Questions concerning Comissions

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by XxCALIBERxX, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. XxCALIBERxX

    XxCALIBERxX Member

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    Okay, I've been curious for a while, and now that someone has asked me to qoute them on something they wanted made I thought it was time I asked those of a more proffessional standing.

    I don't want too overcharge the guy, nor do I want to undercut myself. So, is there a magic way you guys do your commission work? The price of materials plus %20 or something along those line? Or do you charge by the hour?

    Also, along with that, what rights come with the piece? If someone has commissioned you to build something it is my understanding that that piece/mold and everything else is actually theirs, and as a result, unless given permisssion, you are unable to duplicate the work you did for them? Yes? No? Maybe?

    I'm just guessing, and really don't know much about it at all. I searched the forum, google and whatever else I could find for the last hour or so. If there is a thread like this around I'm sorry.

    Thanks for the help.

    Cheers, Dave.

    P.S excuse the mispelling in the title, can't figure out how to change it. :/.
     
  2. Knowone251

    Knowone251 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Well you cant always go off of your material cost. Vacuum formed pieces have a low material cost, but the time put into creating the bucks can be enormous. That being said, my father in law who own his own picture framing store has made a fine living charging 4x the material cost for his pieces. It gives you enough wiggle room for haggling and discounts. Rights pertaining to the piece are negotiable. For example, some one contacts you to make a light kit for a certain prop that you think would sell well to others, you might take a gamble and charge less to your initial client if he agrees to let you retain the right to make more to sell to others. If he wants exclusive rights or you think that there is no market for the kit outside the initial build then you will need to charge more to make it worth your time. That also applies to one off's. Any time you are making only one of something it should cost more. GET EVERYTHING IN WRITING, be clear with all dates and dead lines, decide on who is going to hold rights on the piece before you start, communicate often, and always get a down payment, preferably %50 but at least %25.

    Thats my two cents, hope it helps!
     
  3. XxCALIBERxX

    XxCALIBERxX Member

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    Thanks man! Good information! So there's really no set rule, more what you think is neccasery. Effectively, you could be making them and selling a few more to cover costs on Ebay or something (assuming they agree to let you retain the rights). Hmmm, you've given me a lot to think about. Thanks again.

    Cheers, Dave.
     
  4. crabra comander

    crabra comander Sr Member

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  5. XxCALIBERxX

    XxCALIBERxX Member

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    *, it was going to happen sooner or later. Can't say that the search is overly helpful in any case... Mod's can lock this thread away in the vault of shame as they see fit. :).

    Cheers.
     
  6. XxCALIBERxX

    XxCALIBERxX Member

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    Hmmm... That was more the painting side of things... I guess it kind of comes down to how much you vaalue your time though... Thanks guys. :D.

    Cheers, Dave.
     

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