Ressikan Flute

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modelnut

New Member
The original flute and box went up for sale a while back, and the dimensions given for the box were 12½x3½x3½in. Note that auction dimensions like these vary in their accuracy from listing to listing, so take them with a grain of salt as it's entirely possible they are rounded off by +- 1/8 or 1/4 inch or so. But they give a good general idea.

If the 12.5" box length in the auction is accurate, that means the original flute was about 10.125" (~257 mm) based on screen caps.

I'd say your box seems more or less proportionally appropriate for the length of your penny whistle - both flute and box will be larger overall but they'll look in scale to each other!

Thank you, E!

I was lying in bed last night imagining how I could lengthen my box. I figured out a way. But it would have added another day to my build.

As for the packing foam, all I can find in my area is white. Walmart has the foam that can be used to stuff seat cushions but only in white. Luckily Google just gave me this video on how to make it a different color: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hihfQgoeHPg I am thinking a light to medium grey from all of the reference photos.

So today I am re-attaching the hinges, making a magnetic latch, squaring up the box bottom and lid, and making the leaf pattern on the box surface. Work will continue on the flute of course. I am hoping to have this finished by the weekend.

And I found this for the pennywhistle: The Inner Light - STAR TREK - Tin Whistle Tabs Play Along Tutorial

- Leelan
 

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E Williams

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The foam on the original was sprayed Krylon Dull Aluminum according to the original builder so a light grey or silver should work well :)
 

mrwax

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The foam on the original was sprayed Krylon Dull Aluminum according to the original builder so a light grey or silver should work well :)
You are just a fount of good information on this thing, I appreciate you chiming in.
 

modelnut

New Member
Looking for images of the detail on the box I came across this: Star Trek: The Next Generation, Picard Ressikan Flute replica movie prop

Star-Trek-The-Next-Generation-Picard-Ressikan-Flute-1.jpg

And this one on Etsy: Star Trek TNG "Inner Light" Ressikan Flute Playable Prop Replica


Etsy 003.jpg


Of the two, the first is obviously more accurate.

I think I will try for this one:

Prop 001 bigger.jpg


It looks to be a pale Verdigris in color.

Prop 004 cropped.jpg



Enough dilly-dallying. Back to work!

- Leelan
 

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modelnut

New Member
Making progress.

I made the top and bottom of the case more equal in size and squared it up. I am using notebook paper hole reinforcers as masks around the holes in the flute.

001.jpg


I squared the box and added lead weights so that there would be a definite bottom to it. There are magnets in four corners to hold the case shut on contact.

003.jpg


And I have the first layer of detail on the outside of the case. I am thinking that three layers should do it.

004.jpg


I hope to start painting the case tomorrow afternoon.

- Leelan
 

modelnut

New Member
I found a stiff and sturdy poster board at the Dollar Tree a few days ago. I figure between the CA glue, Modge Podge, and a couple of layers of paint and sealer that it will be pretty wooden and durable by the end.

It would help if there were better pictures of the detail on the case. As it is I am having to squint and swag. (Swag - Scientific Wild Ass Guess.)

- Leelan
 

Dr Jones Sr

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I'm a whistle player (traditional Irish whistle) and the photos posted above show three entirely different styles of whistle, regarding the construction of the head.

The screen shots and some of the other photos clearly show the method of construction devised by Bernard Overton (RIP) in the 1970s.

He started out with alloy (aluminium) tubing, then re-shaped/forged the cylinder into a square at the top, into which he put a rectangular block. This style of whistle is still being made by Phil Hardy and Colin Goldie, both of whom were authorised by Bernard Overton many years ago to produce Overton-style whistles.

The Overton-style head has quite distinctive machined 'cuts' on the top and sides which can be plainly seen on some of the screen-shots.

Here are two views of Overton-style heads, by Colin Goldie.

COkufCK.jpg


Below left to right is an Overton-style whistle made by Colin Goldie, two traditional rolled-sheet-tin Clarkes, and a newer-model Clarke with the moulded plastic top.

On the Overton-style whistle (far left) you can see the unmistakable head design with the distinctive cuts on the top and on both sides. This AFAIK is the only method of whistle-making that gives this appearance.

omGSBjb.jpg


You can see with absolute clarity that the Picard whistle is made in the Overton style, and not either of the Clarke styles.

iJI0WOT.jpg


Here's a video by Colin Goldie showing how these whistles are made.

Now, all the people who have made the Overton-style whistles (Overton, Hardy, and Goldie) make cylindrical bodies, but as we can see the Picard whistle has a conical body. We can see in the screen shot above that the Overton-style head is made of aluminium which has been painted gold, and is a separate piece from the body, the head and body joined with a silver tube.

It's possible that Phil Hardy or Colin Goldie was contracted to make just the head, or the entire thing.

It's also possible that somebody saw a Goldie, Hardy, or Overton had had the prop department create a similar-looking thing.
 
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modelnut

New Member
I just did a search on Amazon for "tin whistle Overton style" and "penny whistle Overton style" and came up with nothing. A Google search did not pull up anything either. A search for "Overton-style whistles" did get a few hits. But a whistle that is between $150 and $400 is out of my price range. :confused:
 

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modelnut

New Member
One step forward, two steps back.

I started making paper dolls for the fallen leaf pattern on the case. I think I have five different shapes so far. Multiples of each. I will start gluing them on tomorrow or Tuesday. (First day back at work tomorrow after a week off. :mad:)

005.jpg


The painting didn't go so well on the flute. So I had to strip it and primer it again. My own fault. I rushed it and used rattle can spray paint even though I have better paint available. It's just that the better paint takes longer. I did a rush job and screwed it up. So I have to start over.

The first layer of detail on the box looks good though.

- Leelan
 

Dr Jones Sr

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Yes the method of crafting is complicated and time-consuming, and these whistles are expensive, used by many professional players.

Bernard Overton passed away years ago. Overton whistles show up on the used market occasionally. They were made by himself, and under license by Colin Goldie and Phil Hardy. When Bernard passed Colin Goldie began stamping his own name on his whistles, and Phil Hardy founded his firm Kerry Whistles.

Colin Goldie is continuing to make these whistles in the original handmade Overton way, you can Google "colin goldie whistles" to see his site.

Phil Hardy has gone the factor-produced route, and changed his designs. You can Google "kerry whistles" to see his site.

Thing is, the Bernard Overton/Colin Goldie method of forging the round tube into a square at one end is the only way to create a whistle that looks like Picard's whistle. Of course Picard's whistle might well be a non-playing prop made in imitation of of the Overton/Goldie style.
 

modelnut

New Member
More details from that video.

Prop 011.jpg



Prop 012.jpg


Have any of you tried to replicate the case? Could you post pictures? Maybe give me a couple of tips?

- Leelan
 

HMS Mike

Sr Member
The flute was a complete custom non playing Prop. Made of brass rod and alum. turned on a lath. The box was plexiglass sheet construction with plastic hinges. The details were 3 layers of styrene sheet hand cut to those shapes and glue on top of each other. The foam was black case foam with sliver spray on it.
 

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Dr Jones Sr

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I've been looking over the photos posted above, I don't know where the different photos are from or what their provenance is, but from looking at a couple screen-shots it seems to me that the whistle he's holding seems closest (perhaps identical) to this one.

You can see that there's no metal rings around the fingerholes, rather it's clear that the body of the whistle is tin (or perhaps polished aluminium) painted gold, and that the gold paint doesn't quite come up to the edges of the holes, leaving some of the tin underneath showing. It's obviously paint over metal, and not added silver metal rings. I do see that the edges of the fingerholes have a tiny crimp or flare of metal, indicating to me that the fingerholes were punched from behind when the tin was still in sheet form, before it was rolled. I'm pretty sure that's how the old sheet-tin Clarke whistles were made, probably a stamp having all 6 holes used to punch the holes from a piece of sheet tin, then the sheet is rolled over a mandrel, then the seam at the back soldered.

ELpCcvM.jpg


hoddSdP.jpg


You can see the bottom fingerhole here, the whistle tube is flat, just with the colours gold and silver making the contrast around the holes.

OxRluSc.jpg


The other thing that makes me think that the whistle in these screen shots is the same as in the case, in the photos above, is that you can see file-marks on the side of the head, which have filed off some gold paint allowing the aluminium below to show.

iJI0WOT.jpg


I think that a playing replica would be easy to make, using a Colin Goldie High D whistle head and a Shaw whistle body of the same OD, married together with a polished aluminium tube. Paint it gold and Bob's your Uncle.
 
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modelnut

New Member
I think that a playing replica would be easy to make, using a Colin Goldie High D whistle head and a Shaw whistle body of the same OD, married together with a polished aluminium tube. Paint it gold and Bob's your Uncle.
Thank you, Dr. Jones!

I think the pictures you chose offer the simplest solution. The details on the case look very clear and easy to replicate.
But I will have to go with a Clarke tin whistle. I can't afford +$300 for a Goldie. :(

- Leelan
 
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HMS Mike

Sr Member
Well you make it the way you want, But I told you what it was made from. I was there when it was made. I also worked on it my self. But do as you will.
 

Zombie Killer

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Got to love it when the guy who helped make and handled the real one is told he is wrong about what it was made from and how it was made....lol
 

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