If a screen used prop is heavily repaired is it still screen used?

Prop Store
Hi just a question I've asked myself and not that sure.
I have a dalek trooper helmet from doctor who that was screen used but I was given it's history. It was badly damaged and repair. Then a few years later it was dropped and the front was broken and repaired again. So is this still a screen used item? Or is it like triggers broom with 6 new heads and 4 new handles can I not really call it the same broom?
Be interested to see what you guys think.
 

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OldSkoolEffects

Well-Known Member
I think it depends on the circumstance. If no original parts remain, then no, it's not screen-used. But if new parts are made to complete something and are pretty spot on to the originals, and the majority of the piece is still the screen-used bit, I'd still say the label "screen-used" applies, but it's probably extremely subjective.
 
Thanks for that . Some parts are original few parts are new and others are original but fiberglassed over.
Just wanted to see what other thought. Don't stop me loving the helmet.
 

propninja

Member
Interesting question. I agree with Oldskool, a lot depends on the circumstances, particularly the end game fate of the prop in question. I'm on both Ends of this question, I have props that i got from a propmaster snapped in half, and props that came out of the original molds and never assembled. Of the screen used props I have, I chose to leave them in the state they were in when I got them. I think they tell more of a story that way. I've also repaired some of those same props and sent them back to set in pristine condition Point is, I look at props differently than the average collector. To an industry professional, a screen used prop may be nothing more than industrial waste, something to be thrown away when no longer needed. To a Collector, it's gold to be treasured. I see props as cool tchotchkes to freak out my friends with. Having said all of that, wheather or not repairing or restoring a screen used prop effects it's status depends on whether you plan to sell it or keep it. I is indeed subjective.
 

OldSkoolEffects

Well-Known Member
You also have the issue where the original props in question may have been broken down and sold as lots where some parts may not be grouped correctly. It really would come down to the collector.
 

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Angelus Lupus

Sr Member
This exact debate came up in the Galileo Shuttlecraft restoration thread (and had strongly divided opinions IIRC). I guess it depends partly on how much of the item is still original, and partly on a semantic distinction between 'repair' and 'restoration'. Erring on the side of caution/full-disclosure, if it were a piece to be sold or displayed, I'd clearly label what work had been done to it, but I'd probably still call it original; and screen-used.
 

Saber Concepts

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I would say it could be still call screen used as long as you document every repair/restoration that has been made to it. Documentation is one of the most important parts for screen used props.
 
Thanks for that . Some parts are original few parts are new and others are original but fiberglassed over.
Just wanted to see what other thought. Don't stop me loving the helmet.
You just answered your own question with the above comment ;).

As long as their is one original component/part/material, the item can be still be identified as "screen used" if identified as such. Of course the amount of original versus replaced/restored determines the percentage of what exactly saw screen time.

All items should be described in an honest and accurate way. The amount of restoration and replacement has to be provided, as well as how it was determined the item was screen used to begin with.

Additionally, the percentage of original components/materials still present are part of assessing the items value, etc, which can be subjective based on each individuals opinions and observations.
 

ContinuityKing

New Member
Firstly, holy thread resurrection! :D

I'm kinda in a similar predicament; a prop that was damaged during production (Screen used - you see it getting damaged in the movie but the damage in the movie appears lesser than the damage to the prop. The damage on prop appears more pronounced and doesn't correlate with the physical manipulation onscreen if that makes sense :unsure:). but anyway, not all pieces of the prop are there.

So do I find the missing bits to make it complete (It's quite a generic item) or do I leave as is? Obviously adding new bits will contradict the COA that accompanies the prop because the prop's appearance will be changed. But like Angelus Lupus says, labeling and showing which bits have changed, and what is still original is probably the best option.

I guess ultimately for me it depends on whether the changes are irreversible or not, I wouldn't wanna ruin an original prop just because I'm anal about it 'not being quite right' .
 
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AvZ

Member
Could you be a bit more specific what the piece is, what the damage is and what you want to add? That would help us a lot to form an opinion.
 

AvZ

Member
Just an old cell phone, missing bits of the shell/case at back inc battery etc.
I see no problem in adding those. It sounds it is reversible. If you ever sell it you can get it back to original condition. Maybe you can spray the replaced pieces in a different colour or maybe they are available in a different colour.
 

benhs1898

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I’m a fan of the concept of original source. Whether it’s a found item or made by the same maker/tailor. If too much is replaced I might still consider it original source. Again, your feeling toward it’s heritage is super subjective.
Kind of like antiques, repairs to an original add to the provenance but never remove the fact that it was, in some form, used on screen.
 

Mangalore

Well-Known Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Props are going older and some of them needs care.
Nothing except things made of metallics stays in form after years.
Many needs care after some time but how much care is up to the owner.
Latex Foam items e.g. can be stabilized but the detoration process will go on until it fall to crumbs (whenever that will be..) ....
 

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PrinceZip

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The way I see it; if a screen used prop is heavily modified, it's still technically a screen used prop as long as more than 50% of the original material remains. (50% is just an arbitrary number on top of my head)

That said, the question of screen accuracy is another issue.
 

BTTFSpencer

Sr Member
It is what it is.

A percentage replica and a percentage authentic. I've read many times that it's best not to modify screen used props and I agree in most circumstances.
 

ContinuityKing

New Member
I’m a fan of the concept of original source. Whether it’s a found item or made by the same maker/tailor. If too much is replaced I might still consider it original source. Again, your feeling toward it’s heritage is super subjective.
Kind of like antiques, repairs to an original add to the provenance but never remove the fact that it was, in some form, used on screen.
yeah I'm a fan of original source too (My OCD demands it) but unfortunately my OCD also demands something to be as complete as possible, I'm always pulled between the two lol. AvZ made a good point on whether repairing/adding to a screed used prop is reversible, if it reversible then that is the best case scenario bar finding a complete screen used prob in good condition. Also, as Mangalore said, depends on the material - latex foams will deteriorate eventually anyway. In summary (For me at least) I'd use reversible changes to plastic and/or metal props, but probably leave all latex foam props as is and focus on trying to stabilize what's left.
 

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