WSJ article on Hollywood, props and 3D printing

Discussion in 'Entertainment and Movie Talk' started by zenix, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. zenix

    zenix Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    2,090
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
    kenlandrum likes this.
  2. jcoffman99

    jcoffman99 Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    2,466
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    Can't read it without signing in. :(
     
  3. PHArchivist

    PHArchivist Master Member

    Trophy Points:
    4,710
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    Thanks for posting! Do my OCD side a favor and get that extra "R" out of your title ;)
     
    kenlandrum likes this.
  4. third3ye

    third3ye Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

    Trophy Points:
    1,605
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    You can get around the WSJ block by doing an internet search for the article title.

    Personally I think most if not all of the studios won't lift much of a finger when it comes to 3D printing and IP infringement. Yes there are some lost sales to consumers who want a replica or scaled figure sooner than when the licensed market can provide, but how large of that market would've waited to buy a licensed product is highly questionable, so that's not lost sales there. Moving over to a customer retention standpoint, there's a sizable portion of collectors on this forum who would rather wait and pay a higher price for a licensed 100% SA prop replica. There's also a lot of 3D printed items that license holders would never touch anyway since they're not profitable, so that's not lost business to them. 3D printing tech is great for static objects but has a long way to go in creating the same level of quality with moving and electronic parts as the toy manufacturers. If anything this movement could hurt licensed prop manufacturers but studio royalty revenues for the collectible category is actually quite small. If, and a big if, 3D printing starts hurting mass market toy sales, then studios are gonna start hitting the panic button and siccing their lawyers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015
    Riceball likes this.
  5. Bogleo

    Bogleo Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    816
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    kenlandrum , What do you think about this?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2018
  6. kenlandrum

    kenlandrum Sr Member

    Trophy Points:
    1,340
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    Yes I'm selling the kit files to print your own tfa blaster. MY representation of the blaster. Not a physical product but the digital files. Go onto eBay and type in stormtrooper armor. Fan made props are the studios best friend. Take the 501st... These guys spend hundreds if not thousands of their own cash on top notch prop replicas that help promote a franchise. The article touched on many aspects of 3d printing including the toy market. But when it comes to fan made props I think they view this as a huge asset... Free fan advertisement!
     
    Riceball, skylu3Design and Bogleo like this.
  7. cboath

    cboath Master Member

    Trophy Points:
    3,276
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    Some of the comments didn't hold back on him, thats for sure. I can understand charging to help keep the onslaught at bay if that was the reason. Have to say, seems a mistake to tell the author he started charging for it. Interesting to see if a C&D arrives at the doorstep or not.

    As for the future of it...there's nothing illegal about me going down to home depot and buying everything I need to build out any number of props. I can build whatever I want for myself. The line only gets crossed if I start selling finished copyright product to others ostensibly.

    Honestly, i don't see 3D printers getting to the point of being cheaper than ordering from amazon or going to Toys 'r us though for another decade, if then. I'm kind of with the author, laws need to change. You can't use 1920's law in the 21st century - it's really apples and oranges. I'm saying I know what it needs changed to, but it needs updated. If not, i think you're going to see consumer patent trolls for lack of a better term. People buying up licenses that have been defunct decades simply to sue people for infringement.

    I disagree with a part of the article though, CD's never really offered any protection at all. If i borrowed a CD, i could easily copy it to tape well before CD writers were available to the public. You could always copy tapes prior to that as well. About what? 5 years after CDR's debuted to the public the price started getting close to what it needed to be to burner everything to disc instead of tape. Even at that it was still lie 5 bucks per CDR. By the time of napster it was still 2ish IIRC.

    Where there's a will, there's a way. I'd like to think that perhaps they've learned that the harder they fight it, the harder people wish push back. Start suing everyone under the sun and it'll turn on you, no question.

    If you want to take the real premise of the article to be that someday 3d printers will be ubiquitous in homes around the world and it'll be cheaper to print a toy as opposed to buy it, fine. I think toy companies are largely to blame with inflated license prices with 3 3/4" crossing $10 is ridiculous. The point WILL come where it'll take no real talent to make the model. The software exists now where you could take multiple views of a character in a movie and the software can construct a 3D textured model of them. It's not that great in quality, but it's do-able now. Jump ahead 10-15 years and those models should be pretty * good. The printer will still have to get good enough to paint the model as it's printing, which I can see will eventually happen. The RIAA stopped suing everyone under the sun because it didn't work. They joined the party and worked the system. Toy companies and studios will have to learn to do the same.

    - - - Updated - - -

    You're very right. However, the powers that be tend to take notice when someone admits to doing so. They very well may do nothing. I can't see it being a dent in their pockets whatsoever. At the same time, you can't be stunned if they elect to do something.
     
    Riceball and kenlandrum like this.
  8. Bogleo

    Bogleo Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    816
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    I think that the author doesn't realize how much time it takes to make a quality 3D file. Sure, the software exists to generate a 3D model from pictures, but it's hardly comparable to the quality of a model made through time and effort. I imagine it took Ken maybe 20-50 hours to model the TFA blaster.

    Also, the quality of a 3D print fresh off the bed is not very close to a licensed replica. It requires quite a few hours to get a 3D print to a smooth finish. Most people doing runs of helmets from 3D prints are smoothing, molding and casting it.

    I don't really see how 3D printers will lose them money. For example, in the prop community, I think most people would rather buy a replica helmet than buy a toy, or wait longer and pay more for a licensed replica.
     
    kenlandrum likes this.
  9. cboath

    cboath Master Member

    Trophy Points:
    3,276
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    The point isn't now, though, it's in the future. In the future, yes, you'll likely be able to use a series of photo's to generate a dead on model of something seen on screen that will have * near screen accurate quality.Whether that's 10, 20, or more years down the road is beside the point. The question i think they were trying to get to is 'what happens then'. The high end collectible market doesn't make a tiny dent in the profitability of a movie. If you're counting on that money, your movie likely blows massive chunks.

    Toys - on the other hand - are a separate issue. That's a market they do count on for a number of movies (some you gotta wonder why), but they do. SW is the prime example. Hasbro coughed up enough money for the toy license that all 3 movies turned a profit before the first one was released.

    I'm not sure how threatened toys get though, because a toy isn't something you can pull off the screen and print - regardless of your software. Movable parts and all and whatnot. As Bog points out, that design isn't instant. Someone has to take the time to make the file properly to hand out. And even at that point, you have to figure the cost of the printer and materials and time spent vs picking it up at the store.

    It IS something studios should think about now, You need to plan for the future. But they've got a a minimum of a decade before it's an actual concern and likely longer than that. 20 years?
     
    Riceball, kenlandrum and Bogleo like this.
  10. Bogleo

    Bogleo Well-Known Member

    Trophy Points:
    816
    Re: WSJ article on Hollywood, proprs and 3D printing

    Very good points. I just wanted to point out that my name isn't really Bog, Bogleo is just a nickname. :lol
     

Share This Page