primer for resin

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bighedz

New Member
I picked up some Rust-Oleum 2x Ultra Cover primer from Home Depot. The can says bonds to plastic. Sprayed my resin model and found that the primer feels sticky to the touch (doesn't leave a fingerprint though) and in some crevices is still rather wet about 12 hours later. Is this normal for spraying resin? I did a couple of light passes, so don't think I oversprayed it.

Is there a preferred brand or type of primer for resin kits? The can does say it can take up to 24 hours to completely dry, but I wouldn't expect it to be still tacky in places this long.

thanks
 

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Beaker

Well-Known Member
Make sure that the resin parts do not have release on them... if there is, no primer will stick.
We really like a primer made by Lowes called Valspar Plastic Primer (it is clear)... make sure it states plastic primer and not their regular primer.... works really well!
 

Darth Lars

Master Member
Did you clean the kit before-hand? Often there can be "mould release" (often silicone oil) still on the parts. You should always use dishwashing soap and water to clean a kit before you do anything else.

Also, paint does not cure well if you paint in a cold environment. If you don't have any warm well-ventilated area and have to paint in the cold season, then there are a few tricks. Some that I have used are, depending on the weather: pre-heating the paint can in a jug of warm water, using a heat gun, painting inside a large cardboard box with tea candles, moving it inside after an hour when most of the fumes have evaporated.

A more unusual reason is if the resin hasn't cured properly and is weeping chemicals. It is often because the resin hasn't been mixed properly before it was poured or too little hardener was used.
If this happens, the resin part is sometimes puffed up. You could make it cure better by opening it up (drill holes or cut) and scoop out uncured resin from the inside, followed by a lot of waiting until it has cured. You could speed up the curing with heat, but then you would also risk warping.
But if the resin is weeping and you have paid good money for it, then you should take it up with the seller.
 
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