Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Subscribe
  1. RPF Premium Member RobertMuldoon's Avatar
    Member Since
    Jul 2013
    From
    United Kingdom
    Messages
    363
    4 Weeks Ago  Jun 27, 2017, 10:37 AM - Re: My faux book project #51

    Friendly flyer said: View Post
    Do you think this cheapo set might work?
    I do, the trick will getting to the right temperature. Ideally you need the right kind of stove (Google 'hot stamping finishing stove') for doing that, but if you have a good IR thermometer you should be able to use something like a regular cooker to get them up to temperature. The guide temp I was taught was that if you put water on the stamp it should steadily evaporate but not sizzle and boil away, you're looking at around the 60C (140F) mark. Pressure and duration are just down to practice.

    I was looking at those exact sets (I came to the same conclusion that the only way to do this was the proper way), I don't have time on my current book project (it's being gifted next week) so I've decided not to splurge just yet. Next time I bind a book though...
  2. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    4 Weeks Ago  Jun 28, 2017, 3:48 PM - Re: My faux book project #52

    While still being undecided about gilding, I decided to give another type of book a go, this time at the cheaper end of books.

    In my previously mentioned dentist waiting room style new office, I have put up a few shelves. I also keep a few tools (we still need to bang in nails) in a cardboard box that leave a bit to be desired visually:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1970.JPG 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.11 MB 
ID:	739591

    (Ali kaffe is a Norwegian coffee brand. We drinks lots and lots of coffee at work)

    Now, this could do with some faux book spines! Luckily, old science books are often rather plain. From the invention of mass book production in the early 19th century, books were often sold "in boards", so that the (wealthy) patron could have them bound to his or her taste. In science, this tradition continued until the Great War or thereabouts. Cheapscates as most scientists are, a lot of reference works and report series were simply left in boards. Here's a few examples:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Deckle 2.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	48.8 KB 
ID:	739595Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cd42cc9bb4c3a87b11a263c3b5095afa--antique-books-old-books.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	56.6 KB 
ID:	739594Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bp14-06g.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	11.8 KB 
ID:	739593

    Soooooo, a report series it is then! First: Some bits of left over wood (notice the "test books" at the left margin):

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_1973.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	1.40 MB 
ID:	739601

    A quality evening spent with a file and some sand paper later:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2003.JPG 
Views:	12 
Size:	1.52 MB 
ID:	739603

    Each faux spine was given a layer of some stiff paper to hide the worst file marks:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2011.JPG 
Views:	9 
Size:	1.42 MB 
ID:	739606Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2010.JPG 
Views:	9 
Size:	1.36 MB 
ID:	739605Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2009.JPG 
Views:	9 
Size:	1.55 MB 
ID:	739604Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2014.JPG 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.59 MB 
ID:	739609


    Tomorrow I'll give the marbled paper a go. In multi-year series (as this is supposed to be), the binder would run out of one type of cover paper. Later books would be bound in similar (but different) paper, so that the books would vary over the years.

    Verdict so far: Plain sailing, zero costs.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2012.JPG 
Views:	5 
Size:	1.42 MB 
ID:	739607   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2013.JPG 
Views:	5 
Size:	1.69 MB 
ID:	739608  
  3. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    3 Weeks Ago  Jun 29, 2017, 7:09 AM - Re: My faux book project #53

    Day II of my science report series:

    Marbeld or pull-paste paper isn't that hard to make (YouTube has extensive tutorials on both techniques), but having a nice colour printer at work makes it even easier. I goggeled imaged of marbling, used Photoshop to make them match more or less in colour and printed a few:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2015.JPG 
Views:	9 
Size:	1.99 MB 
ID:	739751

    Next up was simply to cover the spines. I aimed for the effect of paper stock changing through the years:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2016.JPG 
Views:	13 
Size:	2.42 MB 
ID:	739752

    The idea is that the three thicker books are several years bound together. After three of these multi-year books, another bindery have taken over, binding single year volumes.

    Next up is labels. For this style of books, they are usually simple manilla paper labels with black text, printed or even handwritten. In the end, I'd like the books to look a bit like this (well, without the cover of course):

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	La Terrde avant de la Deluge.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	83.0 KB 
ID:	739753

    Now I just need to think of a suitably snotty sounding report series name, and start making labels. Since this kind of binding is typical of the German speaking tradition, I was thinking something along the vein of Quartalweise Beschreprchung der Naturkunde, Nationaluseum Budapest (quarterly review of natural science, national museum of Budapest) or something like that.
  4. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    3 Weeks Ago  Jun 29, 2017, 6:08 PM - Re: My faux book project #54

    Label time!

    I spent some quality time with the rickety old laptop putting together some fairly period-looking labels. Since some volumes are thicker than others, I had to make a few variants. Here's the labels for the first 6 books:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Quartalsweise III.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	1.15 MB 
ID:	739872

    A problem with a modern laser printer is that the letters are too perfect. I'll fiddle a bit with them to make them look more like a printed run (uneven ink. some letters not sitting straight etc). I'll cut an A4 sheet from an old manilla envelope to match the style of the books.
  5. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    3 Weeks Ago  Jul 1, 2017, 6:13 AM - Re: My faux book project #55

    While waiting for Monday and some quality time with the printer, I've stated another project.

    I was down at the local home supplier picking up the usual lot of screws & stuff when I noticed some brownish cardboard packing material in the bin:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2020.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	2.02 MB 
ID:	740254

    It's about a yard long and each side is roughly two inches wide.

    Now, bit's of cardboard are everywhere, but what caught my interest was the surface. It's obviously built up of layers of brownish and slightly translucent paper, giving it some of the same visual qualities as velum (untanned leather). So, I took some home with me to compare with some velum reference material:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2022.JPG 
Views:	20 
Size:	1.53 MB 
ID:	740255


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2022.JPG 
Views:	20 
Size:	1.53 MB 
ID:	740255

    Yes, that thing on top is an actual 17th century velum bound book.

    I had originally considered buying a piece of drumskin to do velum spines, but this might do the trick. To get the right curvatures and some ribbing at the head and foot similar to the actual volume, I let the cardboard soak in water and bound it to a suitable cylindrical shape (a shovel handle):

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2019.JPG 
Views:	11 
Size:	1.20 MB 
ID:	740256

    Now it remains to see if the visual characteristics of the cardboard have survived the soaking. If so, I've basically found a free source of velum spines.
  6. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    3 Weeks Ago  Jul 1, 2017, 12:59 PM - Re: My faux book project #56

    Wohooo, it worked!

    The cardboard retained it's colour and slight translucence, and the double gutters at the head and foot took!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2023.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	1.97 MB 
ID:	740337

    The slightly wrinkly "extra" bits is cardboard I teased off from the underside. I plan to use it to make "quarter leather binding". Of course, velum binding is usually full covers (it was the "cheap paperback" of the Renascence), but it will do for my faux book project.

    Next up is making a box and adding titles.
  7. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    3 Weeks Ago  Jul 5, 2017, 1:49 PM - Re: My faux book project #57

    Update in my "science book" series:

    I had a slow day at work today, so I got to spend some quality time with Photoshop and the labels. Here's how they turned out when printed in a sheet cut from an old manilla envelope:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2029.JPG 
Views:	8 
Size:	1.92 MB 
ID:	741461

    Cut out the first labels and glued them onto my paper covered spines:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2030.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	2.02 MB 
ID:	741462

    The full set, and some experiments in distressing:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2031.JPG 
Views:	17 
Size:	2.55 MB 
ID:	741463

    I'm quite pleased with how this turned out! Now, I'll need to do some subtle weathering on the spines (tears, dirt).

    So far, cost 0
  8. Friendly flyer's Avatar
    Member Since
    Mar 2016
    From
    Oslo, Norway
    Messages
    374
    2 Weeks Ago  Jul 7, 2017, 8:04 AM - Re: My faux book project #58

    Finishing the science report set:

    First up, distressing. These books have a tendency to crack their spines longitudinally. Tears are usually confined to the top of the spine. I used some black fat based crayon to simulate accumulated grease from the hand and dirt. Not perfect, but passable:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2032.JPG 
Views:	8 
Size:	2.13 MB 
ID:	741743

    To preserve it all I gave it a lick of shellac, and immediately regretted it. It made the labels quite a bit darker and shiny. Note to self: If using shellac, add the labels afterwards. The next day it looked better, but while not obvious from the next picture, the labels were still quite a bit darker:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2034.JPG 
Views:	4 
Size:	2.15 MB 
ID:	741744

    Oh well, this was just an experiment anyway. Time to mount them. Just a recap: The cardboard crate with my tools in the office:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fr.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	2.64 MB 
ID:	741747 and Click image for larger version. 

Name:	heretter.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	2.65 MB 
ID:	741748

    Tadaaaa - much more sciency!

    Verdict:
    Cost - practically 0.
    Look - workable in a science institution, for a genteel library, not so much
    Lessons learned: - I need to stay off the shellac for paper labels.
    - Manilla paper (from old envelopes) look really cool
    - Printed marbling actually looks very good!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2035.JPG 
Views:	4 
Size:	1.46 MB 
ID:	741745   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_2036.JPG 
Views:	6 
Size:	1.62 MB 
ID:	741746  

Similar Threads

  1. softening faux leather, is it possible?
    Izzy358, Marvel Costumes and Props
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep 10, 2014, 5:14 AM
  2. Magneto comic Book style - first pep project - Updated 10/3
    Lord Magneto, Marvel Costumes and Props
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: Oct 24, 2013, 9:11 AM
  3. Book of Serets Project
    propcollector, Replica Props
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Feb 27, 2010, 6:06 PM