Royal Guard Helmet - 3D printed - Finished.

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TazMan2000

Master Member
Any Royal Guard fans out there? Lots of black and white SW helmets in my collection, so I decided to print off something that would give it some colour.
Currently printing out the bottom part. I had a print failure with the crown, so instead of doing the entire crown over again, I started from where I thought it failed, hence the styrene filler.

20191117_150013.jpg



TazMan2000
 

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Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
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Good start. :) I have one DP, one Rubies Supreme, and one fanmade, so far. I will probably pick up an ANOVOS if it ever materializes, and I have plans to scratch-build a stupidly over-engineered version at some point. Been in love with these guys since 1982 and the first promo materials. First SW costume I tackled as an adult. The refinement is ongoing.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Inquisitor Peregrinus , I wonder how the actors wearing the helmets got fresh air in those helmets? Functionally (or fictionally) the Stormtrooper helmets had vents on the sides and back. No vents on the guard helmet.

TazMan2000
 

Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
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They didn't. You can keep it on long enough to do a take without sweltering, but after about ten minutes, you start using up your Oxygen and the flushed feeling of too much carbon dioxide starts to set in. Part of my stupidly over-engineered approach is addressing that. I've looked at everything from snorkels to rebreathers to scrubbers to internal air cartridges. All have their pros and cons. Same thing applies as with all other helmets: If you can keep fresh air moving past your nose and mouth, you'll be just fine.

ETA: Oh, yeah. You mentioned Stormtroopers. Functionally, pre-Rogue One Stormtroopers have vents right at the mouth -- the frown being backed with panty-hose, bastically. Fictionally, those are outflow vents. Inflow is through the two filters flanking the annunciator on the chin. If external air becomes too tenuous or toxic, solenoids behind the filters switch over to internal air supply, stowed in the side tubes.
 
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TazMan2000

Master Member
There is not much room in the helmet to put in fans, so if one is to wear something like this, some sort of system has to be worn under the cloak to force air into the helmet, probably through the front and exit out the back. If the intake system is worn on the belt, it would be best to include a charcoal filter... :lol:

TazMan2000
 

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Inquisitor Peregrinus

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I'm fiddling with axial fans to close off the faces and add lateral ducting so they can lay flat in those raised bands that join at the bottom of the avontail. They sit up at cheek level, with the outflow directed toward the face. A couple of flattened oval tubes lead from the fans down to an inflow plenum at the lower-front join.Between the plushness of the robe and the little bit of gap between helmet and robe, there'll be enough space for air to get pulled in. There's enough room for a couple AAA batteries below where the fans would sit before those bands get too narrow for them and the tubing.

That's one setup I've worked up.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
I guess the fans would also be able to keep the lens clear. My helmet must be small (or my head must be large) because my cheeks rub up against the helmet when I put it on. Very little room for fans, axial or otherwise. Not a biggie, since this helmet will only be worn on a helmet stand.

TazMan2000
 

Inquisitor Peregrinus

Master Member
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Depends on the wall thickness. The original sculptor sculpted the helmet as close to a cast of his head as he could. But, he acknowledged, he has a big head. Takeaway? Pretty much every RG lid I've ever run across takes a layer off your cheeks. Why I'm designing stuff that fits in those bumped-out portions.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Still a quarter piece on the bottom part missing on the hidden side. It may not be totally accurate to the filming helmet in appearance, but for 5 bucks on CGTrader you can't go wrong.

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Still lots of sanding to do, but since the helmet is simple in nature, it will be easier than other helmets.

TazMan2000
 

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Inquisitor Peregrinus

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Failure? Far from it. Just part of the process. Fill. Sand. Fill. Sand. Once you get it far enough along you need to see where the remaining defects are, prime. Something like this? I usually have at least two or three priming stages until I have it smooth enough.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
Oof. Winter painting blues?

No, I just want to ensure I get a nice smooth and glossy coat. Spray paint should be applied at over 15 degrees Celcius or about 60 Fahrenheit for best results. At my work I have a warehouse heated by radiant Natural Gas. I tried spray painting there once and it was so dry the paint congealed in the air and landed on my helmet like silly string. Too hot and too dry, but I can't change the temperature. I have a paint booth in my work shop, but its too small for this helmet.

TazMan2000
 

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Inquisitor Peregrinus

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I know the feeling. When I was working on my fanmade, there were numerous shallows and defects in the resin that would affect light kicks from the finished glosscoat, so after the glazing putty came a bunch of priming in alternating colors. Along the way, I used a coat of my gloss Regal Red just to get a sense of how it was doing -- then sanded that down, too. *lol*

DSC02417.JPG


Outside of the lower face, where it's still red is areas I need to lay more glazing putty in those area.
 

TazMan2000

Master Member
I know the feeling. When I was working on my fanmade, there were numerous shallows and defects in the resin that would affect light kicks from the finished glosscoat, so after the glazing putty came a bunch of priming in alternating colors. Along the way, I used a coat of my gloss Regal Red just to get a sense of how it was doing -- then sanded that down, too. *lol*

View attachment 1273392

Outside of the lower face, where it's still red is areas I need to lay more glazing putty in those area.

When I first saw your post, the picture stood out first, of course.
I thought, well that's a "different" paintjob...before I read it was different levels of glazing putty. Lol

TazMan2000
 

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