Your Opinion on Pepakura....

Discussion in 'Replica Costumes' started by Crank729, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Crank729

    Crank729 Sr Member

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    I have had this question in my head for quite a while now. I have heard and seen some people praise pepakura for its simple technique and impressive outcome, given that time and care are put into the final product.

    Yet, I see other people think that pep has no creativity and will not encourage a good final product.

    Some love it, some hate it. What do you think about pepakura?
     
  2. Blaxmyth

    Blaxmyth Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I think for me it's added an affordable and work-intensive (read 'fun-intensive') alternative to the hobby. For me, it's a way I can own a version of some iconic helmets, and have the fun of building them at the same time. Also, I find the process of making something just as pleasurable as owning the finished item, so I get a double dose of prop fun!

    Just my thoughts, and I appreciate that others may disagree.

    Oh, also, one last thought - it's a cool new way to increase my vast stock of partly-finished projects!
     
  3. ONEYE

    ONEYE Sr Member

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    I don't like the word Pepakura, isn't it just paper-craft?
     
  4. moose

    moose Active Member

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    i find it incredibly rage inducing, but at the same time, i'm glad it's around. just that sole purpose of being a simplified template is worth the time and effort, in my opinion. plus, like mentioned above, it is very affordable. a stack of 110lb paper, some resin, fiberglass, and bondo, really doesn't break the bank at all. as for the idea of it not being creative or not encouraging a good final product, that all has to do with who is doing the build. if you don't spend the time to make it a good pep, and don't bother with the fine details in the bondo, then no, it's not particularly creative, and definitely not a good product. BUT, if you do spend that extra time, holy crap does it become a serious work of art.
     
  5. Dart

    Dart Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I agree with moose. While I've never done pep myself, I've seen stuff that was really poorly done and other stuff that didn't look like it started as a pep file. The artistry is in the finishing but the patience to assemble it all is completely necessary.
     
  6. micdavis

    micdavis Master Member

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    Hate the name, but what's in a name.

    It seems to be more work than just building something out right.

    Although some it is spectacular, most of what I've seen it ends up looking blocky, chunky and unfinished.

    I also have no idea what it really takes to get something "pepped".
     
  7. elro

    elro Active Member

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    An example of what PEP can do :
    Standard pep,
    [​IMG]

    After putting effort into making the surface perfectly flat to 800 grit paper, which requires more finesse than anything (+skill working with products rather than skill in making templates).
    [​IMG]


    My thoughts on PEP? As long as someone puts effort in after the paper model, it is MORE than acceptable.

    Well, there is no question as to what is right or wrong - Whatever works for you is how you make something. Pep requires certain skills, and scratch building requires others.

    Pep = Finishing skills / Working with products.
    Scratch = Finding Materials with an existing finish and applying them into a certain shape.

    they are completely different so there is no question as to what is 'better'. simply, they are different.
     
  8. mikey123mushukl

    mikey123mushukl Well-Known Member

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    PEPAKURA IS AAAAAAAWWWWWWWSSSSSOOOOOMMMMMEEEE!!!!!!!!

    Pepakura has allowed me to make props that are not redily available or are astronomicly expensive, or both. I can also customize the prop. Pepakura / papercraft has provided me with a realatively inexpensive hobby that produces amazing results. Check out my pepakura based Rocketeer rocket pack photo album on my RPF profile page. pepakura as a hobby more than pays for itself.
     
  9. ONEYE

    ONEYE Sr Member

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    I don't know, I view paper as something cheap, easily destroyed, fragile. I prefer something made of sturdier material, stuff that will last. I confess, I don't know much of the process. There are too many things made out of stuff that I do trust to get involved in collecting paper props.
     
  10. elro

    elro Active Member

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    Paper is weak? Thats why we fibreglass it then coat with a filler on the outside ;)

    Well the good Pep artists will glass then filler + sand for many hours.
     
  11. Hamsterstyle

    Hamsterstyle Well-Known Member

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    I think it's another great tool in crafting.

    But really, all it is, is a template.

    My only issue with pep is the tons and tons of threads that only include pictures of the assembled pep model, but with barely any work done on it. But it's not a big deal just something I notice. Those threads really are only showing a paint by numbers result, not much actual artistry.

    That being said, when people put the time and effort into finishing the project that is templated out from the pep. There is some amazing, amazing work done there.

    But hey, it's a great and easy way to start for people, I just wish that people would get a few steps into a project before posting a thread with their assembled pep models.

    Just wait until 3d printers are everywhere.
     
  12. micks75au

    micks75au Active Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Pepa kura leads itself to other mediums aside from the paper resin route. Its led to some sensational foam works (Don Robert and Stealth as examples). I see that it can also be a good visual and fabrication aid for prototyping full scratchbuilt works on th cheap so you can see what problem areas there will be in advance before you expend and waste time (and cash) on costly errors. As mentioned previously they can be printed out to create full scale 2D blueprints. At the end of the day it comes down to the modeller and the effort he/she expends. Not everyone has the budget for vaccuforming.
     
  13. Rinzler

    Rinzler Well-Known Member

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    I for one love the idea of being able to make it from scratch (not buying kits etc) and the whole (long & frustrating) process. I've only pep'd 3 helmets (all Tron Legacy ones) and my only gripe is the pep's never seem to line up properly despite utmost care cuting and gluing :S so I am having to improvise/adapt the model as I go.
     
  14. pRoJectEarth7

    pRoJectEarth7 Well-Known Member

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    I think the key statement on the 1st post is "PEP HAS NO CREATIVITY AND WILL NOT ENCOURAGE A GOOD FINAL PRODUCT"...

    In my humble opinion, pep is just a start... now to make a good final product will definitely need a LOT of CREATIVITY... It really lies on the person using pep :):thumbsup... sample of final product below...
    [​IMG]
    (Click photo to see details of the build)

    CREATIVITY???... WHERE? :confused... but its a great machine really...(y)thumbsup


    ^Now that's CREATIVITY there...:)(y)thumbsup
     
  15. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    But see, technically you ARE just assembling a kit.

    Most these pep files come from other peoples designs, IE ripped from a video game, or a 3d scan or a character, or a file someone creates and offers to the community. (Also, Rinzler, not trying to poke at you or single you out, just your quote led to my initial point)

    We do have a lot of folks here talented in 3D design who create their own pep files from scratch, but probably 90% of the "pep threads" on this forum, are just people using someone's created work and just printing it off and taping it together. It's the same mentality as me buying someone's "kit" and putting hours and hours of finishing work into it, and attempting to make it better than the artists original piece. I spend hours with precision jewelry files edgings out grooves and angled recesses to perfection, or filing the tiniest pin holes to give an unrippled and unscathed surface for paint.

    In all honesty, I have tried my hand a pepakura, and you are right, it takes an incredible amount of patience to do. In fact I own a Master Chief kit by our own Thorssoli, whom constructed his suit out of pepakura and molded it for fiberglass repro. There are some true masters out there who are insanely skilled with pepakura. But most the persons using Paper-Craft think it is the end all be all of prop making methods. When in fact, to me, its nothing more than a prop-making "paint-by-numbers". We have members here who were classically trained at some of the best institutions in the world for sculpting and production, who have put YEARS into their craft, to have people (and I'm sorry to throw it out there, but I'm going no holds barred on this) who are in the age bracket of 12-16 years come here and expect us to gravel at their wobbly Iron Man pep helmet they made in a day or 2, when we have members like TMP who spent WEEKS, MONTHS EVEN, sculpting from a raw clump of clay, an full IronMan suit. No numbers to line up, no instructions, just raw uninhibited talent taking over.

    So, my opinion, like it or hate it...but I think Pepakura really brings the prop world a very unskilled demographic, but at the same allows props and costuming to become a hobby for those who might not truly be able to afford it.
     
  16. Leander

    Leander Active Member

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    Pep itself might not be all that creative, exept for the adjusting adapting and improvising mentioned. But Pepakura is a great tool to use when making a touchable scales product of a model you made in 3D.

    the real creativity lies before and after the Pepakura phase. in making the model aswell as making your pep into a detailed nice looking product.


    Another example I found at my studies.

    I am a Product designer and at my studies I've used pep serveral times to make my 3d product into a model of the actual product (well the outer casing). During one of my projects I was the only one who made a real model because of the time pressure during the project. But a model that people can actually look, touch and feel says so much more then a nice 3D rendering where the product is rendered into an enviroment or Photoshopped into someone's hands.

    So in my opinion Pepakura is a tool, Papercrafting is a method.
    But they are very effective for making a low budget model in a small amount of time.
    With the option of making it very detailed (and pricy depending on how far you want to go).
     
  17. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    Exactly. That is the great thing about it. Which the later portion, having the option to make it more detailed, we have a few artists here who have done that. And ultimately they went to the lengths to then mold their pieces into a applicable medium.

    What it is that really fatigues me when I come to the RPF is when the "Replica Movie Costumes" Forum page is literally all IRONMAN PEP WIP, or MK4 IRONMAN PEP SUIT. What used to distinguish artists here was their own take or their opinion on a certain curve on an item in a certain place and how they machined that curve or sculpted it was the modifier, or the VAST amounts of diversity in items we see. Now it is, "I used 99% scaled instead of 100% scaling". They are a recast thread of a recast thread of a recast thread to me.

    The same Iron Man suit, done with the same Iron Man Pep file, done in the same materials, done in the quickest time possible, with 10 pages of I taped this here today, and resined it there this evening...
     
  18. Jehudah Design

    Jehudah Design Well-Known Member

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    I think it's sort of cheating to make something awesome, in a way.
    Even if the end result looks awesome, it really comes to show that you only proved your skill at reinforcing a shape someone else already made, not that you can replicate details exactly or create something completely from scratch, so this is why although some of the things I make exist as Pepakura files, I prefer to make the whole shabang myself and be way more pleased with the outcome that way.
     
    Gilmortar likes this.
  19. 466

    466 New Member

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    Pepakura rocks!
    I started a War Machine (HD). Its my first attempt on this kind of custume. Shure, im ONLY printing, cutting out, follding, glueing, smoothing and painting that thing. BUT I dont wanna spend two or more years on building that thing from scratch. Whoever likes to do it that way...go for it :)

    I was building a Boba Fett costume 15 years ago...from scratch. It was expensive, took a looong time and the end result was...O.K.
    Internet was no help at that time, so i had to figure out everything by myself.
    It was fun. But today, i dont have anough spare time to do such a thing again :/
    I like Pepakura. Its an "easy" way to build nice costumes and not burning money. Thanks to all the PPL doing those great PEPs!!! I hope i can stick to the building process. It took me 30 hours just to build the forearm XD

    I respect those ppl saying that they wanna build things from scratch. But they should respect other ways also. Some ppl build their own furniture. Others walk into IKEA and bamm the stuff together :)
    For me, the end result counts. Did i had fun building it? Was it worth the time and money spent? If i can answer that question with "YES"...everything is fine :)
    The most important thing over all is: HAVE FUN ^^
     
  20. ReverendCasey

    ReverendCasey New Member

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    I gotta say as a noob to all of this I was actually amazed by pepakura (terrible name) I'll admit when i first found this place i got super excited to make a iron man suit. Didnt know that something so amazing looking was even possible! But I gotta say, even I am sick of all the iron man threads and I just got here lol

    Even with that being said, I feel like some of you guys come off a little discouraging, condescending and elitist with your above comments. Now I don't dare make a Mk V because I don't want to bore you guys... However, in order for me to sculpt and become a "real" craftsman in your eyes, I need to life cast my own bust since a normal armature won't work for my abnormal 24" melon... And that's just the helm. I'll need to buy a fullsize mannequin to do the rest of the suit. With no sculpting experience... That's a pretty large investment for something you've never done befor when you don't even know that you Are capable of doing it. Guess I better go buy some clay befor I try to contribute around here...
     
  21. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    well 466 hit the nail on the head. If you have fun doing it than its all that really matters. Just don't be offended or surprised if there isn't much reaction to another Iron Man Pep thread.

    In the end its not about impressing anyone, unless thats your motive. Just again, don't be surprised if you don't see some of the pros and vets of this board posting in your thread.

    I don't speak for anyone but myself. But it is a large investment. I started out when I was about 15, making lightsabers from sink tubing. And now I Sculpt, form, cast, make most of my own items. 10 years of trial and error. And I've spent thousands as well, of money that I barely had to do so.

    And yeah, maybe I am an elitist. This board is home to hundreds of elite artists. But you say you would have to buy a full size mannequin and make a life cast. Yeah...thats what we do. There are simple ways to do those things. But to me, its just like paint-by-numbers. Just because put the paint in the places it told you to on the Mona Lisa outline, doesn't make you Da Vinci...

    So you find it discouraging and condescending...I find it funny that some people who only use pepakura, call themselves "master craftsmen" or artists. But this is like the recasting topic.

    People will say its ok, and others will say it isn't. I am one that I find pepakura as a cheat or means to an ends for those who can't take the time to learn another medium.
     
  22. Supa troop

    Supa troop Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i have no vested interest in Pepping but what i would like to know is where you guys get these kits from, surely the art is in the way the kit is made not the way its put together to get the finished product
     
  23. Mattastic13

    Mattastic13 Well-Known Member

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    I wish I could give thumbs up to a post...I would thumbs up Gilmore's post.

    I am by no means good at prop making, but I come here to learn, and I read almost every topic whether it pertains to what I like or not. I have to agree whole heartedly with Gilmore. With this Pep stuff it is all identical to a certain degree. The scratch builds have different methods that everyone can learn from.
     
  24. EyeofSauron

    EyeofSauron Master Member

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    you have to allways account the supplies available at ones place.
    for example, i have not found a supply for clay to sculpt yet, and everything that you guys in the us get for cheap at your standard hardware stores, are either not available at all here, or come at 10 times the price

    also, i have yet to make a pep build, that it didnt have to modify before continuing
    (except maybe the whole iron man thingie, because lets face it, everyone makes those, and therefor the pep models are perfected)
    but still, that doesnt account for details etc. nowhere in a pep model are screws, cutlines etc, its just a flat surface.
    im in no way an advanced prop builder, but if you cant get any supplies, other than paper and maybe resin and filler, then you dont have a lot of choices.
    also, a pep build is what you make out of it, its not a foolproof way to build something. (unless you dont to finishing and just keep the pep with resin and fibreglass)
     
  25. davy

    davy Well-Known Member

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    For me pepakura is perfect thing, i know that there are very much work and dirty work but the results are Amazing . And i can change everything what i want. Thanks to the Guys what making pep files for us !
     
  26. Lord Magneto

    Lord Magneto Well-Known Member

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    I would say as a beginner to this entire medium Pep files fit perfectly for me. I need a bit of hand holding in order to get me going in the right direction... however after I've created that pep piece it's up to me to get it to the finish line.

    I'm currently working on a Magneto helmet that I've wanted to try and build for years now. I actually attempted to build one about 4 years ago and I had no idea how to go about doing it. I took a foam head wrapped some chicken wire around it and started applying clay... it was a gah * nightmare and put me off wanting to try anything else.

    I then stumbled on this site and was able see what other people are doing and the techniques that they were using.

    For me I'm just looking to build some kickass props of stuff that I love so I can show it off here in my home. How I end up with the final product is up to me.

    Pepakura might be for "noobs" or for less creative people but hell if I care are long as I put in some hard work and see some great results I'm one happy camper.
     
  27. Fullmetalsam

    Fullmetalsam Active Member

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    I like this thread very much.
    I've been thinking about this (love/hate pepakura and why) for the last few days.

    IMHO, I feel the same way as Gilmore of OK.
    I also want to point out that I don't consider myself to be a master craftmen or prop maker... I do that for fun and I chose my favorite material based solely on price so I could make what I want, when I want and not to think too much about budget when I want to get into a new project.

    However, what gets me the most about pepakura is that I feel that in general it is actually promoting a certain way of doing things that is not encouraging creativity at all. Again, I use the term in general because it's always depending on how the builder is taking on the project.

    Most likely it's the kind of situation where a few bad apples will spoil the bunch... but I just am so disappointed when I see the kind of thread when someone is just asking for a pep file. It just demonstrate how much you want to be involved in this hobby... first, you don't even want to spend the time figuring out what you're trying to build (using pepakura takes care of that for you)... but you don't even want to spend some time looking around for the file.

    Anyhow... the technique does yield some very impressive results when done properly and there are some pepakura thread out there that I've liked to read... but it's usually because the builder will go beyond the pepakura (like actually designing a new way to make your ironman helmet face plate open and stay up). I enjoy the foam/pepakura build a lot better - just because the pepakura files can't be used as is for a foam suit and I think that being able to adjust your pepakura file to work with foam shows at least a bit of creativity.
     
  28. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    I am a noob to costumes, prop making, and all mediums. I am not very skilled at sculpting, building, drawing, or manufacturing of any kind. Since I started with my first costume, I have been hooked. I am slowly gathering parts for a screen accurate ROTJ Boba Fett and in the meantime, I am trying my hand at an IronMan build from Pep, and yes, i have a thread on here for it.

    I don't understand the hostility towards Pepakura (Japanese term that roughly translates to papercraft). It does seem that a lot of the skilled craftsman and women are upset about pepakura. If Pepakura puts tools in peoples hands and gets creativity going and the process to create something from nothing, this community should praise and encourage those people. You never know what they might want to take on after that confidence building experience. For me, I also have a Vac table and I helped my brother make a GhostBusters proton pack shell from scratch, that we molded and made copies with fiberglass and resin. Some people just want to make a cheap, Haloween costume that is better than something that is licensed*cough, Rubies, *cough.

    I am not naive, I realize that there are some shoddy builds out there from Pepakura that are cut, glue, resin and paint. If they are happy with their build and can say they didn't spend a small fortune and that they built it, then we should be happy for them. Lets accept Pepakura for what it is, and not judge the builders before we know what they are truly capable of.

    I am very grateful that all of the builders share their projects and lessons learned with each other on this forum no matter what medium they choose to use.
     
  29. ONEYE

    ONEYE Sr Member

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    Thanks. Is the inside of the paper also fiberglassed? Both sides?

    I don't think it's hostility, for me it's papercraft. What's wrong with English? Does it make it "sexier", "cooler", to use a non-English term for it? I think it's more to do with my dislike of poor grammer, ill use of words in movies and media today. "Where you at?" "My bad." "Represent." Are just some examples of poor, sloppy speech. Then again, I may be too uptight about this, or maybe I have a corncob stuck up my butt in a sideways position.:unsure
     
  30. EyeofSauron

    EyeofSauron Master Member

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    its only fiberglassed inside. outside its bondo or similar

    i think papercraft and pepakura still are different things.

    for me, papercraft are those simple shapes, while pepakura has a lot of details and a lot of faces.
     
  31. Laffo

    Laffo Sr Member

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    Or spelling.
    Laffo.
     
  32. ONEYE

    ONEYE Sr Member

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    Oh no, did I spell something incorrectly? :$
     
  33. Fullmetalsam

    Fullmetalsam Active Member

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    I don't think it is hostility - well for most people.
    But I think that the opinions is actually based on what you're saying here.

    Some think that pepakura is not getting people creative... because it makes you skip over a very "creative-intensive" part of the whole process of making a prop/costume: which would be designing the thing (figuring what material you're going to use, how you're going to have to recreate what you're seeing on paper/screen/whatever).

    The same could be said of the remainder of the process, which is always the same thing: resining, bondo, sand, bondo, sand, bondo, sand, paint.

    This whole thing is a difficult topic... because - yes - not all people are that straightforward with there pep builds (meaning they are very creative in solving problems and in finishing their project to their liking). However, the ones we usually see are the "shoddy builds" you're referring to.
     
  34. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    Pepakura is a program that was originally developed in Japan and that is why it has a Japanese name. It is the same program that is used to unfold the 3d models. It can be used for lager than life models, life size models, or smaller tabletop models of an AT-AT for example. Its all the same thing. The only difference i can think of is that since you don't have to re-scale the smaller models to fit your body type, they can be printed to PDF and distributed in a more common file type. Makers of costumes with the help of paper as a base use Pepakura Designer to manipulate the scale of the models and that is why we call it Pepakura, because it is the program that we use. We could still call it papercraft and it would be just as accurate. It is a little easier to say, still grammatically incorrect, "pep a file" than to say, "I am going to assemble the .pdo papercraft file".
     
  35. juntari

    juntari New Member

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    I think its a great way to get a model nice and symmetrical, if you take the time to finish it properly
     
  36. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    In response to the lack of creativity argument, would you agree that any prop making that is something from a movie, has a lack of creativity since it is merely copying something that has already been created by someone else? The work is in the details and the same amount of work is in the higher quality pep-based costumes and props. Anyone can choose a medium to recreate their version of something made on screen and it could have the same range of quality regardless of the medium.
    Could we agree on the topic of the discussion here? Are we discussing the validity of Pepakura as a prop making method or the quality of work that can come from it?
    Someone said, and forgive me for not giving credit to who said it, that Pepakura builders are not master prop makers. Where did a Pepakura builder say they were a master prop maker? Most people say in one of their first posts that they are noobs. Some of these people make incredible props and go on to making molds and putting them on the JY.

    Sorry for the rants, this topic is a little close to home.
     
  37. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    I don't think I have hostility towards those who do paper-craft (for you ONEYE ;)). In fact I really have no problem with it. But to give you the idea of what it is I do have a problem with, is this: THE 405th FORUMS

    There are probably 5 people on there that don't use pepakura for their builds.

    and sgtski, you are one of the few. Someone who stepped beyond pepakura. The mentality I see and hear of, well we don't have access to certain things, or we don't have the know how. Well there are lots of other things out there besides paper and resin, or clay for that matter. Look at Volpin. His choice medium is foam, or LeeKeegan, master of all things Woodcraft.

    I in my years have used NUMEROUS things to make my items. Plaster, Clay, Wood, Foam, Plastic, GRANITE (yes I attempted to chisel granite), and even glass.

    Hell, some of our members here will even tell you they have NO ARTISTIC TALENT WHATSOEVER. But they have knowledge of items, or processes involved. But they contribute how they know best. Lots of people have done that here, it's why we are what we are now. But it goes back to my point that 90% of the pepakura builders here have said it, they don't know anything else. Well how did you find out about pepakura? It isn't the only way to do things.

    I just can't get past the fact that some call it master work, when all it is is resining some paper, slabbering bondo over it all and sanding it down until you hit paper and covering it with a little more bondo again until its smooth, then adding a few details.

    Someone who I have seen grow from that here on the boards, TubaChris. I've known this guy digitally for about 5 years now, and he started doing pepakura, and now he is almost finished with a Darktrooper helmet sculpt. In a plaster/clay medium. He decided to take a leap of faith, and it has taken time, but it's quite incredible to see his progress as an artist.

    It's also the way I look at CGI. Everyone is going CGI now and almost cutting out real props/costumes/sceneries. And it will NEVER be as good as the real thing, no matter what you can or can't do. It's an easy route.
     
  38. G33k

    G33k Member

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    Pepakura's a very handy tool. Like all tools the creativity lies in the use.
     
  39. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    Again, take a look over at the 405th forums.

    But I'll give you a good example of why I don't like Pepakura.

    Make me an exact replica of the ESB Yoda Puppet using Pepakura....
     
  40. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    I would say that i agree with you on everything except 1 point and that may be that I missed something. I haven't seen anyone refer to Pepakura as "master work", except maybe as to refer to their product as a master for a mold they plan to make.

    We should still be responsible and encourage the new builder who found Pepakura as a way to "get their hands dirty" and guide them to other mediums instead of belittling their first choice. We can pass knowledge onto them and point them in the right direction by sharing our experiences.

    I also find it sad that more and more movies are going the cheap route and going with CGI. My first build was an Episode 3 Kashyyyk trooper costume and I had quite an adventure trying to create a costume that never existed in real life.
     
  41. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    I am over there as well and perhaps I just don't pay attention to it or I never noticed it. I do not mean to make your opinions invalid.
    Every medium has its strengths and weaknesses, try to make an exact replica of an X wing from clay. Both can be done, but each have better ways of doing them. I'll admit, an X wing from clay would be way better than a Pepakura Yoda, but you get my point.
     
  42. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    Exactly.

    And if I come off as being defensive, I assure it's not, nor am I trying to belittle or prove anyone wrong, especially you sgtski.

    You have the best points so far.

    And pepakura HAS its advantages.

    I'll admit it. I AM USING A PEP FILE! I am using it to scale out armor for a character to make it more realistic. So peping it allows me to scale it, and then sculpt it.

    But I unfortunately have seen it with certain banned members from here who would smear it in your face that pepakura was the best method for anything, when really, it's good for polygonal based items. People like Fettster and those who can sculpt the human persona to the most perfect of likenesses, ASTONISHES ME. And even said, GINO and his Yoda puppet and Palpatine, are remarkable.

    And then people who can take a PVC pipe and make a 1:1 exact replica of an E11 Stormtrooper blaster.

    All different methods for different things, just pepakura isn't the only one out there is all I am sayin...well, that and I just really see it as a good beginners craft. It just isn't something that I would say is the best by any means for any professional costume, prop making methods.

    I have done alot of Custom design and fabrication for films in my time. And I have used numerous methods. But even then, I haven't thought, "hmm, i should render this in CAD, and then pep it, and mold it". I don't need to, I can cut out a whole process of "redesigning" my design in 3D. I have it infront of me already, so I just DO IT, with whatever means I need to be it clay, plastic, foam, plaster, etc etc.
     
  43. Fullmetalsam

    Fullmetalsam Active Member

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    Well it seems that the discussion is between Gilmore and Sgtski... but I wanted to make sure I was getting this comment in there.

    Sgtski - you're saying that we should encourage builders and not belittling there first choice and I think everyone will agree with that (myself included) ... and I don't want the comments I made in this thread to be taken that way, because it was certainly not my intent to do so (belittling what people choose to start with).

    I guess, it all comes back to what other have already said - pepakura is a tool and it all depends on how it's used.
     
  44. Gilmortar

    Gilmortar Sr Member

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    Yes, exactly that.

    I don't think any of us are trying to belittle others, it just seems that some people do take opinions as personal attacks...but again, not intended to attack anyone, just stating my views.
     
  45. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    I only made that comment because i felt like that was the direction the thread was going and it got me all riled up. I am sorry if it was a little presumptuous on my part. That is also why i didn't call any one person out.
     
  46. pRoJectEarth7

    pRoJectEarth7 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmmm... simply put - "Different folks, different strokes!"...;):thumbsup

    cheers!
     
  47. sgtski

    sgtski Member

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    I like it, that's catchy.:thumbsup
     
  48. SwedishNinja

    SwedishNinja New Member

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    its a love hate relationship for me. I love that I can make one of the hundreds of iconic props costumes or helmets, but I hate the repetitive cuts, and scores and folds and gluing, then glassing, and bondo and sand and bondo and sand again... if you can stick with the boring parts and add some love into the details you can make something amazing and unique. I have seen dozens of the standard Halo costume done and everyone has their own touch to it.

    [​IMG]
     
  49. elro

    elro Active Member

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    341
    Living a Unit, I in no way have the facilities to start working with clay - The closest i get to that is using plasticine.

    Due to restrictions on what I can do at home, I use Pep to make an overall 'rough' of the shape i need to cover, then spray with exp. foam (which i have to travel to my parents place to do - 1hour 1/2 away ^^;) on the inside (such as the headcrab im working on atm). It serves as an excellent basic frame to build upon but still requires sculpting skills for intricate detailing and texturing. (Must be careful about plasticine meeting carpet though :X)

    In regards to people collecting PEP files, making a build thread with PEP progress shots - Yeah, thats lame >< If people were passionate about armoring, they would do a process for PEP similar to me - Find a model if possible / model it themselves (Half my work has been modelled by myself) - AND even if the model exists I will still remodel the entire thing because they are never at all suitable for PEP - this does take a lot planning, effort and foresight to ensure when pepped its not likely to warp.

    My first build ever was Kaworu Nagisa from NGE (link)- I did this entirely from scratch using craft foam and coating it will Vinyl. i think this shows that I can actually scratch build armor, but i much prefer to use PEP - I actively model or remodel 3d objects for my own personal use (which was previously stated, most people do not ><), Since I actually bother to edit my own models I do all the basic shaping work needed prior to putting it together. This also falls inline with CAD users for any sort of design - Using CAD to make a product isnt cheating is it? You cant call a final product crap because it was modelled on computer.

    Once its glassed, I then apply the filler on top (whoopty doo xD) - And this returns to the plasticine like sculpting. And then the interesting part start =The PEP serves as a frame - It looks TERRIBLE on its own, but once you start surfacing, adding details then it becomes creative and this is also the stage where how much of frack you give to do a good job comes into play. Ill agree, Pepakura has been tarnished by the amount of 'Slop some filler on, sand with 240 grit then paint' + #47243623846 Ironman build (((way to kill a character guys...))) builds ive seen - This account for a LARGE majority on the internet.

    I only use PEP for armor parts, and most of which ive made the model so that it is basic frame to build on top of. - If I can combine my skills on 3D modelling/editting with armor making, there is NO reason I shouldnt.

    Everything else I do (props etc) is via traditional methods of planning, choosing appropriate materials then manual shaping labor and If im unsure of dimension ill still model a low quality version of the prop for 3d visual reference (I dont pep it though, thats a waste of time).
    Although, I do normally make my templates in inkscape, I more tend to print them, then cut them out of cardboard pieces as a quick prototype (cardboard i have is about equal to 6mm MDF = Excellent size ;) )
    (My first props, the ME2 weapons Link

    I guess the problem is when people use Pepakura for EVERYTHING they do - Armor, props, etc. - I have seen pep models for mobile phones FFS. why would you even bother????????????????????? As well as never customising or personalising the piece for themselves (Thats why you see people in oversized / tight fighting pieces.

    Summarised : Pepakura is a really great method to use - When you put the effort in for yourself, and dont treat the program like a 'Jigsaw puzzle receiver'. Use Pep as a skill, not as a method.
     
  50. MCL34N

    MCL34N Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with the general sentiment that there really is no "right way" to do any sort of prop or costume making, and as long as you get what you want out of it, that's all that really matters.

    That being said, I have to side with some of the members on here who feel that a majority of pep work done is just glorified piecing together of jigsaw puzzles. The most difficult part of any build is bringing a shape from your imagination to reality. I think the real ire towards Pep work, is that for 95% of what pep is done, this step is essentially skipped over. If you make your own 3D models and pep those, then it's an entirely different story, you're using Pep like the tool that it is. But if you're building a pep file that someone else created, you're skipping over one of the most difficult stages of prop or costume development. Once again, there is no right way to do this, and if it gives you the product you want, then that's all that matters, but I agree with an earlier post that said that Pep creates a sense of apathy and entitlement. The attitude of "Oh, there's no Pep file? It can't be done" when so many members on here pride themselves on their hard-earned ability to approach a project that has no Pep files, or even no history of being done at all, and bring it into reality.

    This also gives a much wider variety to the work that is done. No costume is "Perfect," even the costumes in the films have their flaws. But what pep does is it brings the same flaws and strengths into every project. Every Iron Man Pep suit I see has the same flaws and the same shapes, and it just gets boring. It's so much more exciting to see someones strengths and weaknesses as a builder come through their work. I also don't accept the idea of "I'm new to prop making, this is the only way for me to have this project" Honestly that just sounds to me like a fear of failure. If you're new, your projects will look like crud. That's just the way it is, for everyone. But by trudging through this early phase of a prop/costume making career, you begin to learn what you're doing wrong or right, and your projects begin to improve exponentially. It's just a matter of allowing your initial projects to suck. The other part of this is that if you're new, you should start with simple projects, not dive into one of the most difficult projects there is like Iron Man.

    So to sum up my post, it seems to me that no one has a problem with Pep in general, since it's simply a tool. What is frustrating is when people surrender to one of the most artistic, educational, and down right interesting steps of any build and decide to just piece together their project from the printer. I'm sorry if this offends anyone, that is DEFINITELY not my intent, but this issue of Pep work has been on my mind as well. It seems to me that this attitude will continue on far into the future and as 3-d printing becomes more accessible, we'll see more people simply printing someone else's designs and saying "Done"
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
    elro likes this.

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