TOS Enterprise-1/1000 kit by Polar Lights

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by trekriffic, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Hi everyone! These are some in-progress shots on my 1/1000 scale build of the Polar Lights kit.
    This will be the production series version of this kit and is being constructed as part of the Group Build over on The Tholian Web forum.


    Just so you all know, this image taken from the 2010 SOTL calendar is kind of what I'm shooting for.
    As much as possible anyway given the limitations of this kit.

    [​IMG]

    Shown here are various parts scavenged from booklights I found at the local Dollar Tree store.
    Four of the 1.5V batteries, wiring, metal contacts (one with and one without a spring), and slide switch will be used to construct an internal battery pack so the finished model will not need an external power source. Each nacelle will have a reflector behind the LED in each bussard.
    The lights will be static which should look nice for photographing.


    [​IMG]
    The finished battery pack made from the booklight parts and Evergreen and clear acrylic tubing is wired up and attached with CA to the back of the deflector housing.
    I won't go into details about all the material I had to remove from the inside of the secondary hull to accomodate all the battery parts and wiring but, believe me, it was a lot!
    Brass tabs at the front of the battery pack mate to slots cut into the secondary hull and the housing turns to lock into place.


    [​IMG]
    A high brightness white LED is wired between the upper and lower sensor domes in the primary hull.
    This LED will later be painted with fluoresent white acrylic paint so it spreads it's glow evenly around the interior much like an incandescent light bulb would.


    [​IMG]

    Wires are soldered to the LEDs in each nacelle.
    The LEDs are painted with white fluoresent and orange acrylic paint.


    [​IMG]

    A wire cage or "spider" is constructed using 30 gauge solid wire and a clear styrene disk.
    This will be inserted into the lower saucer sensor dome to give it the "pie slice" look seen in several fan made images which I have come to admire.


    [​IMG]
    The cage after insertion into the lower dome. The insides of the sensor domes are painted with white fluorescent acrylic so they will have a nice even glow with the light on. Fiber strands are run to the lower running lights.

    [​IMG]

    I didn't care for the look of the kit molded "nipple" on the lower saucer dome so I used the other dome in the kit (the one provided for use in building the pilot versions) and drilled out a small hole in the center. Then I turned some aluminum bar stock at high speed on my dremel and made a tiny round bead with a tiny shaft using my scribing tool. Then I glued it into the hole in the center of the lower sensor dome. This is the location of the ion pod in my opinion. Some may disagree but, for the sake of this build, it's the ion pod!

    [​IMG]

    Upper port and lower starboard running lights were turned on my dremel using red and clear acrylic rod. Looking at some great still shots of the studio model I left them as globes rather than hemisphers sitting up slightly above the surface of the model.

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    Work on the bussards involved making a brass template for use in cutting strips of adhesive-backed aluminum foil to make the fan blades to stick to the dome inserts. The template will allow me to make each fan blade identical to the other. The inserts have had about 1/8" removed from the backside to accomodate the LED reflector. The ridges for the fan blades were also sanded flat as the fit was too tight otherwise; I have cracked a few bussard domes in the past so I knew this going in.

    [​IMG]
    Light test after painting the interior of the bussard insert with transparent turn-signal amber enamel followed by red acrylic paint thinned with alcohol and allowed to pool in the center. The outer bussard domes were previously frosted on the inside with Floquil clear flat.

    [​IMG]

    The stern beacon over the shuttle bay doors was the wrong shape and you could see the square slot in the kit part for mounting to the tab on the hull so I made a new one from scratch. Then I took brass tubing and ground a bevelled edge with the dremel before slicing it on my mini-cutoff saw. Much better in my opinion.

    [​IMG]

    Then I sliced the acrylic rod off below the metal collar using a miter saw, hollowed out the inside with a round router bit, and painted it with white fluorescent paint tinted with just a hint of blue. My fingers almost cramped up from holding this tiny piece as I worked on it.

    [​IMG]


    So, as of this writing, all hull seams have been filled and scraped and puttied and the majority of the sanding is complete. I did fill in the kit scribed lines in the front of the dorsal and on the front undersides of the nacelles with red putty. These areas will eventually be masked off and painted a slightly darker, greener shade of the hull color. Left to attach are the bussard domes, hangar bay beacon, intercoolers and reactor loops, and end caps on the nacelles. The deflector dish will be attached last and may be left removeable after the rest of the ship is finished.
    It should be ready for priming with gray rattle can Tamiya primer tomorrow.
    With any luck I should be finished by New Years.:confused

    Thanks for reading ! Comments welcome!
    :)
     
  2. JMChladek

    JMChladek Sr Member

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    Very nice work! The lighting tweaks should make it really shine. In my case, while I like lighted projects, I never have been able to work up the nerve to do that with a model as small as the 1/1000 model. But I have seen some excellent projects done from it, INCLUDING this one. :)


    The ion pod location makes sense, although remastered Trek established it as being one of the exposed dome lighted areas on the back of the secondary hull near the shuttle bay (they did a tight shot on it in the new effects shots). Still, since TOS never fleshed out exactly where it was, it could be in the sensor dome. Or, the dome could also contain the photon launcher.

    What is this Tholian Web forum of which you speak? I'd be curious to see some of the other GB projects as well.
     
  3. glorbes

    glorbes Active Member

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    Looking forward to seeing this come together. Your previous work would indicate that this'll be another finished masterpiece. Its already looking great.
     
  4. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Here's a link to the Group Build finished pics. So far 3 ships have been completed and posted in the finished thread:
    The Tholian Web • View topic - Original Constitution Classes

    This link details the rules and signup list for the Group Build:
    The Tholian Web • View topic - Original 12 Starships

    I'm signed up to build the Enterprise and the Defiant.
     
  5. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Nice work. I took an easy way out to do the neck, engineering hull and upper and lower primary hull.... I just cut big sections out laid clear package tape over the areas, to conform to the shape and filled with clear, sanded, masked, opaqued, painted, unmasked and so on... A lot of work for such a small kit.... Still, can't wait to see more.
     
  6. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Today I did some more work on the front of the secondary hull and the deflector housing. Used a small miter saw to slice off the inner half of the rectangular tabs on each side at the front of the secondary hull and glued those pieces to the sides of the deflector housing; these would be at the 3 and 9 o'clock positions on the perimeter of the housing. I needed to do this as the tabs are designed to lock onto the tapered housing and lock it in place which meant they had to be pried apart every time I pulled out the battery pack. Then I cut a round piece of thin styrene sheet with a hole in the center to match the diameter of the battery pack front collar and glued it to the front of the secondary hull so when the deflector housing is twisted and locked into position I get a nice tight fit with no gaps. Turned out well. Using AVES I puttied around the tabs and all around the ring behind the deflector housing. Tomorrow I'll sand any rough spots.

    I also repainted the inside of the little stern hangar bay beacon using a big rattle can of Krylon "Celery" lacquer I bought for half off at Michaels. This is a light bluish green color and looks very close to the color of the lit dome on the studio model. This is also a good color to use when painting the command pod, boom, and lower engineering hull surfaces on the Klingon D-7 battlecruiser but, boy, is it runny! Will definitely need a light primer coat underneath it when the time comes to build the reissued D-7.

    I also glued the bussards to the front of each nacelle. They look AWESOME lit up!

    The last thing I did was fix a rattle I was hearing from inside the sealed saucer. I'm * about things rattling around inside my models; I just can't stand it! :angry
    My assumption was it was the small clear piece I had glued in front of the LED to hold the ends of the fiber strands from the lower running lights; it had come loose once before prior to sealing up the hull but how to fix the rattle without breaking open the saucer? Simple. I drilled a hole in the top of the saucer as close as I could estimate where this piece was and squeezed in a liberal amount of Super Thin CA thru the hole and tilted the hull from one side to another to spread it around inside the model. That did the trick as whatever was rattling around stuck to the glue and NO MORE RATTLE! The hole was sealed with AVES and once it dries I will sand it flush with the hull.

    So I figure tomorrow will be the day for priming and maybe the first coat of the basecoat. I have a new quart of ACE Hardware "Shady Cove" oil-based enamel to try out. It comes closest to "concrete" on the gray scale (at least according to Paul Newitt) with just a hint of olive to it. I figured it was cheaper to buy it premixed rather than try mixing it up using those relatively expensive little bottles of Model Master paints; a quart of "Shady Cove" ran me 9 bucks at the hardware store and I figure it'll last me forever considering the size of the models I build.

    Next post I'll have some pics I promise!
    :)
     
  7. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Sounds like an ingenious way to build a lightable kit without having to drill out all the tiny windows on this small kit! Extraordinarily inventive on your part sir. Cudos!
     
  8. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    I'm honored you think so! :thumbsup
     
  9. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Awwww Shucks..... Try it, it works. You can use the stickers to mask off all of the windows and use a drill bit the same size as the round windows to just touch the kit after it's all painted and sealed. Makes for a very interesting conversation piece. People will wonder and ask.... How did you get all of those holes in exactly the right place... How did you do that? :)
     
  10. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Another thing I did was to paint the existing running lights with transparent paint, for the red and green and leave the white as they are and all you need is one small bright white led hooked up to a basic flasher and you can run the running lights and anti collision lights all with one LED for the two circuits each and a little fiber-optic, which I can see you are already using. Bam! You've got an easy, less complicated circuit and in the right lighting it will look as good as a 22", or 32.46" ship. :)
     
  11. Tremas

    Tremas Sr Member

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    :love:love:love

    That's going to be sweet!
     
  12. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Yes. I had thought of something similar but decided on this piece just being a static display. After I finish this one though I plan on building the Defiant as seen in the Enterprise episode "In a Mirror, Darkly." For that one I'll be using the vinyl aztecing masks I bought online to give her the full aztec treatment (it will be very subtle). I will also be using the CultTVMan nacelle lighting kit I bought years ago. It has a chaser circuit board for each engine wired to a disc with 12 red surface mount LEDs that simulate the turbine spin. I also will be using a 555 flasher board for the running lights a friend of mine built for me; he's since passed away so I plan on making a diagram showing how he wired this board so in future I can replicate it myslef. So that ship will be fully tricked out.
     
  13. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Coolbeans, they both sound like they're going to be awesome builds. Can't wait to see more. Believe it or not, I designed a circuit like the one that Steve sells and discussed it at length over at Starship Builder years ago, but all references have been scrubbed from the net. I wonder if I can find that by using the wayback machine? At any rate, you're doing a fine job, looking forward to updates.
     
  14. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Update with pics!

    I glued the bussards in place and lit her up. These pics are a tad overexposed but you get the idea...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Pics from today...

    I made a round headed post to fit inside the flight deck control beacon,drilled a countersunk hole into the upper cowling directly above the door control booth,inserted the mounting post into the hole and glued it with CA,glued the beacon dome to the mounting post with crystal clear craft glue, then puttied around the base of the metal collar with AVES. I'm going to start calling it the flight deck rather than the hangar bay since someone pointed out that the hangar is where craft are stored prior to being moved to the flight deck. In this case the Enterprise's hangar is below the flight deck.


    [​IMG]

    Basically ready for priming. Still need to mask the stern beacon and the running lights. The deflector housing will be unlocked, masked and left dangling for priming separate from the rest of the ship. The horizontal inner nacelle grills were painted and masked. I used gunmetal metalizer as a base then brushed on aluminum metalizer. I didn't think to snap a photo but the aluminum over the dark gunmetal looks fantastic!


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    Paint for the main hull color...
    [​IMG]

    There are a few other lights I might add after the first primer coat but I'll leave what those might be to your imagination.

    Thanks for reading. Comments welcome!
     
  15. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Woohoo, can't wait to see this done.
     
  16. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Thanks Underdog. I didn't plan it but that ready for primer bow shot under the saucer is almost the same exact pose as Drexler's image from the calendar! Funny...
     
  17. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    " I love it when a plan comes together..."

     
  18. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Pics from this weekend...

    Masked and ready for the first coat of primer:


    [​IMG]

    I wasn't satisfied with just using a decal for the impulse engine vents so I cut a piece of thin styrene sheet using an impulse engine from another 1/1000 kit as a template to trace the outline. Then I and cut out the rectangles with an exacto thin chisel blade and drilled the tiny center hole before gluing it to the face of the kit part. This is a nice improvement in my opinion and really defines the vent openings:

    [​IMG]

    After priming I noticed several spots that needed more sanding so I dobbed on red putty as needed and sanded and sanded until I was satisfied everything was uber smooth. Based on the photos below, I'm quite satisfied that no seams are visible. After a quick go over with 600 grit to ensure absolute smoothness she'll be ready for the initial basecoat:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    Thanks for reading!
     
  19. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    It looks good, but I'm sorry.... at this scale, it's really hard to come up with good detail.
     
  20. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    True. Showing much detail is rather a challenge at this scale. Conversely, one could also argue that, as elegant and iconic as Matt Jeffery's creation is, there really isn't a wealth of detail to show with this ship. And that's just fine with me.
     
  21. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    So I was checking for light bleed last night and noticed some minor leakage around the rim of the bussards.
    I should be able to sort that out by applying some more Mr Surfacer with a brush. This will be followed by some light sanding with 600 grit paper and even finer grit polishing pads. Then I'll shoot the entire model with a coat of Testors flat black before airbrushing the first basecoat of Shady Cove enamel.
    Using the airbrush should allow me the control I need to have some of the black showing thru to leave faint weathering streaks.
    After the initial coat dries I'll be using Alan Sinclair's blueprint of the upper saucer to draw the gridlines using a mechanical pencil.
    I printed the drawing off onto 8.5 x 11 inch paper and then zoomed out to 124% on the copier at work to match the 5" diameter of the kit.
    I'll cut it out and lay it down on the model then make tick marks along the rim of the saucer where the gridlines terminate.
    I'll do the same thing along the perimeter of the B-C deck housing then use a piece of styrene strip to draw the radial lines.
    The tick marks will be erased before more paint is applied.
    The circular lines will be drawn with a compass.
    I don't want the compass needle to mar the upper sensor dome so I'll cut a short length of tubing to fit snugly around the perimeter of the bridge (with a slot cut out where the turbolift is) and glue a round, flat piece of styrene to the top of the tubing with a hole dead center for the compass needle to rest in.
    The tubing will need to fit snugly enough around the bridge deck without gluing of course.
    The compass needle will thus rest just above the level of the dome without touching it.
    Once the gridlies are drawn I'll seal with a light spray of Dullcote and use them as a guide to mask off and paint the rust ring with Testors Rust and lightly scribe lines where the four rectangular upward facing saucer window decals will go.
    Then I'll mask off and paint the front of the dorsal and the area under the front of each nacelle behind the three flux constrictors with a mix of the hull color and Intermediate Blue.
    The rust ring, gridlines, and weathering streaks will then be muted down to be very subtle after another thinned down layer of the basecoat.

    As far as the nacelle encaps, the rear retangles on each side of the nacelles, and the impulse engine vent assembly and accelerator on the back of the upper saucer, I plan on painting those a 50/50 mix of Testors Medium Gray and Euro Grey as Medium Gray seems too light and Euro Gray seems a little too dark.
    The slot on the inside of the nacelles will probably be painted Medium Gray as they appear to be a shade lighter than the rest.
    These will be painted after the second basecoat has been applied to the rest of the ship.

    I'll allow 2-3 days for the paint to cure before hitting her with Glosscote, then apply decals, wait a day and spray with more Glosscote, and then finally 3-4 coats of Dullcote. Then I'll unmask the clear bits, clean up any "holidays" (hopefully there won't be any) and call her done!
    Well, all except for the base which will be a resin U.S.S. Enterprise base I bought from The Model Base Guy years ago for this build.
    Here's a pic:
    [​IMG]


    Comments on my color choices are welcome! Thanks for reading!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
  22. JMChladek

    JMChladek Sr Member

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    This is looking VERY good. I think your detailing is coming out quite well IMHO. Indeed Matt's design isn't detail heavy, but there are some nice subtleties in it (some of which can't be seen except on a large model). But once it gets painted and decalled, I think everything is going to pop quite nicely at that point as while you can't see the subtleties, enough hints will be present to make it appear as though it is there.
     
  23. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Updates from last night...

    So after work last night I skipped (errrr... make that strided purposefully) out to the garage and spent about an hour on the old girl.

    First thing I wanted to do before spraying her with Testors black enamel was to drill holes for the lights on the spine over the shuttle bay and the tops of the bussard collars.
    I figured it would be easier to see what I was drilling against a gray exterior as opposed to one painted black.

    For the spine lights, I drew a line down the center of a piece of Tamiya masking tape and using my drafting calipers took measurements off Alan Sinclair's blueprint (which I had previously blown up to match the size of the model) and transferred the location of the three tiny lights onto the tape using the front edge of the stern beacon as my reference point.
    After that I laid the tape down as close to the centerline of the secondary hull as I could using my drafting calipers to measure where the pencil line was centering it from the front edge of the hangar beacon, between the nacelle struts, and up to the centerline of the dorsal.
    Then I took my straight pointed dental pick and pressed it thru the tape where I'd marked where the lights should be leaving indents for drilling into the model...


    [​IMG]


    I removed the tape and drilled with my pinvise.
    The center hole of the three spine lights is about 33% larger than the other two.
    The holes on the bussard collars are the same size as the middle hole of the spine lights...


    [​IMG]

    Here she is after the black paint had dried...

    [​IMG]

    And after giving her a light sanding to smooth everything out.
    Of course, she'll need dusting off after this.
    Sanding really attracts any crap floating around in the air doesn't it?


    [​IMG]

    So tomorrow it'll be time for the basecoat to be airbrushed.
    Before I do that, though, I'll mask off the areas I want left black such as the ridged baffles behind the bussard collars and the impulse engine vents.

    Once I'm done with the painting I'll turn clear green and red acrylic rod in my dremel and insert them into the holes I drilled out last night.
    I figure I'll just glue on the tiny teardrop shaped lights on the edge of the saucer outboard of the running lights.
    I'm not sure yet if I'll just use the decals for the blinkers on the sides of the shuttle bay or if I need to drill more holes and make those out of clear rod.
    If I do that I might as well turn some brass tubing for the metal collars around those lights.
    You can see them here...

    [​IMG]

    I'll probably make the bulbs for these as they don't sit flush to the surface like a decal would and I'm really trying to be a stickler for details on this build if you hadn't guessed that already! ;)

    Anyway, as always, thanks for reading along!
     
  24. robn1

    robn1 Master Member

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    Really looking nice! At that scale, the side dome lights could be done with a drop of clear epoxy.
     
  25. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    I turned the first of the side strobe lights on my dremel last night using a piece of .060 clear acrylic rod. I had to get it down to about .040 diameter.
    I also made a beveled collar from 1/16" diameter brass tubing using a round needle file to enlarge the inner diameter slightly for the "bulb" to poke through.
    The finished strobe is about the size of a grain of rice.
    Once I finish the second one, I'll try to take a picture of them next to something recognizable (perhaps a pencil tip) so you can get a sense of the scale.
    It's about the limit of smallness for me to be able to manipulate, even using my finest tweezers.
    I'll need to go even smaller though for the other lights.
     
  26. robn1

    robn1 Master Member

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    I'd go cross eyed doing that! Bet it looks great though.
     
  27. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    looking good, nice idea on using the dremel as a quickie lathe on small stuff. I've cordless drill and other in the same way. Keep on Trekkin! =/\= Can't wait to see this done.
     
  28. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    So Sunday I turned the second strobe light on my dremel/lathe. Turned out pretty good IIDSSM.
    Here's the stock piece of acrylic rod being turned to the correct diameter in the collete...


    [​IMG]

    Here's the 1/16" OD brass "collar" on my fingertip. Prior to slicing it off the tubing I bevelled the edges using a needle file...

    [​IMG]

    Here's the collar in place and ready for gluing onto the clear rod. I'll slice it off the stock with my miter saw... very carefully...

    [​IMG]

    The finished strobes next to a penny for comparison...

    [​IMG]

    Once I've got the basecoat on I'll glue them into the holes I've drilled into the hull with CA.
    I may put a small drop of fluorescent white paint on them too as they are unlit otherwise.


    :)
     
  29. robn1

    robn1 Master Member

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    Thanks for those extra large pics, or else I couldn't see it! Really nice work :thumbsup
     
  30. acereplicas

    acereplicas Member

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    Can't wait to see the final product! Keep up the good work!
     
  31. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    So went into work yesterday and visited the TrekCore site where I printed off this still from Space Seed.

    I'm using it to get the color just right on the leading edge of the dorsal. It looks to be bluish gray color to me.

    I'm going to do a few tests on a scrap piece of styrene sheet putting some of the hull color next to different formulations for the other color. I'll start with 3 parts hull color to 1 part Intermedate Blue and see if that gives me the slightly darker value I want. I also got a bottle of MM Azure Blue which is a light blue with a grey tint to it. I'll add a little of that in combination with the other two colors. I'll use the same color on the undersides of the nacelles in that scalloped area behind the flux constrictors.

    There is alo a lighter variation of this color on the trailing edge of the dorsal; it's very subtle and barely noticeable though.



    This should be fun!



    P.S. I never noticed this before but, at least in this picture, there seems to be a definite pattern to the weathering on the bussard dome collar. Not just random streaks but almost bullet shaped rounds pointing rearward spaced evenly around the circumference. Has anyone else ever noticed this?
     
  32. robn1

    robn1 Master Member

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    The color on the dorsal trailing edge may be a blue screen artifact, the aft edge of the nacelle pylons have the same color in that pic.

    The bussard weathering appears to be airbrushed streaks to me.
     
  33. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    It's possible the trailing edge of the dorsal could be blue screen wash. I think I'll still go ahead and paint it. It'll be the same light/dark value as the rest of the dorsal though with just a hint of blue gray added to be very, very subtle. Airbrushing the streaks on the nacelles is difficult in something this size-for me anyway.
    I'll probably opt for spraying the first basecoat, then a coat of dullcote, followed by weathering with gel inks and/or pastels, then another coat of the base thinned down so you can barely see the weathering.
     
  34. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Today's update...

    Did a little experimenting with different ratios of Shady Cove, Intermediate Blue, and Azure Blue to see what looked best next to the basecoat for the front and back edges of the connecting dorsal:

    [​IMG]

    I'm leaning towards using the fifth from the bottom on the righthand side for the front of the dorsal.
    It's about 8 parts Shady Cove to 1 part Azure Blue. Could even go a little lighter but it's close.
    Maybe 12 to 1 would be better.
    The trailing edge needs to be even lighter; leaning towards second from the top on the lefthand side-20 parts Shady Cove to 1 part Azure Blue.
    Again I'll probably go even lighter, say 25 to 1.
    Funny thing is I was thinking the two accent colors woudl give me a bluish tint but when combined with the slightly greenish tint of Shady Cove the hues lean more towards green or a neutral grey.


    Here's the Enterprise cleaned up, dusted, and ready for her first coat of Shady Cove.
    Like my homemade painting booth?
    I know, pretty fancy:


    [​IMG]

    I cut some thin strips of Tamiya tape and masked the grooves between the shuttle bay doors.
    Once basecoated and the tape is removed the slots will be black; I'll then spray them with a second thinner coat of the basecoat so the slots will be a light gray when done.
    The nacelle endcaps are masked as I don't want their grooves to disappear under multiple coats of the basecoat and the darker gray final coat (possibly a mix of Aggressor Gray and Euro Gray?) so they will stay masked until I give them their final paint coat.


    [​IMG]

    After airbrushing the first coat of Shady Cove.
    You can see why so many people think the Enterprise is white.
    She looks white in these photos but she's defintely a light gray color as is evident when you look at my experimental color chart at the beginning of this post:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Shady Cove is an oil-based gloss enamel so you have to allow 6-8 hours for drying time before handling.
    Hopefully I'll be able to do some light sanding with polishing pads tomorrow.
    Once it's good and dry I'll spray with Dullcote then draw the gridlines on the upper saucer and paint the rust ring.
    I'll also do a little weathering with pastels and gel ink pens. This will be followed with another thinned down spray of the basecoat.
    The rust ring, gridlines, and weathering needs to be very subtle at this scale.

    Here's the base I'm using. It's from The Model Base Guy. Tamiya primer went on very nicely.


    [​IMG]

    Next pics will be of the gridlines and the rust ring I think.

    Thanks for reading!
     
  35. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Updates from this weekend...

    So I figured the paint was finally dry enough and gave her a light spray with Dullcote on the upper saucer. Then I cut out the upper saucer from Alan Sinclair's blueprints (sized to fit the dimensions of the model) and taped it to the top of the saucer:
    [​IMG]

    I made a series of pencil marks around the base of the B-C deck and the saucer rim where the radial gridlines terminated:
    [​IMG]

    Then I removed the paper template and using a mechanical pencil and a length of Evergreen strip cut to size I drew the radial gridlines:
    [​IMG]

    Taking measurements from the blueprint I used a drafting compass to draw the circular gridlines:
    [​IMG]

    I didn't want the compass needle to mar the upper dome so I cut a short piece of acrylic tubing that fit perfectly over the bridge deck (with a slot cut out to accomodate the turboshaft bump) and glued a round piece of styrene to the top. This would serve as a nesting place for the compass needle. Then I taped it to the top of the B-C deck housing:
    [​IMG]

    The first few circles were too close in for the compass so I made a template from thin sheet using a circle template and used that for the first circle which had to be notched to the shape of the B-C deck rear. Then I used the circle template to make the next 2 circles. After that I used the compass:
    [​IMG]

    The saucer after drawing the gridlines:
    [​IMG]

    Masking tape was removed and any stray pencil marks were removed using a Magic Rub eraser:
    [​IMG]

    The rust ring was rubbed in using Tamiya pastel chalk and a foam applicator then sealed with Dullcote. Note that It doesn't go all the way around; this I confirmed by close examination of studio model pics and by what other Enterprise "experts" have written in other thread:
    [​IMG]

    Accent colors were brush painted on the front of the dorsal and lower front of the nacelles using a mix of the hull color and Azure Blue enamel. Some of the masking tape still needs to be removed around the flux constrictors in this pic:
    [​IMG]

    Lest anyone be alarmed in thinking I made the gridlines and accent colors too stark let me allay those fears; the colors you see now are not the finished product. I plan to mix up a thinned down batch of the basecolor (perhaps tinted a little more towards the green side with a few extra drops of olive drab and SAC bomber green) and airbrush it over the entire model with special emphasis on these areas to tone them down. When I'm done the gridlines and rust ring will be much more subtle and the other areas will be muted and somewhere between a bluish and greenish tint. To be honest, the main reason for drawing the gridlines was to make it easier to locate where the 4 rectangular windows go around the rim of the saucer.
    It also helped in positioning the rust "ring".

    So that's where I'm at right now. Comments welcome as always.

    :cool

    Oh... almost forgot... I finished painting the base. Just needs a coat or two of Future:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
    robn1 likes this.
  36. robn1

    robn1 Master Member

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    The base looks good. And that's a great job on the grid! Better than MR, and they had a much larger scale to work with. Can't wait to see it after it's toned down.
     
  37. jediknight0

    jediknight0 New Member

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    Truely impressive work.

    Such a small scale is hard to work with for details, yet you are doing an amazing job. The attention to detail (using a dremel as a lathe!) is most impressive.
     
  38. Underdog

    Underdog Sr Member

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    Awesomesauce! You make me want to finish another one, unfortunately, I have waaaaaaaaay to much on my plate. Brilliant work.
     
  39. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Thanks very much rob. If this is better than the gridlines on the MR then they seriously overcharged for that beast!
     
  40. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Thanks Jedi! The dremel as a lathe idea wasa something I tried 6 years ago when I built my 18 inch Enterprise. I'm sure I wasn't the first person to think of it though.
     
  41. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Thank you sir. I am honored!
     
  42. kahn1701

    kahn1701 Active Member

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    Great work.
    I love the pencil line work.
    I might jut try it on my BIG E.

    Thanks
     
  43. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    You'd need a big compass for that beast! Though if you have the skills to build in that scale I'd imagine you could make one from scratch yourself.
     
  44. kahn1701

    kahn1701 Active Member

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    341
    I think its worth a try..
    If it works you get a plug on my next video..LOL
    I'll see..

    Thanks for your support,
     
  45. glorbes

    glorbes Active Member

    Trophy Points:
    361
    You're squeezing a lot of awesomeness out of such a tiny kit. What wonderful detailing, and such a precise job on the saucer grid lines (and marked in with pencil...the way it should be!).
     
  46. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Here she is after being dirtied up with pastel chalk last night. I know, I know, it's ugly, but remember, this will be covered over with the final thinned down spray of the basecoat. The effect will be much more subtle than this when I'm done. I just had to give her some staining to look like she did on screen. I just can't seem to make one of these without weathering of some kind...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I should be able to give her her final shot of the basecoat this weekend and them I'll paint the darker grey bits.
     
  47. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Progress from today after overspraying with thinned down basecoat. The staining/weathering is pretty subtle now for the most part. Some areas a little too much so. After it dries I'll probably give it a once over with 600 grit sanding film to restore some of the weathering in certain areas. Alternatively I've had real good luck with subtle weathering using water-based gel ink pens. By and large, I'm satisfied with the upper saucer and warp nacelles. The secondary hull and under the saucer need just a little more weathering added back; although not too much. I'll also need to go back and repaint the accent tones on the front of the dorsal and behind and underneath the bussards-the overspray really washed those areas out. This time though I'lll add a little SAC Bomber Green in addition to Azure Blue to the mix with the hull color and go lighter.

    Anyway, here are the pics:


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  48. superDrool

    superDrool Sr Member

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    I had to check and see if someone else had this project going as well... sure enough! Well done so far, sir. I just came from Michael's Craft store with this as my wife and I (in tow) are on a TOS kick. So I'm going to follow some of your tricks to make it look life-like, but mostly the LED set up I was concerned with, as the scale is very small. I just wanted all the set in place LEDS to have one centered switch to turn everything on. But I like the idea of the grid and pastel, very nice! I'll be keeping tabs on the final outcome of this one. :)

    -Tony
     
  49. JMChladek

    JMChladek Sr Member

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    The idea of doing the grid lines is genious. Gotta love Tamiya tape for stuff like this.

    I admit I had some doubts about basecoat, pastel then basecoat, but it faded it back rather nicely. I might try something similar on my next E project.
     
  50. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    Update from this past weekend...


    Having finished the weathering with black gel ink, attention turned to the small lights that were overlooked by Polar lights when they designed the kit.
    I have seen many builds of this model kit that do not include these lights; nevertheless, they were there on the original Enterprise.
    Photos of the studio model support their existence and Alan Sinclair even shows them on his blueprints.
    These are incredibly tiny "bits" (as the Brits would say) in this scale and the work involved drilling tiny mounting holes with a pinvise and turning red, green, and clear acrylic rod on the dremel to the smallest of diameters using a scribing tool, needle files, and sanding sticks.
    In the case of the tiny lights on the upper saucer rim located outboard of the main flashing formation lights, the plastic was filed and sanded to a teardrop shape before being cut from the rod with an Xacto knife and glued in place with CA.

    Anyway, here are the pics...


    Bridge dome lights:
    [​IMG]

    These tiny lights are actually conical in shape and they light up very well on my model.

    Spine lights over the hangar bay:
    [​IMG]

    The outer tinier lights are greenish yellow and the center red light sticks up higher than you would expect.

    Port and starboard saucer lights next to the rim:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    These are teardrop shaped. Once in place a tiny brush was used to apply Testors Neon Red and Green enamel.

    Outer rim lights on the saucer rim itself:
    [​IMG]

    These don't light up so I'll paint them white.

    b]Nacelle bussard collar lights:[/b]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Without a doubt the most overlooked lights on the Enterprise. Apparently not even lit on the studio model; mine, however, are lit.
    So, purists could say my build is not 100% accurate to the original, but... I don't listen to rivet counters much...


    This sequence of photos shows how I installed the stern hangar bay warning strobe lights which I made from acrylic rod and brass tubing some weeks back prior to painting the hull...

    Soft wax adhesive is smeared on the tip of a flat toothpick and used to hold the strobe:
    [​IMG]

    A round toothpick is used to insert Testors styrene cement into the hole on each side of the hull:
    [​IMG]

    The strobe light is placed into the mounting hole:
    [​IMG]

    Strobes installed:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    These are not lit on my model, in fact, none of the lights in the engineering hull are lit; however, on my next build of this kit (the Defiant) I'll be using a 9 volt external battery which will give me more room (and a larger power budget) to play with lighting for the secondary hull. It would be great if I could have these light flash.

    So that's it for the tiny lights. The next thing I did was finish the spike on the deflector dish which had been replaced at the start of this build with brass rod. I had glued the tiny plastic tip from the kit spike (it's shaped like the mouth of a bugle with a ball in it's throat) to the end of the brass wire with CA. This was extremely delicate work as you can imagine and not something I would look forward to doing twice so... of course, the tip broke off when I was in the midst of painting and weathering the hull and flew off into the garage never to be found again. I was prepared to scavenge a new tip form one of my other 3 unbuilt 1/1000 kits but, after some thought, I decided a better fix would be to make the new tip from brass which i did using my dremal and brass tubing. So using my scribing tool I shaped a conical collar which fit right over the brass wire and stayed put with CA. I just need to make the little ball for the tip now. I'll probably make it from Tamiya epoxy putty and stick it onto the spike followed by some thin CA for added strength after it dries.:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I'll post some pics of the ship as she stands now.

    Next up will be glosscoting and decaling.
     

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