sword question

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SterlingMedal

New Member
Is there a simple way to tell if a katana is full tang?

If not, could someone tell me how to determine wether or not a katana is full tang?
 

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MasterAnubis

New Member
With Katanas decrative nature it may be hard to tell. If the very end of the handle is not metal then its wouldn't be considered a full tang. If it is metal then the it might be. It would be hard to tell on some because it could be worked over and polished. In wich case it probably is. On most full tang knives and swords they have a slot in the end piece(pommel) that the tang goes into that completes the end of the handle. This way you don't need rivets to hold the handle on. If it has the rivets and no metal showing at the end then it will be 3/4 or 1/2 tang. I can't see a usable sword being less then 3/4 tang.

Hopefully this helps a little.

Shawn
 

SterlingMedal

New Member
With Katanas decrative nature it may be hard to tell. If the very end of the handle is not metal then its wouldn't be considered a full tang. If it is metal then the it might be. It would be hard to tell on some because it could be worked over and polished. In wich case it probably is. On most full tang knives and swords they have a slot in the end piece(pommel) that the tang goes into that completes the end of the handle. This way you don't need rivets to hold the handle on. If it has the rivets and no metal showing at the end then it will be 3/4 or 1/2 tang. I can't see a usable sword being less then 3/4 tang.

Hopefully this helps a little.

Shawn
Thanks. I'm gonna guess it's around 1/2 tang. The end of the handle is wood underneath the endcap.
 

MasterAnubis

New Member
I've been thinking, if you have a strong magnet you might be able to tell where it actually ends in the handle. Providing it isn't good stainless.

I'm curious now... are you doing something to it that it will matter?
 

PREDATORWARRIOR

New Member
The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it.

A full tang means that the grip conforms to the shape and follows the outline of the tang, which is a solid piece of metal (typically steel). It is a single piece of metal from tip to base but the hilt is usually encased. Scales (flat pieces of handle material, like stag, wood, or synthetics) may be affixed to the tang with rivets or pins. Alternately, the tang may be wrapped with braided cord or paracord. Injection-molded rubber (Kraton) or plastic (Zytel) are other grip options. A full tang generally implies a tough and durable sword or knife hilt, provided the steel has been properly heat treated and is not too hard (the harder it is, the more brittle it is). This method of production means that the sword or knife is stronger as it is a solid construction rather than a blade fixed to a base which can come off through wear or contact.

A hidden tang or rat-tail tang means that a long rod extends from the blade through a drilled or hollow grip, and is threaded so as to hold the grip in place by tightening a fastener at the end. Such fasteners are frequently built into the sword's or knife's pommel, which is then screwed on. This tang design results in a lighter but much weaker weapon. Swords that have these kinds of tangs are for decorative purpose only (with the exception of the three sport fencing weapons -- foil, epee, and sabre, which are designed for competitive use)

A stub tang means that the blade has only a short tab of metal at the end — often less than an inch in length — which fits into a slot in the grip and is held in place with epoxy, occasionally with a pin for reinforcement. Stub tangs are frequently found on low-quality knives and some wall decoration swords. Use of a stub tang greatly reduces the amount of metal required, as well as the skill of workmanship needed for manufacture. This results in lower prices for the consumer, but produces a non-functional weapon capable of breaking. Most knives with cast-metal grips utilize a stub tang. Any swords with a stub tang are to be decorations only, any use is extremely dangerous
 

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MasterAnubis

New Member
Way to Wiki it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_tang

I don't think that answers his original question and might just over complicate matters.

I counter your Wiki with:
http://housewares.about.com/od/glossary/g/tang.htm
A 'tang' is the protrusion of the steel into the handle of a knife or tool.
The knife tang can be either full tang, meaning that it extends into the full length of the handle, or partial tang, extending only part way into the handle as a socket or file end.
The tang extension into the handle not only provides a way of attaching the handle, but improves the weight and balance of the knife, and adds strength and durability.

Of course we can cut and paste all day long...
 

SterlingMedal

New Member
I've been thinking, if you have a strong magnet you might be able to tell where it actually ends in the handle. Providing it isn't good stainless.

I'm curious now... are you doing something to it that it will matter?
Thanks for the magnet idea.

I'm not doing anything with it that it will matter. I just wanted do some pratice swings with it and know that it won't fly apart or break.
 

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