They're Just Encouraging Piracy

Cephus

Sr Member
Looks like they're doing it again, Warner Bros. Discovery is pulling digital content that people paid good money for as a tax write-off. Anyone who pays for digital content without a backup is a fool.

 

JediMichael

Master Member
Funny, just posted in the video game thread that google is shutting down its Stadia service, so anyone that paid for those games, or however it worked, will never be able to play them again. The advantage of a physical copy. Even games you download, as long as they are still on your harddrive would usually still be playable.
Never have used any of the digital movie services, but yeah, I'd be kinda annoyed to lose something I paid for that was meant to be kept.
 

Gimpdiggity

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Funny, just posted in the video game thread that google is shutting down its Stadia service, so anyone that paid for those games, or however it worked, will never be able to play them again. The advantage of a physical copy. Even games you download, as long as they are still on your harddrive would usually still be playable.
Never have used any of the digital movie services, but yeah, I'd be kinda annoyed to lose something I paid for that was meant to be kept.
At least Google is refunding people’s purchases that were made.

They have super deep pockets, though. I don’t feel many companies would do the same.
 

Pepperbone

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I buy less physical media than I used to, but when I find something good, I always get a hard copy. Especially music.

About 20 years ago I heard lecture from Lessig about copyrights and creative commons, and he was saying how at the dawn of digital music, the record industry tried to come up with a business model where album copies would no longer be available, and you'd have to pay each time you wanted to listen to a song. He also had some pretty damning things to say about Disney and how they acquired properties that were in the public domain.

The future will be interesting...
 

HeartBlade

Sr Member
I buy less physical media than I used to, but when I find something good, I always get a hard copy. Especially music.

About 20 years ago I heard lecture from Lessig about copyrights and creative commons, and he was saying how at the dawn of digital music, the record industry tried to come up with a business model where album copies would no longer be available, and you'd have to pay each time you wanted to listen to a song. He also had some pretty damning things to say about Disney and how they acquired properties that were in the public domain.

The future will be interesting...
Sounds like a fortune teller or someone really in the know if he knew the writing on the wall 20 years ago. Although too be fair, Disney acquiring IPs that were in the public domain and then copyrighting them has been their business model.

I dont think digital is automatically bad but you have to treat it like watching a movie in a theater. You are buying a ticket to see the movie once/a limited number of times. If you want to have ownership, you have to go physical. There is a thus a big tradeoff between convenience (saving a huge library in the cloud, being able to switch movies quickly, access to a ton of content at a fraction of the price) and ownership (will always be able to access the product as long as you own the software).

Corporations are doing a good job pushing subscription services and encouraging digital though.
 

Moviefreak

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I dont think digital is automatically bad but you have to treat it like watching a movie in a theater. You are buying a ticket to see the movie once/a limited number of times. If you want to have ownership, you have to go physical. There is a thus a big tradeoff between convenience (saving a huge library in the cloud, being able to switch movies quickly, access to a ton of content at a fraction of the price) and ownership (will always be able to access the product as long as you own the software).
That is how I have always viewed purchasing a digital download on Amazon Prime or other streaming services. To me, it is much like watching “movies on demand” through my cable provider. I pay and have access to watch it for 24 hours. The cable company is clear about that so nobody feels mislead. Maybe these streaming services need to reword the purchase so people realize it is a limited viewing and not a full-on purchase for life.
 

JPH

Sr Member
When laser disc were a craze, I remember hearing about "disc rot," where they would simply go bad with time.

Anyone remember watching Empire Strikes Back, over and over, watching a TIE fighter get hit by an asteroid and seeing what looked like a pilot tumble out?

I hope CD, DVDs and Blu-ray don't have a shelf life.

I prefer owning a physical copy of anything, that way you can watch it anytime, never hafta worry about a buffer.
 

HeartBlade

Sr Member
That is how I have always viewed purchasing a digital download on Amazon Prime or other streaming services. To me, it is much like watching “movies on demand” through my cable provider. I pay and have access to watch it for 24 hours. The cable company is clear about that so nobody feels mislead. Maybe these streaming services need to reword the purchase so people realize it is a limited viewing and not a full-on purchase for life.
The limited viewing might be there in small print or the ToA that no one reads lol.

Im sure these corporations have their bases covered to protect from being sued since alot of us really dont know what we are buying most of the time. (Amazon apparently has it hidden in their terms of use).

Might just be an issue of increasing consumer awareness which is fine as long as the option to buy permanently aka physical media, always remains an option. Apparently some services also provide the ability to download the film so you can consider it "owned" if you have the storage and download it.
 

ScourgiousJinx

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
These types of things are just going to keep happening until consumers say no. Movies are like books you should be able to purchase them individually and own them forever physically or digitally without subscribing to something or worrying about whether or not the format you have will work on the particular disc player or TV you own. What absolute insanity would ensue if we could only own books digitally or had to subscribe to services to be able to read them? Would not fly at all and neither should it for movies.
 

Cephus

Sr Member
When laser disc were a craze, I remember hearing about "disc rot," where they would simply go bad with time.

Anyone remember watching Empire Strikes Back, over and over, watching a TIE fighter get hit by an asteroid and seeing what looked like a pilot tumble out?

I hope CD, DVDs and Blu-ray don't have a shelf life.

I prefer owning a physical copy of anything, that way you can watch it anytime, never hafta worry about a buffer.
Everything has a shelf-life but DVDs and Blu-ray will last longer than I will so I don't care.
 

joberg

Legendary Member
"You'll own nothing but you'll be happy" seems to be the catch phrase of "The Great Reset"o_O:eek::devil:
The consumer has way more power than we think...it's just that the "work" involved will take time and effort to see any kind of result:rolleyes:
I only buy physical copies of films and books..."This is the way!"
 

JPH

Sr Member
"You'll own nothing but you'll be happy" seems to be the catch phrase of "The Great Reset"o_O:eek::devil:
The consumer has way more power than we think...it's just that the "work" involved will take time and effort to see any kind of result:rolleyes:
I only buy physical copies of films and books..."This is the way!"
Strangely enough, the folks who think we will be happy owning nothing, they want to own EVERYTHING.

Also, you can rewrite anything if it is digital and needs to be repurchas...er, relicensed
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
Top