mad men last episode coming soon

ultraman

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
i love mad men the tv show and i'm pretty sad to see it ending here soon on may 17th.

i'm starting to wonder if it ends with our good ol buddy don draper taking a suicidal leap off the the new firms sky scraper.
(just like we see in the opening sequence of every show)
i'd kind of get it if he did....must suck to be one of the best ad men alive only to get swallowed up in a firm where he just becomes another commercialized zombie working for the man.


anyone got any predictions or thoughts?!?!!?
 

DL 44 Blaster

Sr Member
I think he's moving to CA. He was staring out the window of his first meeting at the jumbo jet in the distance. I think he's outta town. Plus he's already half way across the country.

I sincerely hope it doesn't end on a suicide. BUT it would be kind of poetic since that animated falling character looks a lot like a shadow of Don. A clever ending, but I don't know .......at the same time I don't want a "happily ever after ending for him either"........

I should also mention that I didn't see last weeks' episode yet.....5/10. It's on DVR....I'm watching it on Sat. night. My predictions could be way off given what happened in that episode.

Either way, I'll be watching!
 

Solo4114

Master Member
I highly doubt it'll be the skyscraper dive. I actually don't know what he'll do, but he's been doing some interesting stuff this second half of Season 7.
 

astroboy

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I don't think that he'll kill himself. This show has always avoided hard slashes of drama like that. It's far more subdued.

Actually, I'm gonna predict that the show will end with him simply reinventing himself. Arriving somewhere and introducing himself as someone else.



But I have to say, Betty and Henry were pretty brilliant in the last episode. Great stuff from them.
 

Solo4114

Master Member
I don't think that he'll kill himself. This show has always avoided hard slashes of drama like that. It's far more subdued.

Actually, I'm gonna predict that the show will end with him simply reinventing himself. Arriving somewhere and introducing himself as someone else.



But I have to say, Betty and Henry were pretty brilliant in the last episode. Great stuff from them.
I agree with this. I could very easily see Don arriving in, say, L.A. or something, and partially making up a backstory for himself as a former ad guy, and introducing himself as Dick Whitman as he starts a new life. I think there's a limited possibility he'll return to his family, but he's not going back to advertising at McCann. The only way he'd work for them is as their golden boy, and they've made it clear that he's one of many golden boys. That's not how Don rolls, so Don rolls on out of there and across America, shedding his former self along the way, and unburdening himself of his sins (or so he hopes). We'll see how well that holds up, but I don't think he'll end as a pavement pancake having taken a swan dive from 20+ stories up.
 

ultraman

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
i do kind of hope he ends up on the beach with a little umbrella drink....starting a whole new life with a whole new name.
we've seen him do it a couple times already and why not?!?!
he's got all the money in the world to live the rest of his life with.:cool



I agree with this. I could very easily see Don arriving in, say, L.A. or something, and partially making up a backstory for himself as a former ad guy, and introducing himself as Dick Whitman as he starts a new life. I think there's a limited possibility he'll return to his family, but he's not going back to advertising at McCann. The only way he'd work for them is as their golden boy, and they've made it clear that he's one of many golden boys. That's not how Don rolls, so Don rolls on out of there and across America, shedding his former self along the way, and unburdening himself of his sins (or so he hopes). We'll see how well that holds up, but I don't think he'll end as a pavement pancake having taken a swan dive from 20+ stories up.
 

DL 44 Blaster

Sr Member
I kinda thought since there's still the clientele and business real estate in CA that he might head west and build that into something.

I really like the idea of him shedding Don Draper for Dick Whitman! That would be cool. He's been soul searching for a while and returning to his given name would make sense.
 

0neiros

Master Member
My AMC Feed last Sunday was bad, rendering the episode almost unwatchable. They better have it crisp this Sunday or I'm going to be pissed.
 

modelcitizen

Sr Member
what if his half brother had faked his death with the 5 grand don gave him.(he learned from big bro). what if don is pushed out a high place by said half brother.
 

astroboy

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Spoilers!!!




So I'm guessing that don left the retreat, went back to mcaan and came up with the coke ad?


VERY safe ending
 

0neiros

Master Member
That's the brilliant inference. Good write-off for all characters (Except Betty but I loathed her so it's all good), especially Pete.
 

ultraman

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
that's how i took it also astroboy.

he found inner peace at the hippy compound then went back and made the most well known ad in history!
fantastic ending!
at least he didn't go the suicide route....which it was looking like he was going to do towards the end of the show.
i really enjoyed the entire run of this show!
my hat's off to the whole team that brought this thing together!
:cool




Spoilers!!!




So I'm guessing that don left the retreat, went back to mcaan and came up with the coke ad?


VERY safe ending
 

astroboy

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
On the whole, I didn't enjoy the outcome of the series. It was a bit of the low hanging fruit.

Essentially, they all lived happily ever after. The only tough break was given to Sally, who seemed to be morphing into the same thing that tied her mother down.

And I REALLY rolled my eyes to the dinging light bulb sound as Don meditated at the end
 

Solo4114

Master Member
I loved it. I didn't think it was safe either.


I thought that the finale showed both character growth and permanence of characteristics. People change, but they don't change the core of who they are. They evolve it, instead. And to me, that was pretty much the entire finale and the last season. Consider the major players.

Pete

Pete had, for pretty much the entire run of the series, been a guy who always wanted more and was never satisfied with what he had, even when what he had was what he had just wanted. This last season, though, Pete basically had a mid-life crisis and realized that forever chasing the next brass ring holds no purpose to it. Moreover, he realized he'd wasted the one thing that really could've made him happy. His reunion with his wife and daughter, and his success at Learjet allowed him to evolve. He's still a stiff blueblood and will always be that, but at least he'd finally let go of the things that had driven him -- to misery, I should add -- in the past.

Joan

Joan changed in, I think, two really, really important ways. And they're ways that, I think, people might otherwise miss. In the past, Joan had basically tied herself to men who could provide her with a better life. Men she loved, yes, but still men who could help her life. Roger, her doctor husband, the guy she met this season, they all fit a general profile of a successful or upwardly mobile person who can basically give her the kind of life she wants. But the thing is, with this last guy (whose name eludes me), she realized that the life she wanted was one of equal partnership where she could determine her own path. Rather than be tied down to this man, she chose professional success. Now, granted, her hands were somewhat freed by Roger's revision to his will. And that brings us to the second major change. Joan had, especially in this season, felt trapped by her life. She had obligations to her son to provide for him, and she needed to make money to do that. Roger's will revision, naming her son as a beneficiary, changes all of that. But here's the really, really interesting thing: instead of it freeing her to live a life of luxury with her rich new boyfriend, it frees her to pursue personal professional satisfaction. She can take a risk because Roger's backing her play (in a way). Even if her business fails (although it appears to be doing quite well), she knows her son is going to be fine. It's that freedom that lets her make the bold move of starting her production company.

Roger

Roger remains the perpetually charming silver fox. He'll drink and smoke and eat us all into the grave, and crack wit while he does it. And we'll be jealous of him for being able to indulge as a bon vivant, and love him anyway because he'll make us laugh. That part doesn't change. What does change, however, is that Roger has, apparently, found his real match in his third wife. She can go toe to toe with him and doesn't take his crap. In a way, it's a return to what he might've had with his first wife, but age has, apparently, freed him of the desire to chase skirts anymore and be able to really enjoy a woman who can match him line for line, and drink for drink. And hey, he even learns French for her.

Peggy

In some ways, Peggy remains herself. She's prim, uptight, and risk-averse. There's a brief moment where she seriously considers Joan's proposal, but turns it down, and hates herself for doing so (hence her lashing out at Stan and the whole "Spoken like a failure!" line -- that's really directed at herself). But she finally does take a risk -- just not a professional one. She puts her feelings on the line with Stan, lets her defenses down, and is actually able to enjoy the part of life that isn't work. In a way, you get the sense that this makes work that much more bearable for her. If Peggy's entrance to McCann was a testament to "She'll be just fine" in a professional sense, her relationship with Stan leaves the viewer feeling the same way about her personal life. But bear in mind, it's not as if she suddenly became a different person. She still turned Joan down, and from the look of it, that was a risk that would've paid off. So, it's not quite as "happy ending" as it could've been for her.

Don

To me, Don's arc this season is the most interesting. First, it perfectly mirrors the opening credits. He does go through this long fall as he sheds his life and ends up at the yoga retreat....only to wind up right back in the chair, smoking a cigarette. That ending is strongly implied in this episode, both in Peggy's "Don't you want to work on Coca Cola?" and "McCann would take you back in a heartbeat" lines, and in the Coke ad. So, in terms of "But what happens to Don?" the short answer appears to be "He clears his head, goes back home, and invents the Coke commercial."

But to me, the real purpose of this last half of the season is Don's emotional journey. He sheds all aspects of his former persona as he travels west. He confesses his sins to various people, takes "penance" (in the form of a phone book to the face, the loss of his car, rejection by Stephanie and his kids, etc.). To my way of thinking, Don's emotional journey has ultimately been one about coming to terms with himself and learning about love. I know that sounds hokey, but if you look at Don's background and the events of this last episode, I think it's pretty clear. Don spent his childhood hated by his father, living and working in a brothel where "love" was bought and sold, he went to war and took another man's identity to come home, and then spent the rest of his life running from his past. All of that, ultimately, translates into Don really...not loving himself and not believing himself worthy of love. It's why all of his romantic relationships are based on power, and especially him having it. When the relationships start to spin out of his control, that's the point where he moves on, starts over with a new woman, and thinks this time it will be different. Except, it isn't. And he's always drawn to finding another woman that he can "make" love him because, again, he has no idea what love is.

The penultimate scene for Don, where the other man confesses to feeling invisible and not even knowing what love is, and Don's embrace of him and recognition of his own demons in this man, that's an incredibly powerful scene. To me, that, plus the very closing scene, is all about one fact: Don Draper/Dick Whitman has finally made peace with himself and allowed himself to just be who he really is. For years, he felt that the "Don Draper" thing was a persona he adopted. What he failed to realize is that the persona is still him. He created it, sure, but he created it. He is literally a self-made man. At the very end, I get the sense that he's realizing this or something like it, and has finally forgiven himself and learned to ultimately love himself. Even if that means loving the fact that he uses "love" to sell nylons for a living. He can still be worthy of love in spite of what he does. And ultimately, I think he comes home to McCann, at peace with himself, and is able to knock it out of the park with the Coke ad.

So, again, Don changes in some really critical ways....but he's still Don at the end. He's just a happier, more settled, more secure Don. To my way of thinking, that's about as happy an ending as anyone could ever ask for.
 

Solo4114

Master Member
Forgot to add one to the list:

Betty

Betty's story ends tragically, but -- from my point of view -- with a particular sense of accomplishment. Betty in the first season was kind of a "Stepford Wife." Over time, she lost that, but basically just acted like a teenager. In the tail end of the final season, though, we see her making real strides as a person. She goes back to college to get a degree in psychology. Now, while it's true that she went to Bryn Mawr when she was younger, let's be clear: Betty was there to get her "Mrs." degree. She probably wasn't all that academically engaged, and didn't see education as a path to a better, more fulfilled life. Rather, she saw it as a place to meet a future husband. Yet here she is, enjoying her studies now and expanding her mind.

Her cancer diagnosis is deeply tragic -- the moreso because it comes just as she's really starting to break free of the way she lived her life in the past. But I think you have to take two important things away from her experience. First, the diagnosis does not define her. Henry berates her for not "fighting" for more time, but Betty recognizes that "fighting" for more time would just mean more time to fight. By that, I mean that she knew that undergoing a ton of procedures just to prolong her life wouldn't end up prolonging it in a meaningful way; she'd just spend all her time fighting the disease. Instead, she chose to continue going to school for as long as she could, and even kept smoking because, dammit, she was going to live her life her way, right up until the end.

It may not seem like much, especially given that death for her was imminent, but to me, that kind of self-actualization from Betty, that charting of her own course -- however bleak it may be -- is MAJOR character growth for her, and a triumph for her unto itself. It's a shame that her life went in a way that deciding to smoke with your cancer diagnosis is a major triumph of self determination, but that's more a commentary on Betty's previous life than anything else. On the whole, I think her story ends...hmm...not happily, but contentedly in a way.
 

ultraman

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
that was well writen solo nice job man!

did you also notice the desk girl:
desk girl.JPG

and the girls in the coke ad:

coke girl 1.JPG coke girl2.JPG




I loved it. I didn't think it was safe either.


I thought that the finale showed both character growth and permanence of characteristics. People change, but they don't change the core of who they are. They evolve it, instead. And to me, that was pretty much the entire finale and the last season. Consider the major players.

Pete

Pete had, for pretty much the entire run of the series, been a guy who always wanted more and was never satisfied with what he had, even when what he had was what he had just wanted. This last season, though, Pete basically had a mid-life crisis and realized that forever chasing the next brass ring holds no purpose to it. Moreover, he realized he'd wasted the one thing that really could've made him happy. His reunion with his wife and daughter, and his success at Learjet allowed him to evolve. He's still a stiff blueblood and will always be that, but at least he'd finally let go of the things that had driven him -- to misery, I should add -- in the past.

Joan

Joan changed in, I think, two really, really important ways. And they're ways that, I think, people might otherwise miss. In the past, Joan had basically tied herself to men who could provide her with a better life. Men she loved, yes, but still men who could help her life. Roger, her doctor husband, the guy she met this season, they all fit a general profile of a successful or upwardly mobile person who can basically give her the kind of life she wants. But the thing is, with this last guy (whose name eludes me), she realized that the life she wanted was one of equal partnership where she could determine her own path. Rather than be tied down to this man, she chose professional success. Now, granted, her hands were somewhat freed by Roger's revision to his will. And that brings us to the second major change. Joan had, especially in this season, felt trapped by her life. She had obligations to her son to provide for him, and she needed to make money to do that. Roger's will revision, naming her son as a beneficiary, changes all of that. But here's the really, really interesting thing: instead of it freeing her to live a life of luxury with her rich new boyfriend, it frees her to pursue personal professional satisfaction. She can take a risk because Roger's backing her play (in a way). Even if her business fails (although it appears to be doing quite well), she knows her son is going to be fine. It's that freedom that lets her make the bold move of starting her production company.

Roger

Roger remains the perpetually charming silver fox. He'll drink and smoke and eat us all into the grave, and crack wit while he does it. And we'll be jealous of him for being able to indulge as a bon vivant, and love him anyway because he'll make us laugh. That part doesn't change. What does change, however, is that Roger has, apparently, found his real match in his third wife. She can go toe to toe with him and doesn't take his crap. In a way, it's a return to what he might've had with his first wife, but age has, apparently, freed him of the desire to chase skirts anymore and be able to really enjoy a woman who can match him line for line, and drink for drink. And hey, he even learns French for her.

Peggy

In some ways, Peggy remains herself. She's prim, uptight, and risk-averse. There's a brief moment where she seriously considers Joan's proposal, but turns it down, and hates herself for doing so (hence her lashing out at Stan and the whole "Spoken like a failure!" line -- that's really directed at herself). But she finally does take a risk -- just not a professional one. She puts her feelings on the line with Stan, lets her defenses down, and is actually able to enjoy the part of life that isn't work. In a way, you get the sense that this makes work that much more bearable for her. If Peggy's entrance to McCann was a testament to "She'll be just fine" in a professional sense, her relationship with Stan leaves the viewer feeling the same way about her personal life. But bear in mind, it's not as if she suddenly became a different person. She still turned Joan down, and from the look of it, that was a risk that would've paid off. So, it's not quite as "happy ending" as it could've been for her.

Don

To me, Don's arc this season is the most interesting. First, it perfectly mirrors the opening credits. He does go through this long fall as he sheds his life and ends up at the yoga retreat....only to wind up right back in the chair, smoking a cigarette. That ending is strongly implied in this episode, both in Peggy's "Don't you want to work on Coca Cola?" and "McCann would take you back in a heartbeat" lines, and in the Coke ad. So, in terms of "But what happens to Don?" the short answer appears to be "He clears his head, goes back home, and invents the Coke commercial."

But to me, the real purpose of this last half of the season is Don's emotional journey. He sheds all aspects of his former persona as he travels west. He confesses his sins to various people, takes "penance" (in the form of a phone book to the face, the loss of his car, rejection by Stephanie and his kids, etc.). To my way of thinking, Don's emotional journey has ultimately been one about coming to terms with himself and learning about love. I know that sounds hokey, but if you look at Don's background and the events of this last episode, I think it's pretty clear. Don spent his childhood hated by his father, living and working in a brothel where "love" was bought and sold, he went to war and took another man's identity to come home, and then spent the rest of his life running from his past. All of that, ultimately, translates into Don really...not loving himself and not believing himself worthy of love. It's why all of his romantic relationships are based on power, and especially him having it. When the relationships start to spin out of his control, that's the point where he moves on, starts over with a new woman, and thinks this time it will be different. Except, it isn't. And he's always drawn to finding another woman that he can "make" love him because, again, he has no idea what love is.

The penultimate scene for Don, where the other man confesses to feeling invisible and not even knowing what love is, and Don's embrace of him and recognition of his own demons in this man, that's an incredibly powerful scene. To me, that, plus the very closing scene, is all about one fact: Don Draper/Dick Whitman has finally made peace with himself and allowed himself to just be who he really is. For years, he felt that the "Don Draper" thing was a persona he adopted. What he failed to realize is that the persona is still him. He created it, sure, but he created it. He is literally a self-made man. At the very end, I get the sense that he's realizing this or something like it, and has finally forgiven himself and learned to ultimately love himself. Even if that means loving the fact that he uses "love" to sell nylons for a living. He can still be worthy of love in spite of what he does. And ultimately, I think he comes home to McCann, at peace with himself, and is able to knock it out of the park with the Coke ad.

So, again, Don changes in some really critical ways....but he's still Don at the end. He's just a happier, more settled, more secure Don. To my way of thinking, that's about as happy an ending as anyone could ever ask for.
 
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