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PhuketAussie

Active Member
This is a simple concept for a warp core prop for the 1960's Star Trek. The term 'warp core' was never used (to my knowledge) in the show, and although you see what is referred to as warp engines behind a triangular mesh screen in the engineering section there is no one particular prop the visualises the warp core like in all later versions of Star Trek. So, here's my 'proposal'!

I'm inspired by Science Bob's classroom, in which he has a circular bench with a vertical tube (I'm guessing filled with water) with bubbles rising up in it, and blue-lit. I'm currently a digital education teacher, and though I cannot fully renovate my classroom with fixtures, like Science Bob, I can install removable items, and since I am definitely a Star Trek fan (I do like Star Wars too lol) then a large warp core model was a definite choice. I decided to use roughly the skill level of my students as if doing a science fair project. So, here's the run-down of how it is made:

1. The base (lower): discarded plywood fibre-optic cable reel, covered in black card and gaff-tape, the piece on the front is made from three different bottle caps
2. The base (upper): a broken white water cooler bottle surrounded by four packaging bars retrieved from the packaging of a gas oven (they had connected the opposing styrene pieces together around the oven), and some EVA foam overlays
3. The tube: this is one of the diffuser layers out of a 55" LCD TV. Feature board or other plastic would work just as well
4. Light structure inside the tube: A smaller diameter cardboard tube, I think it was for a large roll of linoleum or similar. Bright white self-adhesive
LED tape, 9V / 10m long / not animated. 100 LED fairy light, blue, animated.
5. Top piece: rear panel off old LCD PC monitor, part of the monitor stand also used to connect the panel to the tube.

That's about it. The only screwing done was to connect the monitor stand to the monitor back panel, I used a simple hand drill to drill the holes. Everything else was either glued with white latex glue, hot glue gun, stapled, or taped.

I'm hoping this will encourage my students to step above the usual paper-plate and poster paper projects that they are used to doing.

 

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