Looking for any information on the stun gun used by Kayla Watts (DeWanda Wise) in Jurassic Park: Dominion.

RaggedEarth

New Member
I have screen grabbed all images from the movie I can and have 3D modeled what I know of it to the best of my abilities. Does anyone know of the studio or person that was in charge of creating the hand props for the movie? Or maybe concept art of it? Any information or leads on better reference images would be greatly appreciated!
JWD stungun.jpg
Screenshot 2022-09-13 180526.jpg
Screenshot 2022-09-13 180601.jpg
Screenshot 2022-09-07 160115.jpg
 

Tommy

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Perhaps you've already tried this, but I occasionally find success by individually searching the names of all the relevant credited art department crew. It's tedious, as many of them will be dead-ends, but I'd say maybe 1 in 20 generally turns out to have a decent personal website with a listed contact. Those who work in graphic design / 2d illustration as opposed to 3d sculpture / fabrication tend to be better bets, so the concept art route may be more fruitful. I also often experience better luck with those further down the totem pole who have a need to actively promote their skills, so don't discount the juniors / assistants / trainees.

Even if the crew member doesn't appear to have worked on this particular prop, an email inquiring whether they happen to know who was responsible for it (ideally including a bit of genuine praise for whatever they did contribute) may get you a lead. Just a few weeks ago, I tracked down the fabricator of a particular helmet who turned out to be entirely uncredited, thanks to contacting a credited costume design assistant who remembered the name!

Also, if you strike out with IMDb, it may be worth giving the actual credits sequence a quick skim, as not every name gets entered online.
 
Last edited:

RaggedEarth

New Member
Perhaps you've already tried this, but I occasionally find success by individually searching the names of all the relevant credited art department crew. It's tedious, as many of them will be dead-ends, but I'd say maybe 1 in 20 generally turns out to have a decent personal website with a listed contact. Those who work in graphic design / 2d illustration as opposed to 3d sculpture / fabrication tend to be better bets, so the concept art route may be more fruitful. I also often experience better luck with those further down the totem pole who have a need to actively promote their skills, so don't discount the juniors / assistants / trainees.

Even if the crew member doesn't appear to have worked on this particular prop, an email inquiring whether they happen to know who was responsible for it (ideally including a bit of genuine praise for whatever they did contribute) may get you a lead. Just a few weeks ago, I tracked down the fabricator of a particular helmet who turned out to be entirely uncredited, thanks to contacting a credited costume design assistant who remembered the name!

Also, if you strike out with IMDb, it may be worth giving the actual credits sequence a quick skim, as not every name gets entered online.
This is really good advice. I have been in the process of doing this and you are right, none of the names but one has been a dead end, david balfour the actual prop master. I can only find a phone number associated with him. But honestly I had discounted the assistants / trainees. I will start combing through them as well. I feel kina like a private eye or something lol.
 

Tommy

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I feel kina like a private eye or something lol.
Glad to help. Yeah, it can feel like that! And sometimes people will even hire a private eye... go to 11:30 for a great story told by collector / Hollywood writer Dave Mandel:


Also, I forgot to mention that social media messaging sometimes facilitates breakthroughs when personal websites / emails are nonexistent or inactive. You shouldn't expect a high rate of return - the vast majority will simply disappear into the ether, at least judging by my experience - but I've managed to reach a handful of people that way. And funny enough, save for the rare months-later exception, those who respond tend to do so almost immediately (within minutes or hours, or at most a day)!
 

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