Lessons in Cosplay

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dak903

New Member
Hi everyone.

I write for GeekMom.com and I'm working on a post about lessons I've learned while building / wearing my costumes. I was wondering if anyone would like to share their own lessons and if you don't mind, include them in my post (with credit to you).

I'm working on my fifth costume now and I've learned a lot from all my builds.
 

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mdb

Sr Member
I've learnt limits are meant to be broken :) I mean it was something drummed in to us as performing art students to figure out what our real limits were vs the ones we impose on ourselves- and others- but performing relies so much on a team of people that it's hard to really practice and push yourself without that. I mean you can do it, but I've been much freer to push my limits with costuming as it requires no mirror for all the really embarrassing frustrating aspects that you never want to remember ;) And performing and costuming really do require a lot of self scrutiny.

So yeah, asking myself what is fun for me, and asking what else there is that I can try.

http://www.arrayedindreams,com that shows the range of eras and genres this approach has lead to :) Love cosplay as well as nerding out about historic engineering solutions to the classic "how do we make fabric fit the human form but let it move."

And hi :) I am certain I had a hunt around the site for the D23 Maleficent sneak peak info :) Possibly the social media accounts too :)
 

kialna

Sr Member
I've learnt to prepare things beforehand and test out new materials on small bits, before wasting it. I've also learnt that patience is necessary!
 

tjbro13

New Member
Cosplay taught me how crazy important dedication is to art/craft projects. Yeah, you can have a damn good idea and be able to execute it without burning your wallet, but it takes TIME. Absurd amounts of it. Either that, or you sacrifice the detail or a couple hundred dollars.
 

infymys

Sr Member
Whenever I make a cosplay, I think of several factors. Reference photos and a lot of research on how I would go about putting it together. I have to do my due diligence before I can start crafting. Is it within my skill level and my budget? I don't mind pushing the envelope slightly and testing my limits but I won't go overboard and get in over my head. Also, mobility is a big one. Can I walk around without difficulty, up and down stairs, through doorways, sit down comfortably, etc. I also factor in when making a cosplay is if I can get into and remove it without any extra hands from friends. And last but definitely not least, can I use the restroom without having to remove a part of the cosplay.
 

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Alpha Proto

Sr Member
Having a 10 foot tall Optimus Prime costume may sound like a good idea, but where are you going to put it?
Don't build a big costume unless you have a place to store it. Otherwise it will become a eye sore, and clutter your home.
Make sure it breaks down into smaller parts you can keep in storage boxes.
You may want to stick with a costume you can place on a clothes hanger. It will save you the space.
 

division 6

Master Member
While I'm a costumer not a cosplayer, here's some things. (Costumers are far more professional about public appearances)

Always have a repair kit handy.
Sharpies, CA (super glue), Safety Pins, Duct or Gaffers tape, high-bond double stick tape, Sewing kit and multi tool or Swiss army knife fix most problems.

Small first aid kit (accidents do happen)

If you have a costume that is bulky or with low visibility make sure to have handlers near by.

The general public is ignorant and will hit and pull on your costume. (injuring you and possibly damaging your costume and accessories)

Have a thick skin, people will talk crap and try to taunt you.
You will also find many are clueless and will ask stupid questions like are you a terrorist.

No real fire arms and preferably no real edged weapons (knives, swords, etc) you may find yourself escorted out of the event or worst).
Make sure your gear is "peace bonded" ie bright green zip ties on the triggers and zip ties holding knives in scabbards.

Be professional and polite at all times while in view of the public.

Enjoy yourself...
 
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Shanola

New Member
Mock-Ups Are Your Friend. This is the most valuable lesson I have learned about costuming. I am lucky to live close to Yates Bleachery (http://www.yatesbleachery.info) and can purchase cheap muslin by the roll (think 25yards for $10-20 or so). Mock-ups allow me to alter my pattern accordingly so when I cut my 'real' fabric, I don't waste it.
 

kNightwing

New Member
When building- if you get frustrated something isn't working out quite right, step away from it and go do something else like go for a walk until your calm.
 

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