Revell AT-AT upgrades WIP

I forgot to post before, a few days ago I added some cast texture to the side armor plates on the body. I think one of the guys doing a studio scale AT-AT mentioned doing it and pointed out the texture on the studio model, which I had assumed was just an aging failing paint job in the pics on Modeler Magic. But I like the look of it, so I used some Mr. Surfacer 500 stippled on the sides using one of those stiff disposable brushes. I was nervous to start but it came out pretty nice I think.

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Everything is looking great. Pedro. :D I agree. The painting stage is the most difficult part of modeling, especially if it requires weathering or texturing. How are you casting your parts Pedro? You mentioned a heat and mold plastic, but what are you using to cast them with?
 
For the neck, you could've used "Stretch Magic", it's a bead and jewelry cord that comes in a few measurements (mine was 25 meter by 1mm, or .039 in).
I used it for the end of spokes on my 2001 Space Station. As the name, it stretches and bend, so if you have to follow the neck, it's a great way to achieve that look.
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Hey Haystack Hair,

Which snowspeeder are you using in your diorama? Was it from a separate kit?

It's the Revell Pocket snowspeeder, technically it's something like 1/56 or 1/68 but to my eyes it's close enough to 1/72 scale for me to be happy with. Same with the Pocket TIE fighters, they're a little bigger than the 1/72 Finemolds offerings but so close that I wouldn't be fussed personally
 
Everything is looking great. Pedro. :D I agree. The painting stage is the most difficult part of modeling, especially if it requires weathering or texturing. How are you casting your parts Pedro? You mentioned a heat and mold plastic, but what are you using to cast them with?

The molds are made with Instant Mold by Cool Minis, the same stuff as InstaMold I think. You it's slightly rubbery until you drop it in hot water, then it becomes malleable and you press it over your parts. I'm casting in regular polyurethane resin. No release needed, the mold works just like silicone but you can reheat and reuse it. I love the stuff!

The speeder is the small Revell kit.
 
It's the Revell Pocket snowspeeder, technically it's something like 1/56 or 1/68 but to my eyes it's close enough to 1/72 scale for me to be happy with. Same with the Pocket TIE fighters, they're a little bigger than the 1/72 Finemolds offerings but so close that I wouldn't be fussed personally


The molds are made with Instant Mold by Cool Minis, the same stuff as InstaMold I think. You it's slightly rubbery until you drop it in hot water, then it becomes malleable and you press it over your parts. I'm casting in regular polyurethane resin. No release needed, the mold works just like silicone but you can reheat and reuse it. I love the stuff!

The speeder is the small Revell kit.


Cool! Thanks guys.
 
Ahh the AT-AT...good times.
I have often thought about doing another one, but have too many other projects on the bench.
The slinking worked really well and gave some limited mobility to the heads, not a lot but just a little.
One other thing if I may suggest, don't glue the heads on, the first thing that breaks is the guns so I made a jig to mount the heads during transport. Came in real handy when I moved.
Your build is really nice, a lot of ideas that if I did another I would definitely incorporate.
Can't wait to see them painted.
 
This is awesome! I have used the cockpit of the Revell Tydirium inlcuding two Stormtrooper figures. It fits like a glove inside the AT-AT head. And yes, the Pocket Snowspeeder is the same scale.
 
I've been working on a walking version of this kit - there is a thread somewhere, but seeing the progress on these builds makes me think it may be better to have a go at stop motion!
 
The molds are made with Instant Mold by Cool Minis, the same stuff as InstaMold I think. You it's slightly rubbery until you drop it in hot water, then it becomes malleable and you press it over your parts. I'm casting in regular polyurethane resin. No release needed, the mold works just like silicone but you can reheat and reuse it. I love the stuff!

The speeder is the small Revell kit.

That stuff is great. I use it alot to make quick copies of things using the two part grey stuff as well.

You've done some great work on that AT-AT. RIght up there with Jun Austira, Christrom and Dankin72

Also for those interested, here is a size comparison between the Revell speeder. From left to right is the large AMT speeder, then the Fine Molds 1/48 speeder, then the Revell Easy Pocket Kit speeder, then a 1/70 ish Di Agostini die cast speeder


And this is the 1/70ish di agostini speeder with the RetroSF 1/72 speeder



Here is the di agonstini (on the right) with Revell pocket kit (on the left) and some micromachine firgures (which come out to about 1/74. Although the Revell speeder feels a bit too big for the figures)




I think, the Revell Pocket one is closer to the proportionate size of the foot crushing the speeder scene, but the 1/70 and 1/72 one is closer to something that could duplicate the flying through the leg scene. Since they didn't adhere to one set scale throughout the various shots I think the Revell Pocket, the Di Agostini die cast and the RetroSF one all look good in my opinion when paired with the Revell AT-AT and a case can be made for each being the correct scale depending on the scene

 
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Time for an update! I had a lot of time to work on this baby over the holidays, despite a sick toddler and family visits. Good thing I'm a night person! ;)

I realized I never posted any pictures of the belly/engine parts. So, here goes. I'm missing the little dome/cover on the harrier vents, which I built and subsequently lost. I'll replace them if I can but don't want to loose any steam.

This little greeble at the front of the engine block was actually easier to build than I had thought. A bunch of thin slices for the spokes and I sanded the assembled bit to get the outward bevel.

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More pics. The harrier vents are epoxy putty with textured styrene for the actual vent surface. There's a fair amount of scribing and greebling on these engine parts.
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You don't really see this after it goes on, but I built it anyway.
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This little bit goes at the back, maybe this pic will serve as a reference to others doing this kit, I had a bit of a hard time figuring out the shape of this piece.
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My next posts will be of the painting work. It's actually about 80% done being weathered, but I don't have time to post any pictures right now. I may actually finish this beast! (didn't quite make 2014 though)
 
Excellent work Pedro. Definitely coming along. :thumbsup :thumbsup :thumbsup

Your pics are helpful, especially in my case. I'm eventually going to tackle 'the thing at the back' so your piece will come in handy as reference. :)
 
I don't know about you . . . but I'm already tired looking at all those beautiful shots not to mention all the work that went into the belly of that beast . . . a sick toddler would have taken all my precious time instead ... looking forward to your progress . . . I wish a kit-bash set would be available in the near future ... anamorphicWayne and yourself make this seem so easy ... whilest it is very time consuming indeed :wacko

Chaim
 
Thanks Sym-Cha and Wayne! Keep in mind that a lot of what you're seeing here is a year of work, just finally coming together. :)

So, on to painting, which I started about a week ago. I started with a good coat of Tamiya primer from the spray can (love this primer!). This is a pretty blue-ish grey, but I let a little stick around for color variation. I mixed a custom grey color with black, white, Sky Grey, and a few drops of a dark blue (all Tamiya). Made up a light and dark version of this, then sprayed all the panels on the model with the dark version, spraying from the panel center to leave a little bit of the primer showing at panel edges. After this I hit a few panels with a much darkened grey, either masked or hand shaded. Then I masked a few sections with some liquid mask applied with a sponge for chipped paint. Here are pics of this process:
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After this I sprayed the lighter custom grey over most of the model, lightening the darkened parts and leaving some minor color variations throughout. I should add here that I love my new Iwata gravity feed, thanks Santa (me)! After everything was dry I removed the liquid mask, which I hate doing and wish there was a better way.

After that I went after it with the oil paints, primarily mixes of blue, black, brown, and occasionally white for lightening. I got the basic technique from amazing modeler FichtenFoo (Michael Ficthenmayer). The basic process is that I wet an area slightly with thinner, then use various brushes to apply small amounts of oil paint to tint panels and create streaks. I love this weathering method, you just keep pushing the color around until you have the look you want. You can concentrate on a whole panel to tint it, create shading effects, leave the paint kind of concentrated for drips, etc. Lots of variation for not a lot of work and I find it very relaxing. :)

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Post getting long so I'll start another. :)

After all the oil paint was dry (overnight) I went over some areas again, waited another day. I wasn't happy with how the big chipping on the side panel came out so I sanded off and re-painted that section. Another night to dry, and I used powdered pastel chalks (black and white mostly) to enhance some of the streaks and burn marks, and add some more color variation. For some reason it's easier to lighten a panel with pastel than oil paint, so the white was useful here. The pastels are much less forgiving than oil, you have to take care where you apply high contrast powder! So, here are the parts as they stand today. It's looking close to done to me, though I'll go in and add some more chipped paint with sponge painting soon. Not sure how far I'll go, it's difficult to tell when something is done in the weathering stages! I may add some blast marks if I feel they're needed.

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The lower legs and feet are mostly done too, I just didn't take any pics yet. Time to start thinking about a base and some snow options! I've never done any work with miniature snow, so I'm very open to suggestions about what products to use. :)
 
The weathering is tremendous - has the real look of studio scale! As for snow, do not use bicarbonate of soda, it will yellow over time and possibly react with your paint work. Scenic snow would be quite good for this scale, but my favourite is interior house filler (the type you use to repair walls). You can water it down and slosh it on. Also, you can paint it on the AT-AT too and it really helps unify it with the scene. Have a look at my diorama if you want - that was done using the filler.
 
Dude, your diorama is amazing, really. Sad that the in-progress pics are all gone! Did you use the filler for the base snow as well? Looks pretty powdery to me (a good thing). I did see some stuff from a european company the other day, who's name escapes me, which had a really cool scale look including just a bit of sparkle. Pricey though! I always wondered how any of the snow managed to stay intact on the walkers, I'd think those would get pretty hot!
 
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