More fun with fiberoptics - lighting a Star Destroyer - FIN!

Matsuo

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I was thinking backlighting would be great...heh "grate"..LOL but that may require something pretty bright, So I figured I'd just settle for a green glow from within. Experimenting is the operative word in my case, small electronics is not my strong suit...ever blow up an LED?...I have..


You like playin spot the greeblie huh?...well when I'm done You will have all kindsa fun....


Matt
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
Home stretch. Basic paint done. Couple of minor problems to solve (like a gap between the removeable engine pod and the upper hull), and paint weathering of the engines, and to bring out a bit more detail.
And then I settle down to carefully carving ~400 fiber strands flush with the hull



 
How exactly does "pre-shadowing" work? Also when you do a wash, you just water down some acrylic and slosh it on then wipe it down? Is that right? I can't seem to get it.
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
several variations

The pre-shadowing gets used a lot in scale-armor circles, minutiae-filled discussions on 'scale-paint' effects, formulae for lightening base paints based on the scale of the piece. etc.

'pre-shading' or 'pre-shadowing' is usually used to darken shadowed recesses, panel lines, grooves, whatever. And when you do your final coats, you work up gradually to your final finish, so that paint doesn't completely coat these recesses. The darker / black pre-coat shows through.
Sort of the obverse of 'highlighting'

Similar to applying a dirty 'wash' (be it muddy thinner, acrylics, oils, pastels, whatever.), excepting that it goes down first, where washes are done after base painting and the solvent the dark pigments are suspended in are used to to transport the pigment to the low / recessed areas.

Have also seen 'pre-shading' down with light colors as well. Shoot the grooves aorund a panel with a dark shade. shoot the central area / raised portions of a panel with a light / white shade, then apply you base color. And stop before the paint shading is 100% obscured.

Really takes an airbrush to have a suitable control over how much / how fast the base paint is applied.

Washes work most effectively when you can wipe down a surface easily afterward, and/or when you want to leave the stain as-is, to be exactly what it is - a fluid stain.
And especially effective when you want a whole subject to be grimy.

Washes are often done with solutions and paints that won't interact with the paints you've already applied. Wouldn't want to take a nicely applied paint job and then hose it off with a fresh application of thinner. Then again, that may be the effect you are seeking (say a white-winter camoflage coat, that's practically worn away).

Another technique is to do your pristine, 'fresh off the assembly-line" paintjob, then clearcoat it for added protection, before rubbing and wiping on it.


I'll round up some samples and throw together a new 'weathering / paint effects' thread on this stuff, maybe we'll get some good info from other experienced folks...
 

Qui-Gonzalez

Master Member
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rayra wrote:
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And then I settle down to carefully carving ~400 fiber strands flush with the hull


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Damn, that would have me pulling the nubby hairs outta my head!

Gonz
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
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Qui-Gonzalez wrote:
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Damn, that would have me pulling the nubby hairs outta my head!
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pretty much the same thing
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
sorta. most of them are unreachable with those and I'll have to use tweezers to hold and a fresh X-Acto blade.
 
Great info Rich. I had heard of pre-shading on Starship Modeler but never knew the details.
You are doing an excellent job with that Star Destroyer too! Alot of progress since I saw it last.
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
alrighty. Paint's finished.
Last step: Trim the fiber. (ugh)

"400 pieces of fiber on the SD, 400 pieces of fiber, trim one down, toss it around, 399 pieces of fiber on the SD..."
 

rayra

Well-Known Member
ok, ALL DONE.
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and you'll all have to wait 16-24hrs for pics, my steenkin' digicam batteries are STONE DEAD.
 

vaderdarth

Master Member
Want a cool tip on the fiberoptics???
I did mine and don't have pics of it, but randomly, I used permanent sharpie markers and colored some of the lights red and blue .......only 5 or 6 on the whole model, but it really made it appear that there was something different going on in parts of the ship........and if you don't like it, sand it off or take it off with alcohol.
Dave
 

Shadowboss

New Member
WOW!! Now that's cool!! Nice job Rich!

I have one of those still sealed in the box... Feel like doing another?




Just kidding, my wife wont even let me open in let alone build it!
 
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