mirrored eyeball

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Voodoocaster

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the clarifycation MWiggs,...really helpfull.
Another cool usefull technique learned :)
So,..if backing up the alclad with a clear coat ,..as in this case,..keeps the chrome more or less unaltered,.it might be worth a try to instead of covering the chrome with a top coat, backing it up instead with one.
I think ,if you shoot the alclad as smooth as possible there is no need for buffing it out to get a nice convincing chrome/mirror shine,..just a whipe with a soft brush gets rid of the dustiness.
The clear ontop most of the time ruins the effect somewhat.
I was thinking as an experiment to shoot some alclad chrome over a still tacky layer of gloss clear or any still tacky gloss color coat( laquer)so it can fuse with this back up layer and dry as one.
Maybe this will solve the rub off issues of the alclad and makes a top coat of gloss unnecessary
Anyone allready tried this,or something similar??
Does this all make sense?
Hmmm,..let's try and see what happens.
 
Last edited:

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Mr Mold Maker

Sr Member
If you don't want to go through the sealing, sanding, polishing, etc. routine, I'd suggest (again) IST products

Alumaluster has a resin base and it sticks to things quite vigorously. It allows you to cut out the need for a top coat, and by extension all the time and money spent wet sanding and then polishing the piece back to where it was.

The method used by MWiggs is great and there was certainly fantastic results. Just seems slightly more time consuming and labor intensive. :)
 

Thegreatiandi

New Member
If you don't want to go through the sealing, sanding, polishing, etc. routine, I'd suggest (again) IST products


Alumaluster has a resin base and it sticks to things quite vigorously. It allows you to cut out the need for a top coat, and by extension all the time and money spent wet sanding and then polishing the piece back to where it was.

The method used by MWiggs is great and there was certainly fantastic results. Just seems slightly more time consuming and labor intensive. :)[/QUOTE

Hey Mr. Mold Maker! I've got a a few questions regarding molding...after i have molded my clay. i would like to do a plaster mold...but I have 0 clue how to go about it. Do you think you could help me out?? Your name says it all, and your number of post looks like you may know your stuff buddy. I'm an extreme noob..
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top