Your first builds

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


rescue542

Member
I have been wanting to start into making prop replicas like the amazing ones I’ve seen all of you all make. However, I have no tools other than your basic set for around the house (so far). So any project seems large and daunting especially since I am not an artistic person. So my questions for the masses is this, what was your first project that you saw through to completion? What techniques did you feel you needed to really learn that has helped you through making your first project that you continue to use? I’m looking to get inspiration for my first projects and get an idea of where to start for extra tool gathering and skills needed for future projects.

Thank you
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

JFB64

Well-Known Member
My first builds were Star Trek props built using cardboard and crayons done way back in the 70s. I would start with a small well executed kit. Something that is relatively easy to assemble and paint. Search out how to videos on YouTube, start with Adam Savages "One" day builds. He has loads of advice for all skill levels. As far as tools are considered, I would start with good lay out and measuring tools, scales, squares, protractors, ect. and various hobby knives and saws. I could make this post pages long but I have to leave for work. The the most important thing you will need however is patients. Don't expect great results on the first project. Let your skills and tool box develop. AND HAVE FUN.
 

ScoobiJohn

Active Member
i started by modifying a nerf gun - not much more than a screw driver and some paint needed, as for tools going forward - let your projects answer that - buy what you need to get the job done (is a slippery slope and may result in bankruptcy :D)
 

rescue542

Member
My first builds were Star Trek props built using cardboard and crayons done way back in the 70s. I would start with a small well executed kit. Something that is relatively easy to assemble and paint. Search out how to videos on YouTube, start with Adam Savages "One" day builds. He has loads of advice for all skill levels. As far as tools are considered, I would start with good lay out and measuring tools, scales, squares, protractors, ect. and various hobby knives and saws. I could make this post pages long but I have to leave for work. The the most important thing you will need however is patients. Don't expect great results on the first project. Let your skills and tool box develop. AND HAVE FUN.
Kits sound more my speed right now. I haven’t put together any kind of model or anything in probably 30 years. I’ll have to dig around and see what I can find.
 

joberg

Master Member
Depending on what your genre is (Sci-Fi, props of any kind, etc...) you`ll find your tools when the need will appear during construction.
I know, it`s a bit backward, but it`s true most of the time. My first build was a flying saucer, using two paper plates, an airfix pilot and a clear dome (I was 7 at the time:lol:).
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

rescue542

Member
Depending on what your genre is (Sci-Fi, props of any kind, etc...) you`ll find your tools when the need will appear during construction.
I know, it`s a bit backward, but it`s true most of the time. My first build was a flying saucer, using two paper plates, an airfix pilot and a clear dome (I was 7 at the time:lol:).
I found a couple of plastic kits on Etsy that seem good. One is Decker’s gun from the original bladerunner and the other is Boba Fett’s new pistol. Both are 3D printed kits. So I would need to sand, paint and assemble them. The painting is the scariest part for me
 

Starbase101

Sr Member
For my son's Halloween and FanX cosplay costumes a few years ago I made my first from-scratch props with 3D printing. The first was a Stargate Zat'nik'tel from a Thingiverse file which needed a bit of modeling rework in order for it to print (typical quality of many Thingiverse items). It was smoothed out with Bondo glazing putty and painted with Rust-oleum rattle-cans.
DSC05388.JPG

Zat3.jpg


It's not hinged or anything, just a static prop because time was short. He also wanted a GDO and there weren't any good 3D models anywhere online for this so I created my own from scratch. Two simple LED bookmark reading lights from Dollar Tree light up the buttons and screen.
GDO1.png

GDO2.jpg

GDO6.JPG


That was a busy time because during the same 30-day period he wanted a Jack Cooper costume from the video game Titanfall 2, which was mostly scratch-built and a much larger project than the Daniel Jackson costume. We were up until 2am finishing the helmet electronics before driving to Salt Lake City the next day for FanX. Down-to-the-wire enough? Nope, stopped at Walmart in SLC to buy additional materials for final assembly in the hotel room!
DSC05476.JPG


I don't like doing rush-jobs like these, especially since not having a lot of prop-making experience, so it's been nice lately with my Star Trek office makeover project being able to go at a much slower pace (no holiday or convention date deadlines).
 
Last edited:

JFB64

Well-Known Member
Painting is not as daunting as you might think. But it does require lots of patience. If you are going to mask off areas, taping is very tedious but when done properly the results are worth the effort. I use Tamiya sprays. They come in great colors, go on well and the small cans are easy to hold and maneuver. The down side is they can be very expensive especially on a big project. The expense is worth it for me because of the results I get compared to when I used hardware store paint.
 

joberg

Master Member
I found a couple of plastic kits on Etsy that seem good. One is Decker’s gun from the original bladerunner and the other is Boba Fett’s new pistol. Both are 3D printed kits. So I would need to sand, paint and assemble them. The painting is the scariest part for me
Practice your paint on mock-up pieces, e.g: a bunch of plastic panels glued together. Spray them flat, or standing (to avoid runs). When spray-painting the "less is more" kind of technique. Take your time, one thin coat at the time. For certain paints/finishes you'll have leave the first coat to dry before re-applying the second, third, etc...Patience is key in this hobby;)
 

rescue542

Member
Well all these replies have given me the confidence to start. I found a guy that is 3D printing the repainted Boba Fett armor and blasters. I’ll be buying the EE-3 and pistol along with the helmet at the end of the week. So once it all gets here I’ll have bought the sandpaper, filler and spray filler/primer. I’m excited and nervous but I will heed the biggest suggestion from everyone…taking my time with it. Patience is not always one of my traits lol. But thank you everyone for all of the input, it’s been a huge help
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top