive disappointment that had a few terrific episodes in it, and (2) when we moved, switched cable providers, and the new one didn't have BBC America in the package we wanted. And in the meantime, Jodie's season only JUST came to a streaming platform we have.

I expect I'll get around to it, but to me, there a central flaw of the Moffat era.

Moffat struck me as, much like JJ Abrams, being actually a really craptastic storyteller without anyone around to reign him in and/or focus his efforts. He's another "roller-coaster engineer." His approach to storytelling was break-neck speed and selling things as "big" and "important" but without actually doing more to lay the groundwork within the story for that. As a result, I can barely recall anything from the Matt Smith seasons. I can only dimly remember the middle Clara season because it actually had a through-line...which he then totally discarded the next season as if it didn't matter.


The other major problem, as noted, was the multi-year delays in seasons. It's hard to maintain enthusiasm for the show when it only arrives every other year or so, and then when the seasons themselves are just...bleh.

And the stories in the individual episodes themselves stopped being that interesting. Like, the concepts weren't that interesting. The most memorable and best episodes were, of course. But a lot were just....awful. Like the one where trees take over the world and then, like, they burn up and go away and nobody remembers or something. Or the one where the moon is a friggin' egg laid by a space dragon, which hatches, and then a new moon is there and again, nobody seems to remember or notice after it all. That s**t isn't interesting. It's just stupid. It's like the writers were drunk and daring each other to write an episode about the most bats**t ideas they could, but then it was production time and that was all they had.
 

ShadowX81

Sr Member
I gave up after (1) the end of the Capaldi run, which itself was a massive disappointment that had a few terrific episodes in it, and (2) when we moved, switched cable providers, and the new one didn't have BBC America in the package we wanted. And in the meantime, Jodie's season only JUST came to a streaming platform we have.

I expect I'll get around to it, but to me, there a central flaw of the Moffat era.

Moffat struck me as, much like JJ Abrams, being actually a really craptastic storyteller without anyone around to reign him in and/or focus his efforts. He's another "roller-coaster engineer." His approach to storytelling was break-neck speed and selling things as "big" and "important" but without actually doing more to lay the groundwork within the story for that. As a result, I can barely recall anything from the Matt Smith seasons. I can only dimly remember the middle Clara season because it actually had a through-line...which he then totally discarded the next season as if it didn't matter.


The other major problem, as noted, was the multi-year delays in seasons. It's hard to maintain enthusiasm for the show when it only arrives every other year or so, and then when the seasons themselves are just...bleh.

And the stories in the individual episodes themselves stopped being that interesting. Like, the concepts weren't that interesting. The most memorable and best episodes were, of course. But a lot were just....awful. Like the one where trees take over the world and then, like, they burn up and go away and nobody remembers or something. Or the one where the moon is a friggin' egg laid by a space dragon, which hatches, and then a new moon is there and again, nobody seems to remember or notice after it all. That s**t isn't interesting. It's just stupid. It's like the writers were drunk and daring each other to write an episode about the most bats**t ideas they could, but then it was production time and that was all they had.
I completely agree. While I have totally fallen out of love with the Whittaker Era, the Moffat era was very hit or miss for me compared to the days of Tennant; in which even mediocre episodes offered something to appreciate.

In addition to the big picture problems, I hated the whimsical fairy tale feel of the 11th Doctor, in which the practical sensibilities of sci-fi were often thrown out the window to maintain this mood. "The Beast Below" always stands out for me as the worst of this trend in which almost nothing has any explanation behind it. An elevator in which a video screen has a child reading a creepy poem before it drops you to your death? Who recorded this child reading this and why did the makers of the elevator decide to go out of their way to install it? Why would a starship choose to make the primary security force on their ship appear to be antique carnival robots whose faces rotate to display their mood? We later learn that there are some of these robots that are humans that have undergone transformation to be half carnival security robot. For what purpose did they undergo this extensive medical procedure and what benefit does having a rotating head to display a creepy antique angry face offer them? Is the idea that the ship is powered by a tranquilized space whale so overwhelmingly disturbing to everyone that literally every person chooses to erase their memory of the knowledge immediately; even if they remember it just for the sake of putting a stop to it?

These all may sound like nitpicking, but these are major questions about the basics of this world and if you really want to stay a sci-fi show they all need answers.
But of course none of these questions have answers, because ultimately they were all aesthetic decisions made just because it was a creepy/whimsical idea. Moments like these were dotted throughout the 11th Doctors era; the stupidest of which is probably the time that River Song caused a paradox, and for some reason that caused Winston Churhill to live in an Egyptian Pyramid while Pterodactyls flew around. Once again, makes no sense. Someone just thought it was cool.

Don't get me started on the mind-bendingly complex story arcs with numerous plot holes, or the fact that several of the episodes or arc's resolutions were wrapped up literally through the power of wishing. Or the fact that throughout 11's era Moffat seemed to be unable to write grounded female characters that seemed more like ideas existing only to deliver clever one-liners than believable people.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top