Liquid plastic casting

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darienvader

Well-Known Member
What are your thoughts on the TASK™ 15 liquid plastic from Smooth-On for making helmet casts?

TASK™ High Performance Plastics

TASK™ Plastics are a new generation of performance urethane
casting resins that offer superior physical properties compared to our popular Smooth-Cast line of general purpose casting resins.

TASK™ Plastics feature convenient mix ratios, low viscosities, high tensile and flexural strength, as well as high flexural modulus. These plastics were formulated for a variety of industrial applications including making prototype models, pattern making, and making high impact rotational castings (TASK™ 15)
 

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replicaprops

Official Licensee
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I use task for tooling patterns. It is very hard and can handle very high heat. I thing its a great plastic. It is a flash cure plastic so you have very little time to work with it before it flashes over.

This may be an issue when pouring a large pour like a bucket
 

WookieeGunner

Well-Known Member
I think his concern is how fast you can mix and pour. Task has a pot time of 6 minutes, so how much material can you:

1)Pour two parts together
2)Mix completely
3)Pour into a rotating cast

In 6 minutes? That would be how quickly it build up.

Just by glancing, Task 3 might be better. You get a 20 minute pot time with a 90 minute demold.
 

replicaprops

Official Licensee
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
What I was actually refering to is the fact that its a flash cure. The plastic goes thick in a blink of an eye compared to the slow steady thickening of a plastic like smooth-on smooth-cast series.

The cure of TASK locks the shape in in less that the time they state on the working time. Also the larger the volume the faster the cure.

In a situation like this I would say a slower cure is better for roto casting. The plastic has more time to find its place. Task however is still an excelent choice for durability.
 

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WookieeGunner

Well-Known Member
Well since you seem to have a working knowledge of the product, do you think a thin layer of Smooth-Cast for the details backed by TASK might work? Kind of like the gel coat before you start laying Fiber when you make a FiberGlass item?
 

Jedirick

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Originally posted by ~Sal~@Dec 27 2005, 07:02 PM
Speaking of smooth on, can anyone tell me on how fast their shipping usually is?
-thanks
[snapback]1144679[/snapback]​

They usually ship through the closest distributor to you that carries that product or product line. So I guess it depends on the particular distributor. I've been very fortunate and see most deliveries arrive within 3 biz days of placing original order.
 

replicaprops

Official Licensee
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
There is a problem I can see with mixing 2 different resins even if the first is cured. The resins all give off an oil and would act as a release agent. Although the shape may lock it in place, it may be brittle.
I suggest going with a slow cure TASK. Also are you machine roto casting or doing by hand rotation? By hand may not have enough g-force to get a good press up.
 

darienvader

Well-Known Member
Thanks all for the response; great input. I'm used to the Smooth-On 300 series which also has a short pot life, but for something as large as a helmet, I'll probably go with the TASK™ 3 based on the input given here. Thanks again.

–Jim
 

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vaderdarth

Master Member
I agree, bad idea to mix your resins. Casting resins won't stick to themselves so you basically have shell inside a shell but no bonding occurs. The other problem is that some products cause the second resin to cure improperly or fail to cure at all..........so be careful.

I'd search for a resin that has slower cure rate too.

Dave :)
 

TD-4242

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I've used Task 15 for helmets in the past. It is an excelent rotocasting resin as it slowly gels over starting about 6 minutes after mixing until about 12-15 minutes after mixing. This gives you plenty of time to poor in and start turning it.

It cures to a very strong slightly flexible finish that my only, accedental, strenth test is it can be knocked from a table and hit concrete without any noticable damage what so ever.

Only problem I've noticed is that it claims demold time of 1 hour but I always give it at least 3-4 hours otherwise it is still a little bit flexable and hasn't 100% cured.
 

Fetthunter

Sr Member
Originally posted by Jedirick+Dec 27 2005, 08:09 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Jedirick @ Dec 27 2005, 08:09 PM)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-~Sal~
@Dec 27 2005, 07:02 PM
Speaking of smooth on, can anyone tell me on how fast their shipping usually is?
-thanks
[snapback]1144679[/snapback]​

They usually ship through the closest distributor to you that carries that product or product line. So I guess it depends on the particular distributor. I've been very fortunate and see most deliveries arrive within 3 biz days of placing original order.
[snapback]1144720[/snapback]​
[/b]

I've been using Smooth-On's products for 4 years now. They make some great stuff. Seems like it takes 2 days to process my order and 3-4 days to ship it to me. Sometimes if I order it on a Saturday or Sunday I can get it on Friday. I've got an order of Smooth-Cast 305 on the way to me right now, in fact.
 
Hey folks,

Please tell me you're all taking the proper health precauions when working with urethanes.

If you don't know what they are, I'll be happy to send you the patented "Gordon Rant" about their use under proper conditions.

You all sound like you know what you're doing, but for those newbies who might not...

-Gordon (helping you all NOT to get TOXED OUT) ; )
 

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clonesix

Sr Member
Originally posted by SiR-ROUND@Jan 30 2006, 10:02 PM
Can someone explain what a rotating cast is?

Thnx.
[snapback]1172033[/snapback]​

Rotational casting, ie: roto-casting refers to rotating the mold (either by hand or machine) while the material (in this case: resin) cures. This leaves hollow shell rather than a solid block.

In the example described above, resin is mixed and poured into a mold. The mold is rotated by hand while the resin cures, thus coating all the sides. The resin will thicken as it cures and stick to the sides of the mold without running off. When there is a nice even coat on all the interior walls of the mold, the resin will kick off and solidify. After a few hours, the resin has cured and you can remove the piece. If done right, you have a hollow shell for a helmet. If done wrong, you will have real thin areas and big blobs in others.

This is how I make my helmets. I use 1000 grams of 3 minute kick resin. This works great, but not in summer when the ambient temperature kicks the resin too fast.
 

thedap

New Member
think chocolate easter bunny.

you think its a nice solid piece of chocolate when you look at it.

once you sink your teeth into it , its hollow.

the cheap buggers.
 

philippes

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I live in the Washington, DC area (Smooth-On is in Pennsylvania). I order on Monday and get my products on Tuesday or Wednesday. It's the fastest service I've ever had. Well, them and ULine (www.uline.com) for purchasing shipping boxes.

Be careful with Smooth-On Crystal Clear. I'm sensitized to it and get a violent skin rash if I touch it. I cover my skin and use a respirator when employing this material. (It's generally recommended that you do this with all urethanes.)

Phil
 

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