New to sculpting: First zombie bust WIP

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GrimmOmen

Member
Hello,
I'm totally new to sculpting, but thought I'd post my first WIP. I'm working on a zombie bust, nothing realistic, just something that will allow me to focus on the basics like how to work with Sculpey, what the tools do, how to use them, and just how to start making as many mistakes as possible. :)

Stil have some things to smooth out, details to add and details to remove. I know it's pretty amaturish, but given that I've never sculpted before, I'm happy to see that there seems to be a modicum of sculpting talent to hopefully build on.

http://s278.photobucket.com/albums/kk103/jpharrod/Zombie_WIP/

You folks do some amazing work here, I hope to be able to approach your level of work at some point in the future!

Regards,
-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

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jaybible

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Damn man that's a great start...making loads of mistakes is half the fun (althought you don't think it at the time when u scrap hrs of work:p)

How are you finding working with sculpey?
 

GrimmOmen

Member
Damn man that's a great start...making loads of mistakes is half the fun (althought you don't think it at the time when u scrap hrs of work:p)

How are you finding working with sculpey?
Exactly. I measure my proficiency by my willingness and ability to be able to cut out large swaths of something if it's not working and rebuild those areas over again... I was able to cut the lower rib cage out and start over, but did so with a little tremble in my hands LOL. I'm a professional artist by trade, so I had to say my little mantra "fear is the mind killer..." no wait, that's not mine - ah yes, it's "every time I have to start over, I'm always happier with the results." But it's only a little comfort given my newness to this art form.

As far as Sculpey goes, I really didn't like working with it at first, then after watching a couple of you tube videos, I noticed the tools they were using with the little balls on the end, so I bought a set of tools that has those in it and my experience is completly different.


One question that comes to mind, I see work done in clay, and some in Sculpey, what are some of the factors that you guys consider in deciding which to use for your pieces? Also, is it possible to dye Sculpey? I love bathe translucent nature of the clay, and I was thinking that if I wanted to make a blue creature, painting it would effectively destroy that translucent quality. How do you guys get around that?

Thanks for the encouragement, and looking forward to improving my skill!

-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

GrimmOmen

Member
Well, I'm calling this one done. I think it turned out pretty good for a first sculpt, but man, do I have a lot to learn about anatomy - I kept my "anatomy for the artist" handy, but getting those muscle groups right is going to take some practice.

BTW, baking this super Sculpey, the directions say about 275 for 15 minutes for every 1/4 inch of thickness. Do you just measure the thickest point on your model or do you average? I don't want this to get discolored, so any advice would be greatly appreciated!



-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

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chanfan

Well-Known Member
When I baked my endoskull, I went a couple degrees below recommended and kept it in the oven a bit longer. That way I didn't have to worry about burning it. I let it cool down in the oven with the oven door slightly open.

It you worry about burning it you could always boil it.. if you have a pot big enough to fit it.
 

GrimmOmen

Member
When I baked my endoskull, I went a couple degrees below recommended and kept it in the oven a bit longer. That way I didn't have to worry about burning it. I let it cool down in the oven with the oven door slightly open.

It you worry about burning it you could always boil it.. if you have a pot big enough to fit it.
Thanks for the advice! I just picked up the book "Pop Sculpture" and there was a mention in there about one guy who puts the oven down to 170 and cooks for an extended time period. I'm thinking about 200 should be a fair balance between not burning it, and appeasing my impatient side!


-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

chanfan

Well-Known Member
Yep that should probably do the trick!
I wouldn't worry too much about it though, I think burning it would take quite alot of effort, keeping the heat way too high and basically forgetting the piece in the oven for hours. I've had some of my stuff for twice as long as recommended and it's never shown any sign of getting burnt.

Just keep your eye on the sculpture as it is getting baked, to be on the safe side.
 

GrimmOmen

Member
Yep that should probably do the trick!
I wouldn't worry too much about it though, I think burning it would take quite alot of effort, keeping the heat way too high and basically forgetting the piece in the oven for hours. I've had some of my stuff for twice as long as recommended and it's never shown any sign of getting burnt.

Just keep your eye on the sculpture as it is getting baked, to be on the safe side.
Ok, that helps calm my nerves a bit. I decided to knock out a base for him and try popping that one in the oven just to make sure, that way, worst case scenario I have to remake the base, which beats the heck outta my wife getting upset cause I botched a sculpture she's already adopted!

Your advice and expertise is very much appreciated.

Regards,

-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

chanfan

Well-Known Member
Cool, let us know when it's baked, and how it went! :)
I'm fairly new to using super sculpey myself so I'm just glad I can help!
 

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GrimmOmen

Member
So the base was about a half an inch thick, so I baked it for 45 minutes @ 200 degrees. Then another 15 @ 220 and it turned out beautifully! No scorching or discoloration. I think I'll re- do the base as I think it shrank in the baking. Either that or I misjudged the space he was supposed to fit in. :)


-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

GrimmOmen

Member
Got another question, I'm going to start my next sculpt, off of a design this time, and I plan on using an armature, but one question I have is, the rod that runs horizontally to the wire armature - when you're done with the sculpt, how do you get the thing off the arm? Saw it off?


-Grimm
(Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD)
 

NormanF

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
If you are using your kitchen oven make sure you clean it afterwards. You don't want toxic residue in your food.
 

Contec

Master Member
If you are using your kitchen oven make sure you clean it afterwards. You don't want toxic residue in your food.
You can also put the Sculpture in a oven bag like the ones you use for turkey

The crap will stick to the bag instead...
 

chanfan

Well-Known Member
There are no toxic residue unless you burn it! But keep it on some kind of disposable oven paper.
 

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