Newbie Project. Oscillation Overthruster

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by docatomic, May 15, 2012.

  1. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    I'm new to building replica props and decided to take on an oscillation overthruster. The intent is to mill the final version out of aluminum. In the mean time, I have been experimenting with design and fabrication techniques using wood. The goal is to make a replica that can be customized with switches, lights and anything else an owner may prefer in order to replicate the particular model they prefer (e.g., the BB theatrical version, Star Trek versions, etc.). So far, this is what I have come up with...

    View attachment 94645

    Any suggestions for parts that could be used for the details and/or suggested modifications would be appreciated.
     
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  2. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Here's a bit more on the project...

    A few months ago I decided to take on a small project (so I thought at the time), a scratch build of an oscillation overthruster replica using aluminum as the primary material. In planning out the project I had several objectives. The primary objective was to be as true to the theatrical version as possible. However, the were several other factors that could (and would) cause a deviation from this primary objective. First of all, I wanted to build a version that could be outfitted with switches, lights and possibly some other electrical components. To me, this meant that it had to have cavities large enough to accommodate these components and any associated power source and wires. Second, since the final build would be out aluminum, I desired a modular approach that could be assembled using fasteners instead of a nearly monolithic approach that would require 'hogging' out a chunk of aluminum. I figured that by using a modular approach the model could be retrofitted with modified components at a lated date as I saw fit. The other advantage, at least for me, was that if I ruined a piece of the project I would only have to re-fabricate the ruined piece. With all this in mind, I set out to build a prototype out of wood so I could experiment with different design concepts and fabrication techniques. One of my first steps was to set the physical scale of the replica by identifying some commercially available electronic components that I could use. In particular, I tried to find the smallest switches I could that resembled what I believe to be switches on the theatrical version. This included the switches on the three 'switch plates' and the switch (or light?) on the 'orb.' What I came up with is shown in the photo below. I plan to use the switch on the far left for the switch plates and one of the other two on the orb.

    View attachment 95088

    After several false starts using balsa and bass wood I came up with a design that I decided to make out of walnut. This was truly a scratch build with the raw materials shown below.

    View attachment 95089

    The design called for the components shown in the next image.

    View attachment 95090

    After assembly, the result is a replica that had the desired 'cavities'

    View attachment 95091

    and was of an appropriate scale.

    View attachment 95092

    Next step... the details and then an aluminum version. If anyone is interested I could share more details in subsequent posts in this thread.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2012
  3. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Please do.. Great build.
     
  4. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The build-up…

    First, I'll start out with what I call the 'thumb sub-assembly.' It consists of the thumb piece and the thumb plate. At the bottom of the thumb piece, two holes are drilled and tapped for 6-32 machine screws to attach the thumb plate. (Unless otherwise noted, all fasteners are 6-32.) A single hole is drilled through and tapped on the rear side of the thumb piece to attach the rear part of the top and bottom cover plate assemblies. A notch on the front of the thumb piece supports the ‘rear switch plate.’ The thumb plate has two other holes that will be used to fasten the thumb plate to the ‘orb sub-assembly’ and to the ‘knuckle.’ The thumb sub-assembly is shown below. The second hole on the side of the thumb piece was an experiment that was abandoned.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    At the front of the device are the ‘nose piece sub-assembly’, ‘face plate’ and ‘knuckle.’ The nose piece sub-assembly consists of the ‘nose piece’ and the ‘front switch plate.’ The tenon on the nose piece is drilled and tapped to secure the front switch plate. The faceplate ‘floats’ between the notches on the nose piece and knuckle. The nose piece and knuckle are also drilled and tapped to attach the top and bottom cover plates.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The ‘bridge sub-assembly’ consists of the bridge piece and the rear switch plate. The front ‘tongue’ on the bridge piece supports the front switch plate and is drilled and tapped to attach the top and bottom cover plates.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The sub-assemblies described above form the majority of the bezel.

    [​IMG]

    Now onto the ‘orb sub-assembly.’ The orb was made from two solid wood hemispheres. The ‘orb riser’ is attached to the front of the orb and supports the ‘top switch plate.’

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The notch in the orb riser accepts the knuckle with a machine screw that passes through the thumb plate and the orb riser.

    [​IMG]

    The full bezel assembly is shown below.

    [​IMG]

    The top cover plate has two parts, a cover plate and a piece that I have yet to name. In the aluminum version the front of this unnamed piece will be grooved to produce the ‘comb/heat-sink’ effect seen in the theatrical version. In this sub-assembly I used a 4-40 machine screw.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The bottom cover plate has three parts, a cover plate and two other pieces that I have yet to name. As with the top cover plate, 4-40 machine screws were used to attach the unnamed pieces. The rounded piece will be grooved in the aluminum version.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The next two photos show the fully assembled prototype.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I’ll be modifying the switch plates soon to accept the switches and ‘light-posts.’
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 9, 2018
  5. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This is beautiful looking. Its a shame that the wood isn't the final product.
     
  6. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Thanks. A metal version is on the way. I am enjoying the build. I'll keep posting the progress.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2012
  7. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    What are you using to get such precise cut on such small wood pieces? Clean work!

    Nick
     
  8. Mr Webber

    Mr Webber Sr Member

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    Thats fantastic, great project.

    When i first saw it i thought it was a steampunk overthruster build, would be as cool, have you thought about playing around with that when all the works done?
     
  9. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The majority of the precision cuts were made with a Proxxon FKS/E precision table saw. I've had it for many years and have used it on several projects.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    So, I have a bit of experience using it. But, I must admit, I have a rather large pile of overthruster parts that failed to satisfy 'form and fit' criteria. The riverboat is not complete yet. I took a break from building to work on the overthruster project.

    I did a little search on steampunk overthrusters. I may consider it. I've got to finish the riverboat at some point.
     
  10. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Any news on this gorgeous build?
     
  11. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The 'light-posts' were made using .22 LR casings, 5mm flat-top white LEDs and #12 brass washers. There were two options for the brass washers, finishing (on the left of the figure) and flat (on the right).

    View attachment 101867

    Looking at screen captures it seems (to me anyway) that the flat washers are more consistent with the theatrical version so, I proceeded down that line.

    View attachment 101868

    The washers were positioned at an 'appropriate' position on the casing and brazed in place using Vulcan 65-PSS silver solder paste. A small collar at the base of the LEDs was carefully filed down so that there was a snug fit inside the casing. The LEDs were held into place using a small drop of silicon. This also serves to insulate the leads from the casing.

    View attachment 101869

    Next step, the switch plate assemblies.
     
  12. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The switch plate assemblies contain the switch plates, 'light-posts' and mini-switches. The mounting points for the 'light-posts' were countersunk using a 1/2" end mill (a 1/2" Forstner Bit works well on wood). This allows the base of the 'light-post' to be inlayed into the switch plate. The particular mini-switches I found required a 6.2 mm hole and an M7x0.75 tap. Note that the button on the switch has a flat top. I have been experimenting with a product called 'Plasti Dip' that shows promise for giving the button a more rounded look consistent with the theatrical version. The smaller hole on the switch plate is for attaching it to the overthruster with a machine screw.

    [​IMG]

    The picture below shows the upper and lower switch plates attached to the overthruster.

    [​IMG]

    Next, I'll be modifying the 'orb assembly' to accept its electrical components.
     
  13. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Exemplary work!

    Nick
     
  14. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Awesome!
     
  15. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    It's been a long time since my last post but, I haven't given up on the aluminum version of the overthruster replica. Based on the wooden prototype I discovered that I could scale down the size about 10-15%. The overall dimensions for the aluminum build are ~3.25" x 2.5" x 2.0". The scaling down also required some design changes. I'll get into more detail on the new design in future posts but, first, I'll show the progress to date.

    oo_top.jpg oo_bottom.jpg
     
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  16. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Beautiful work!!
     
  17. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The build begins with the 'orb.' Its size, along with the thickness of the 'bezel' will set the scale of the overthruster. Based on what I learned from the prototype, I chose a 2" diameter solid aluminum sphere as the foundation of the orb and a 3/4" bezel thickness.

    beginning.jpg

    Since I will be machining the parts, I had to be a little more diligent in developing some schematics. The schematic for the orb is shown below. It's not detailed enough to be a honest-to-goodness engineering drawing but, it suited my purpose.

    orb_scematic.jpg

    The next image shows the rough milled orb. In doing the rough cuts with a band saw, the scrap was saved because it can be used in other parts of the overthruster.

    orb0.jpg

    After more machining and drilling the final orb is shown below.

    orb1.jpg orb2.jpg orb3.jpg
     
  18. lharles

    lharles Well-Known Member

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    Oh, dear heavens, I love what you're doing. :D Thank you for including your schematic, too. :)
     
  19. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Loving this!
     
  20. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The cover plates define the overall shape of the overthruster. Unlike the wooden prototype, the top and bottom cover plates for the aluminum build are identical in size and shape. The only difference is in the hole pattern for fastening to the bezel and to other parts (the upper 'intake' and the bottom 'chevron'). Referring to the schematic, the rear portion of the cover plates are based on a 30-60-90 triangle. The removed portions are also 30-60-90 triangles. The forward portion is based on a 45-45-90 triangle with a similar, smaller, triangle remover from the nose.

    coverplate_scematic.jpg

    The picture below shows partially completed cover plates. The top cover plate currently has three holes for fastening to the bezel. The holes are sized for 2-56 machine screws. Additional holes will be added later, after a casting mold is made for the top cover plate and upper 'intake.' Also, the plan is to put in an internal speaker (the kind found in musical greeting cards) that will produce the characteristic sound of the overthruster. To accommodate the speaker an appropriately sized hole will be added underneath the fins of the intake. The bottom cover plate currently has two holes. The reason for the 'missing' hole is that it would interfere with the layout of the bottom 'chevron.' So, in order to give the bezel some strength, the 'bridge' and 'nose' pieces of the bezel will be fastened together underneath the cover plate. I'll show how this was done in a future post.

    coverplate.jpg
     
  21. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    The piece of the bezel that I call the 'knuckle' assembly has two major components, the 'knuckle' and one of two 'wedges' that are use in the build. The knuckle sports the 'stepped pyramid' detail and is fastened to the orb underneath the cantilevered portion of the orb switch plate support using two 6-32 NC machine screws. The wedge is based on a 30-60-90 triangle and has a tenon that fits in a slot in the knuckle to support the 'face plate.' The face plate 'floats' between the knuckle and the wedge.

    knuckle_schematic.jpg wedge_schematic.jpg

    The two following pictures show two views of the knuckle and wedge. The small holes on the top and bottom are drilled and tapped for 2-56 machine screws, for fastening the cover plates. The large hole is drilled and tapped for an 8-32 NC set screw, for securing the wedge.

    knuckle1.jpg

    knuckle2.jpg

    Here the completed knuckle assembly.

    knuckle3.jpg

    The last picture of this post shows the knuckle assembly fastened to the orb.

    orb_knuckle.jpg
     
  22. Funky

    Funky Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I think we can all agree that this is the BEST OO to date!
     
  23. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Agreed Funky. I call for a run of this stainless steel gem. What say you docatonic? Feel up to milling about 10 of these bad boys :)
     
  24. nick daring

    nick daring Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Stunning work!
     
  25. The Schlitzie

    The Schlitzie Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    That thing is gorgeous!
     
  26. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    First of all, I'd like to thank everyone for their kind comments. As far as firing up the good ol' milling machine for a production run… I'll have to give it more thought. Although that was my original intent, after each part I milled it became less and less attractive. Plan B was to make resin castings for 'static' versions that would not have all of the electrical innards. However, since you asked, I'll mull the idea over again.

    Another component that was modified for the new design is the thumb assembly. It consists of two parts, the thumb piece and the thumb plate.

    thumb_schematic.jpg thumbplate_schematic.jpg

    The next picture shows the milled thumb piece and thumb plate.

    thumb1.jpg

    Note that the bottom of the thumb piece has a 'hang nail' (pun intended) that sweeps back at a 30 degree angle. The hang nail slips in a recess milled into the orb giving the appearance that the orb is wrapped around the thumb piece. The thumb piece also has a half-cylinder groove milled at a 45 degree angle. More on this in a bit. Also note that the thumb plate has a large oblong hole in addition to two smaller holes and another medium sized hole. The two small holes are sized for two 2-56 machine screws that fasten the thumb plate to the thumb piece. The medium sized hole is for a 6-32 NC machine screw that attaches the thumb assembly to the orb. The oblong hole and the groove in the thumb piece accommodate the 'tube' that pierces the orb and protrudes into the body of the overthruster. The tube will house three 1.5V button batteries, providing 4.5V to power the LEDs, sound system and a programmable micro-controller.The micro-controller will be used to 'animate' the overthruster when the various switches are pressed.

    Here is the thumb assembly.

    thumb2.jpg

    The next few pictures show different views of the thumb and knuckle assemblies fastened to the orb.

    thumb_orb0.jpg thumb_orb1.jpg

    thumb_orb2.jpg thumb_orb3.jpg

    This will be my last post of the day. If you see where I hail from, you know that there is a ball game that requires mandatory viewing. Roll Tide!
     
  27. Blaxmyth

    Blaxmyth Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Just a suggestion. I think you should remove the word 'Newbie" from this thread title! :D
     
  28. ahoudini

    ahoudini Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This is some kind of serious work! Wow! I want one and I had to look up what it was! (I only saw the film once a long time ago). Now that is a cool looking prop!
     
  29. jdegraff

    jdegraff Member

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    No s#!t! STUNNING work.
     
  30. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Well, I really do consider myself a newbie to replica prop building. It's just that I am an * retentive newbie with O.C.D. ;)

    The final components that make up the overthruster bezel are the bridge and nose assembly. The nose assembly has, you guessed it, two pieces: the nose and the second of the two wedges that were discussed earlier.

    bridge_scematic.jpg nose_schematic.jpg

    I also mentioned in a previous post that there was a 'missing' hole on the bottom cover plate. To add strength to the bezel for this redesign, the bridge and nose pieces were fastened together. To do this I used a lap joint that is fastened by a 2-56 machine screw. The bridge supports both the upper and lower switch plates.

    bridge1.jpg bridge2.jpg

    The next pictures show the two pieces of the nose assembly prior to and after assembly. The larger of the two holes on each side of the nose are drilled and tapped for 8-42 NC set screws. The smaller holes are drilled and tapped for 2-56 machine screws, for fastening the cover plates. Also, note that the outside lap on the nose piece has a countersunk hole so that the head of the screw securing the bridge to the nose is below the cover plate. The nose helps support the lower switch plate.

    nose1.jpg nose2.jpg

    nose3.jpg nose4.jpg

    The next pictures show the attached bridge and nose assembly. The later has the switch plates attached. I'll discuss the switch plates along with the face plate later.

    bridge_nose1.jpg

    bridge_nose2.jpg

    With all of the bezel pieces complete, the next picture shows the overall layout of the pieces. It also gives a feel for how much 'real estate' is available for the internal electrical/electronic components.

    bezel1.jpg
     
  31. BrundelFly

    BrundelFly Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Nice Job on this!!

    Pic of the original that I took a few years back. You might want the paint/weathering reference.

    OVER_cer.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2013
  32. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Thanks BrundelFly! I have been thinking about how to finish the surfaces. Everything from paint to anodizing. Thanks for the great reference!
     
  33. Peanuts

    Peanuts New Member

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    Absolutely stunning, cant wait to see the final piece ! I'm really digging the wood version as well.

    Peanuts
     
  34. BrundelFly

    BrundelFly Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You are welcome. Sorry I can't find the other pics. If I do, Ill post. I had pics of the case too someplace.
     
  35. laellee

    laellee Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This thread's a little dusty, anymore progress? I was looking forward to finished pics! :)
     
  36. joberg

    joberg Master Member

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    It's...it's jewellery :eek:cool Best of the best OO everrrr!!
     
  37. JeffZugale

    JeffZugale New Member

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    Fantastic build! I'm going to build one of these (styrene) for my dad-in-law for Xmas, I hope it's okay for me to reference your part-out images?

    It's been a long time, did it get finished?
     
  38. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    It's been a while. In the mean time I discovered 3D printers. This one has room for an Arduino Nano, LiPo battery, power converter and the switches & LEDs. I'll post a couple of images. The color of the filament is not very photogenic. More to come.
     

    Attached Files:

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  39. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Sweet Buckaroo I need that file!!!
     
  40. Cameron

    Cameron Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Love it. I’ve been wanting a hollow version to power up with some lights and sound forever. Would you sell me a copy or allow me the file for a print?
     
  41. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    I'd be happy to sell you a copy. The parts take a lot of time to print so, I'll start printing them this weekend. In the mean time I'll post some pictures of the parts before they have been cleaned up so you can see if you're still interested. I'll also list the additional hardware and electrical pieces that I have picked out for the one I am building.
     
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  42. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    As advertised, the design can hold an Arduino Nano, power converter and LiPo battery (see photo). Components selected for the design are shown in a photo. The 'top plate' has a cavity for a speaker (see photo)
     

    Attached Files:

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  43. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    I used Autodesk Fusion 360 for the 3D design. The design consists of 7 components. Below are some screen shots from the software. The slots and rectangular holes will be explained in a later post.
    Orb1.jpg Orb2.jpg Top Plate.jpg Face.jpg Thumb.jpg Barrel.jpg Switch Plate.jpg Bottom Chevron.jpg Assembly1.jpg Assembly2.jpg
     
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  44. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Printed Batch 2.

    Printer: Anycubic Kossel Linear Plus V2 (a delta style printer)
    Slicing Software: Ultimaker Cura 3.6.0
    Filament: Rigid.ink PLA 1.75mm Pearl Silver
    Nozzle Temperature: 185C
    Bed Temperature: 60C
    Layer Height: 0.06mm

    The images below are the parts straight off the printer with some of the brim removed. The part names also have their print time. Total print time was just shy of 15 hours. Note that the parts are not entirely smooth and require some post-processing. But, also keep in mind that the images are magnified quite a bit (The entire model is only about 3 inches in length). They clean up very nicely.
    Barrel_25min.jpg
    Chevron_2hr_21min.jpg Face_1hr_30min.jpg Orb_6hr_36min.jpg Switch_27min.jpg Thumb_55min.jpg Top_2hr_42min.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2019
  45. docatomic

    docatomic New Member

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    Clean up process next
     
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