Scale snow?

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Ronz

Well-Known Member
Hi guys. A friend of mine is a model aircraft builder and big into hyper realistic dioramas. At the moment he's trying to recreate and old WWII photograph of a plane on the ground. Trouble is it's got snow on the ground and he's having trouble figuring out how to replicate the snow accurately. The plane is 1:48 scale, he's tested crushed salt etc but nothing seems to have the right texture. I seem to remember seeing something a while back in some kind of spray form for this purpose but on searching for it I'm starting to think I imagined it... Any help would be greatly appreciated, if you guys don't know then noone does
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Smiling Demon

Sr Member
I have seen some cases that a guy used spray snow. The kind you get around Christmas time to spray on Christmas trees and such. As a matter of fact he also was dooing and old WWII prop plane!! Anyhoo, it looked really good. He sprayed it on in a misting fashion and took a stiff bristled brush and done a sweeping pattern effect on the "concrete" around the plane.

Hope this helps!!

Kenny
 

Jedi Dade

Master Member
Have you tried baking soda? Use a sifter to break it up. just sprinlle it around and as it "lays", it looks pretty good. If you actaully want it to stick you can use some of that "spray tack" stuff that artists use for matting paper. its a simple spray adhesive, that's fairly common at most craft stores.

tryi it out foirst on something you don't care about to see if you like the results...

Jedi Dade
 

Ronz

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a decent idea. He tells me he's trying out some tests with crushed white pastel chalk and spray fixative, I'll tell him about the baking soda too. Thanks Jedi Dade
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rayra

Well-Known Member
baking SODA. Has a good grain to it. Flour is good for dusting, as well.
Helluva lot cheaper than pastels.
 

Jedi Dade

Master Member
I found that flour tends to "yellow" over time.Baking powder (or soda) stays white over time.you need to sift the baking soda/powder to take the large granuals out.

Jedi Dade
 

Ronz

Well-Known Member
Yeah he told me that flour yellowed on some of his older dioramas, looks more like there were a lot of cats in WWII Germany than we suspected if you get my meaning
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Ronz (DO NOT EAT THE YELLOW SNOW)
 
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