Ten Years Later, Star Wars KOTOR II Gets An Official Update

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Sluis Van Shipyards

Master Member
I thought this mod has been around for a while? This is the first I've heard of any official attachment to it though. I wonder if this is a sign they might do a new version?
 

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The Mad Professor

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I thought this mod has been around for a while? This is the first I've heard of any official attachment to it though. I wonder if this is a sign they might do a new version?
No, the mod has been around for ages. This, however, is official, making it more of an actual expansion pack than a user-created mod. This means it also goes into the canon of the story.

Words cannot express how happy this makes me, so I will let someone else speak for me:

 
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Solo4114

Master Member
Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see anything about the additional content mod being "official." Or is that related to the "force speed effects" thing? Adding Workshop support is more like saying "We're making the game mod-friendly" rather than "Here's the official ending/additional chapters to the game." Shadowrun Returns has Workshop support, but that doesn't mean the user generated content = official canon.

I never played the game, but got it as part of a bundle I bought on Steam a while back.
 

Sluis Van Shipyards

Master Member
It said it was in partnership with Disney and Lucasfilm. So they gave it an endorsement in some form. That doesn't necessarily make it canon now though. I think Lucasfilm would be stupid not to make KOTOR canon though because it's better than the Prequels.
 

Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
I am still hopeful that the Story Group will canonize all the content from the distant past of the Star Wars verse. After the KOTOR era (games and comics) is three thousand years of almost no data. In that time, anything can be made into anything else, so no problem with that leading to where we were in TPM.

--Jonah
 

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Solo4114

Master Member
It said it was in partnership with Disney and Lucasfilm. So they gave it an endorsement in some form. That doesn't necessarily make it canon now though. I think Lucasfilm would be stupid not to make KOTOR canon though because it's better than the Prequels.
Ah, sorry. I misunderstood. I thought you were saying that the "additional content mod" was somehow becoming an "official" part of the game. I didn't realize you meant "canon" in the sense of "Story Group canon for the whole Star Wars franchise."
 

dascoyne

Master Member
So it's basically taking an existing free mod and tweaking/relabeling/endorsing it so we have the privilege of actually pay for it.

Right.
 

Solo4114

Master Member
So it's basically taking an existing free mod and tweaking/relabeling/endorsing it so we have the privilege of actually pay for it.

Right.
What I understood was rather that this patch modified the game so that you can use the Steam Workshop and more easily incorporate existing mods into your game if you choose to...and...uh...that's about it.
 

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Solo4114

Master Member
oh. .... that's mighty nice of them.
Yeah, and this is why my response was a bit more muted than overt joy. I mean, sure, it's nice. Steam Workshop is actually a pretty cool utility to incorporate mods, and the most up-to-date version of said mods, too. Particularly in a gaming industry that is increasingly anti-mod (and pro-forced-obsolescence), it's a welcome thing when a game you dig actively supports that.

But it's not as if this heralds a true overhaul of the game, nor did the company that holds the rights to it at this point "officially" fix the broken parts (so I gather). It's still relying on third-party/user-generated fixes to enable the broken stuff.

But yeah, it's nice and all. More like a nice little bonus than "OMG THEY FINALLY DID IT!!!!"

If it was on anything but Steam i'd go for it.
Eh, Steam gets a bad rap, I know, and if you're anti-DRM, I can understand your disdain of the platform. Certainly, a site like GOG is far more like what you may be looking for, if that's the case.

But they've also done some pretty cool, pro-consumer stuff. As I mentioned, they have the Workshop, which allows participating games to really push the modding scene in ways that I, at least, had thought mostly died out in modern gaming. In a world where Call of Duty games come out every 6 months and mods are basically impossible, it's nice to know there's still one corner of gaming where mods are easy to find.

It's also widely acknowledged that Steam's recent refund policy was almost singlehandedly responsible for WB/Rocksteady bothering to do sod all about the atrocious state of the PC release of Arkham Knight. Currently, they're estimating August for an interim patch. If not for Steam's refund policy, I'd bet you'd be looking at December at the earliest, because WB/Rocksteady just wouldn't have given a crap. It was only because Steam allowed refunds on digital downloads of games, and then went back to the developer and said "Pay up, jackasses." Basically, Steam did what consumers couldn't: it punched WB/Rocksteady right in the pocketbook, and it hit hard.

Steam was only able to do that because it has real leverage in the marketplace, and that's because it's a huge distributor for games. And it's not just AAA titles. I mean, yeah, they do some crappy stuff with "early access" that goes on for years on end with broken, unsupported games. But they also allow users to write honest reviews that slam titles like that, and warn people away. Steam also helps provide a real platform for wide distribution of indie games, allowing game development in general to continue without requiring companies to buddy up wit EA/Activision/Ubisoft/etc.

On balance, I'd say even if you don't like the platform itself, it's a good thing to have in the gaming industry.
 

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