PKD - Stealth Edition (completed)

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tennantlim

Well-Known Member
I've been commissioned to build a PKD in the same Stealth style. The process is pretty much the same, aside from some painting techniques that I will elaborate on later, so there won't be as many detailed posts of the process.

Here's the kit after a test fit.
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With the lessons learned from my previous build, I was able to fabricate the main spring assembly with higher fidelity.
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This time I rubbed graphite powder on the stainless steel components instead of Alclad, and I used matte black as the base coat for the upper receiver and trigger guard instead of gloss black for a dry gun kote finish. Here it is at about 70% completion. I wasn't happy with the finishing on several parts so I've had to strip their paints and redo. I'm also waiting on a few replacement parts and the light kit.
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To be continued...
 

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masterjedi322

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Insanely awesome build!

A few questions, if you don’t mind:
  • How does the printed resin handle tapping for the hardware?
  • How does the paint handle repeated movements? Curious if the bolt or cylinder are showing any signs of wear?

Sean
 

tennantlim

Well-Known Member
Insanely awesome build!

A few questions, if you don’t mind:
  • How does the printed resin handle tapping for the hardware?
  • How does the paint handle repeated movements? Curious if the bolt or cylinder are showing any signs of wear?

Sean

Thank you Sean!

With a hand drill, you could simply tap the screws directly into the holes. Just do it slow to avoid over tapping.

The cylinder pin suffers the most abuse, so it's a good thing it's not visible most of the time. In fact I'm already planning to replace it with a metal pin in my next build. I haven't disengaged the bolt much, but the paint has remained intact thus far.
 

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