I Got A New 3D Printer Thread

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Motuxmen

New Member
So im looking at picking up a new 3d printer myself. would prefer to stay 1k or under. im not the most skilled person(understatement) so id like something thats easy to use and has good software with a large build size. probably asking for the moon im sure. But on top of modeling and cosplay stuff i would like to be able to print items for my dog mushing hobby as well. any advice or tips?
 

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JiminSTLouis

Sr Member
I have an Ender 3 with the Ender Xtender kit. I’m currently working on a 4 foot Jupiter 2 with it.
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Supe

New Member
So im looking at picking up a new 3d printer myself. would prefer to stay 1k or under. im not the most skilled person(understatement) so id like something thats easy to use and has good software with a large build size. probably asking for the moon im sure. But on top of modeling and cosplay stuff i would like to be able to print items for my dog mushing hobby as well. any advice or tips?
Maybe take a look at the Ender 5 Plus or CR-10. The former is a better machine out of the box, the latter is huge if you have a real need for large one piece prints. For cosplay stuff, the Ender 5 Plus can do flexible filaments out of the box, whereas the the CR-10 would need an extruder upgrade. Both are served well with additional mods/upgrades. Really just comes down to priorities. Just make sure you have the room to put them, especially if you consider wanting to build an enclosure for ABS prints, etc.
 

DazzlerFan

Well-Known Member
Work has been keeping me very busy of late, so not a lot of time to think about Printing.

I reprinted the Bladerunner blaster successfully (glue stick, 65 temp bed, 205 temp extruder). Issue was I printed the three pieces at once and thought that I had resized all three pieces in Creality Slicer. Nope - discovered that only the barrel was 90%. Everything else was 100%.

So I reprinted just the barrel at 100% to have one massively oversized gun. Lol. I’ll reprint the 90% pieces at another time.

My eight year old son modeled in Tinkercad a small space diorama and we printed it.

I’ve also been printing eye glasses holders for my wife.

Question - I only have the nozzles that came with my CR-10. They aren’t marked, but I read that they are .4. I’ve read for larger Henley prints that .8 is the way to go. Are there other sizes that are useful? I figure if I’m going to put in an order I might as well get a selection.

I really need to get into the sanding business and get some of these smooth. I’ve mostly just been trying to learn the machine. It still feels slightly mysterious. :)

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Starbase101

Well-Known Member
The larger the nozzle diameter, the more filament will come out so sizes above 0.4 are usually for "fast" prints or significantly larger items where geometry precision isn't as important. (You won't get as "crisp" corners with a larger nozzle, and print lines will be more noticeable. Think of it like drawing with a fat highlighter marker versus a fine-tip Sharpie - the finer tip will be capable of higher detail within the same square area.) Smaller diameters like 0.3 or 0.25 allow for finer precision and higher detail, but have the penalty of longer print times and fussier settings.
 

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DazzlerFan

Well-Known Member
That makes sense. I like the finer detail so I’ll get some smaller nozzles I’m fine with slower prints. Thanks for the input.
 

Starbase101

Well-Known Member
I don't mind longer print times either, especially when I get a higher-detailed part needing less cleanup as a result. I just let it run through the night and I'll work on other things while it's chugging away during the day. What blows is checking a print in the morning and seeing a pile of "spaghetti" from a failed print, or getting a brownout/blackout (power bump) 50+ hours into a print. Each time that happens I vow again to buy an uninterrupted power supply (which I haven't yet - they're pricey for a good one). It wouldn't help for prints that have just started, but you're not out much with those anyway. Where it would be helpful is when a print has been running for days and only has about a half hour left to go and the power goes out - a good power supply would enable the print to complete.
 

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