Milliput vs Free Form Air epoxy putty?

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by Kormier, May 8, 2012.

  1. Kormier

    Kormier Well-Known Member

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    Hi. I have been trying to get my hands on some milliput but all I can find so far at Canadian stores that seems similar is an epoxy putty called FreeForm. Has anyone used it before? I want to use putty to refine the shape of some peps I am working on. From its description I think it would work but I thought I would ask if anyone has used it before I get some. Here's the product description:
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    Free Form Air Epoxy Putty Quart Kit 1.8Lbs (799779)
    Free Form® is an extremely lightweight epoxy putty suitable for an infinite variety of industrial and art-related applications. This is a low-odor, low shrinkage putty that is unique, inexpensive and easy to use. Free Form® is mixed by hand with a 1A:1B by volume mix ratio. It offers a long working time and cures overnight at room temperature to a hard, rigid epoxy that is very strong with modeling board-like properties. Cured Free Form® is so lightweight, it will float in water. It can be sanded, shaped, drilled, tapped and CNC machined/routered. It will readily accept any paint. Free Form can also be color pigmented with SO-Strong® or Ignite® colorants.

    After mixing, Free Form® can be pressed into a mold to make a lightweight, detailed casting. It will hold vertical surfaces and can be applied to almost any surface including polystyrene foam for rough sculpting. Free Form® putty can also be used to make rigid support shells or mother molds.

    Epoxy Laminating; Laminate Free Form® putty in between layers of EpoxAmite® Laminating Epoxy and fiberglass cloth, carbon or other fiber for making lightweight composite parts. Eliminates the need to make multiple layers of laminating with liquid epoxy; saves time and labor.

    Epoxy Tooling Applications use as a filleting material. Also good for jig and fixture construction.

    Used as a lightweight adhesive, Free Form® will bond to itself and a variety of surfaces including wood, stone and EpoxAcoat® Red surface coat epoxy. Free Form will even cure under water.

    Pot Life/Working Time; this material is mass sensitive. The more material you mix at one time, the less time you have to work with it. Working tip,; If mixing a large quantity, flatten putty with a rolling pin to reduce mass concentration and extend pot life.

    Thickness; 1.5 inch (3.81 cm) pot life is 30 minutes, handling time is 2.5 hours, full cure in 24 hours.
    Thickness; 3/8" (0.95 cm) pot life is 60 minutes, handling time is 4 hours, full cure in 24 hours.
    Thickness; 1/8" (0.32 cm) - pot life is 120 minutes; handling time is 8 hours, full cure in 24 hours.
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    Any info on how good this putty is would be helpful. Thanks!
     
  2. JMChladek

    JMChladek Sr Member

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    I've never used Free Form. But have you tried to find a source for Aves Apoxie sculpt? It seems to be superior to Milliput in most every way and has none of the apparent drawbacks that some faster drying 2 part putties have (i.e. doesn't key into surfaces and cracks off when feathered in). Plus, Aves (like Milliput) does NOT shrink.

    Welcome to Aves Studio

    Checking their store locator, there appears to be five places in and around Toronto that carry the stuff (and I have a friend in London Ontario that uses it for his models).
     
  3. trekriffic

    trekriffic Sr Member

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    And of course you can buy AVES online at the SSM Store.
     
  4. Kormier

    Kormier Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I will definitely check it out.
     
  5. Bigturc

    Bigturc Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Kormier,
    Did you find anything local with this? I have no clue where to find this!

    For those who worked with Apoxie sculpt, I've got a piece that got cast in polyester and have broken edges all around .. is that a good product to rebuilt them?
     
  6. Prefect42

    Prefect42 Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Bigturc,

    I think the real question is what isn't Aves Apoxy sculpt good for? I've used it on a variety of materials, including resin, and it's fantastic. Best part for me is it can be smoothed with water. Saves a good deal of time and effort with sanding afterwards. And it is quite strong once cured.

    Ted.
     
  7. Bigturc

    Bigturc Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    So let me get this straight,

    I've done Studio Scale stuff and filled resin gaps, pinholes and what not with glazing putty (BONDO) .. I could have used Apoxie sculpt?

    I'm receiving polyester based cast, that I'm fixing, puttying etc .. I could use Apoxie sculpt?

    I'm peping with Smooth-On Epoxamite right now, I could also use Apoxie Sculpt?

    If all those are true, I'll get some and try it!!!
     
  8. Kormier

    Kormier Well-Known Member

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    I have not looked into it yet but I will soon. Trying to finish some other things first.
     
  9. Bigturc

    Bigturc Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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  10. JMChladek

    JMChladek Sr Member

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    I don't know if Aves would work for filling pinholes in resin unless they are big ones. For the small stuff, you are better off using something more liquid or paste like, such as Bondo. Aves is better for fixing deep divots or big defects (or adding bulk to a part, or reprofiling a shape on a part where material needs to be added).
     
  11. Bigturc

    Bigturc Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Agreed, that's why I'm going for Evercoat products too!! :thumbsup
     

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