Spoiler prop from Mando series finale. Do not read until you've seen it!


jamatar

New Member
This is a lot harder than I thought :) Looking forward to seeing a Starkiller run! I'm gonna work on the proportions more or maybe I should just leave it to the pros :)
 

Attachments

  • 01000722.jpg
    01000722.jpg
    2.2 MB · Views: 77
  • 01000720.jpg
    01000720.jpg
    9.1 MB · Views: 75

thd9791

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
This is a lot harder than I thought :) Looking forward to seeing a Starkiller run! I'm gonna work on the proportions more or maybe I should just leave it to the pros :)
I have absolutely zero experience with 3D printing and modeling, but for proportions...

A tried and true method for me is eye-balling. It's not precision accurate. However, I've seen lots of people (and done it myself) go through lots of calculations and end up with something that visually looks way off. I've done this on paper, thought my math was correct, but ended up with a part that was too big. Calculations are really important, but sometimes it's best to eye-ball it.

I use ratios.. compared to other parts that I know are accurate. If a bolt head is 1/4 the size of the lightsaber handle, and the handle is 20mm, the bolt head is probably around 5mm. Then I play around with 4, 5 or 6, to see if it looks better. Recently, trying to find the size of things on a Graflex based saber, I measured the details of the graflex with calipers, and compared those real numbers to the part I was trying to ID, seeing if it was bigger or smaller, and how much.

I've had very successful results, and have used it to eyeball when machining and working on items too. I mean, this isn't for work - I imagine machinists don't have this luxury
 

Halliwax

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I have absolutely zero experience with 3D printing and modeling, but for proportions...

A tried and true method for me is eye-balling. It's not precision accurate. However, I've seen lots of people (and done it myself) go through lots of calculations and end up with something that visually looks way off. I've done this on paper, thought my math was correct, but ended up with a part that was too big. Calculations are really important, but sometimes it's best to eye-ball it.

I use ratios.. compared to other parts that I know are accurate. If a bolt head is 1/4 the size of the lightsaber handle, and the handle is 20mm, the bolt head is probably around 5mm. Then I play around with 4, 5 or 6, to see if it looks better. Recently, trying to find the size of things on a Graflex based saber, I measured the details of the graflex with calipers, and compared those real numbers to the part I was trying to ID, seeing if it was bigger or smaller, and how much.

I've had very successful results, and have used it to eyeball when machining and working on items too. I mean, this isn't for work - I imagine machinists don't have this luxury
To be honest tom. Before I learned how to scale stuff in photoshop, well before I even had photoshop I use to blow the image up on my ipad and do exactly what you said. Found something in the photo I could get a measurement off of in real life. And once I got that then I had everything else

But now with photoshop it’s really quick and easy
 

jamatar

New Member
Thanks for the tips everyone :) Through a mixture of measuring what I have here with calipers and just general eyeballing, I think it's getting pretty gosh darn close. I'm going to do one more test print then it's up on thingiverse!
 

Attachments

  • mandosaber-sidebyside-01.jpg
    mandosaber-sidebyside-01.jpg
    66.2 KB · Views: 80
  • mandosaber-sidebyside-02.jpg
    mandosaber-sidebyside-02.jpg
    92.3 KB · Views: 77
  • mandosaber-sidebyside-03.jpg
    mandosaber-sidebyside-03.jpg
    73.6 KB · Views: 76
  • mandosaber-sidebyside-04.jpg
    mandosaber-sidebyside-04.jpg
    51.3 KB · Views: 77
  • mandosaber-sidebyside-05.jpg
    mandosaber-sidebyside-05.jpg
    37.1 KB · Views: 83

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
Top