Wow! That movie was EXACTLY like the book!

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Bobtherocker

Well-Known Member
A Clockwork Orange is pretty literal.
Well, it would be had Kubrick not read the American version that omits the final chapter where Alex finally outgrows his sociopathic urges through free will and not brainwashing and as the book is sort of about redemption through free will the film generally falls flat in that regard.
 

Probe Droid

Master Member
Yes, but it's very loyal to the American edition of the book, which is the one people had read at the time the film was made.
 

JD

Master Member
I don't think it's possible to have a movie that's exactly like the book.

They're totally different experiences.
 

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Probe Droid

Master Member
Quote:
Originally Posted by Probe Droid
Is there any such thing?

"EXACT?" No. But I know what he means. Nothing left out, altered, or re-arranged. Obviously you can't help that people will envision things differently though.
That's my point, does the film exist that includes 100% of everything from the book?
 

0neiros

Master Member
Macarthur Park. I mean the scene where Someone Left a cake out in the Rain, I just lost it, I mean It took so long to bake it, I just couldn't take it, and I'll never have this recipe again...Oh Nooooo.
 

StevenRogers84

Sr Member
Macarthur Park. I mean the scene where Someone Left a cake out in the Rain, I just lost it, I mean It took so long to bake it, I just couldn't take it, and I'll never have this recipe again...Oh Nooooo.
Books with pictures don't count. :lol
Okay ........ :lol I would like an exception made for cycle of the werewolf which translated very well into Silver Bullet. It is a novel, but has some great pics by Bernie throughout the Stand and the movie series was pretty close as well I feel. I am just waiting for a movie of Gerald's Game!
 

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cayman shen

Master Member
Well, it would be had Kubrick not read the American version that omits the final chapter where Alex finally outgrows his sociopathic urges through free will and not brainwashing and as the book is sort of about redemption through free will the film generally falls flat in that regard.
Ugh, I HATE that ending. "Hey, it's ok to kill and rape, all part of being a teenager. You'll outgrow it." Normally I'd support the author, but Burgess needed someone to tell him when to end. The American version is so much less limp.
 

Funky

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
"EXACT?" No. But I know what he means. Nothing left out, altered, or re-arranged. Obviously you can't help that people will envision things differently though.
That's what I was going for. You hit it right on the head. :thumbsup
 

Bobtherocker

Well-Known Member
Ugh, I HATE that ending. "Hey, it's ok to kill and rape, all part of being a teenager. You'll outgrow it." Normally I'd support the author, but Burgess needed someone to tell him when to end. The American version is so much less limp.
I don't think he meant it quite in that way. As the book deals with mindless violence from teenage thugs so it also deals with government sanctioned violence against the people and more importantly the states use of aggressive methods to cure the ills of society with brute force and brainwashing traversing the idea that one should ultimately show some form of remorse for ones actions to be allowed back into society.
The 'real' ending is about redemption. Alex finally sees the error of his ways. It's certainly not saying you will gain deliverance from sin through maturity alone.

Anyway, to get back on topic.
I don't think I've ever seen a film that is EXACTLY like the book, however I do agree that Misery comes pretty darn close.
I'm a massive fan of the Aubrey/Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian (Master and Commander) and although the far side of the world is an amalgam of a number of books in that series I think Peter Weir did a fantastic job of capturing on film what O'Brian put to paper.
 

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Zombie_61

Master Member
Dances With Wolves. Except for nearly an hour's worth of scenes that were removed to make the theatrical release only three hours long, and perhaps a word or two of dialogue, the movie was extremely faithful to Michael Blake's novel.
 

Mercury

Sr Member
I only recently read 1984 after my daughter had me get it for a school assignment. After reading it I looked up the movie on Netflix. While I thought it was dead on as far as what was filmed, I felt it was a condensed version. Which it had to be, I guess but I enjoyed the book more.
 

ed209

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I can't think of any I have ever seen where the book and movie matched up.

Sad.

One I have wished they would make is Without Remorse by Tom Clancy. The book was incredible, but it didn't have Jack Ryan as the main character, so they will probably never make it.
I've been hoping they would make a movie based on this book since I first read it! Incredible character and great story.

I would say "Silence of the Lambs" is pretty spot on to the book and so is "Red Dragon". In the movie version of "Red Dragon" they added more of Lecter's character for the movie audience, but everything even the dialog was very much from the book.

Another one is Ken Follet's "The Pillars of the Earth", which they made into a miniseries. My only wish is they would have aged the characters more, but as far as story goes it was almost exact.
 

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