Human Centipede 3

Solo4114

Master Member
I read the synopses of the three films on Wikipedia, and I have to say, I really do not get the appeal of these films. Like, they go beyond the whole grindhouse thing and into a whole other realm that's just supremely ****ed up. I mean, I get that they're only movies, but they really just seem like excuses to show the most gruesome, depraved crap for its own sake. It's truly torture porn.
 

cayman shen

Master Member
It's kind of like riding the biggest roller coaster at the amusement park. You get through a disturbing movie, you have bragging rights. The pejorative "torture porn" can be replaced with the more neutral "body horror" if you need to dress it up, I suppose. And I don't see why body horror isn't a legitimate sub-genre. To watch something that makes your skin crawl, that you have to force yourself not to look away from, and get through it...there's a certain catharsis in that (again, if I need to dress it up with fancy language :lol)

And in defense of "torture porn": I get that really gnarly exploitive violence isn't everyone's cup of tea. But I think many of the biggest horror fans might deep down be the most sensitive people. Like poking a tooth socket with your tongue, you prod at the thing that bothers you until it's no longer upsetting. You give yourself immunity from being disturbed by the world's depravity by facing it full on, becoming desensitized, and eventually being able to even laugh at it. Or perhaps they're overly intelligent people whose cynicism has made them nihilistic? And the best balm for existential despair is certainly laughter, followed perhaps by stoicism. I think it's only a very, very small percentage of fans who are themselves sociopathic, or psychotic, or depraved in whatever way causes them to lack empathy.

I know that's kind of thin armchair psychology, but in the movie's defense, I don't believe that the people who are drawn to the sickest entertainment are always sick people, and I believe degenerate works of art have a very important place in society.

So yeah, I'll be watching this :lol
 
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Solo4114

Master Member
To be clear, I'm not saying people who watch this stuff are necessarily sick. I see a place in the world for disturbing, upsetting imagery as a means of confronting -- in an "it's only a movie" way -- the kind of horrors that exist in the real world. Some folks are more willing to do that than others. It just sounds to me like the whole thing is so gruesome as to be basically intolerable (especially some of the stuff in the 2nd film, from the sound of it). If you get your kicks this way, go for it. I mean, fortunately, it only IS a movie, but I dunno. From the sound of it, this series has a quality of...hmm....cruelty to it that I don't find in a lot of other horror films.

And to be honest, a lot of my enjoyment of horror nowadays is more the delightfully cheesy horror of the 80s. But hey, who knows. In 30 years, maybe folks will look back on the Human Centipede series and laugh at how awful the f/x are or whatever.
 

dascoyne

Master Member
The funny thing is that explicit and excessive gore in movies never used to bother me until I became a doctor.
The real irony is that I can handle the stuff in real life (I've done autopsies on fresh bodies as part of my training and used to harvest human organs (kidneys, livers, hearts) for transplant, as well as disfiguring injuries e.g. Fixing a guy who unsuccessfully tried to cut his own throat). But it's hard for me to watch gratuitous movie gore.

I won't be watching this. (Also because the physiologic rationale makes no sense to me.)
 

George

Sr Member
After reading the comments,I'm thankfull the link didn't open because it's rated 18+.
Desensitising oneself in order to adapt to or survive the horrors of this world seems to me like reversed evolution and is actually closer to sadism than sanity,and sadism isn't healthy for anyone.It's like a bad adrenaline rush that will result in perpetually redefining the boundries of what is acceptable until you yourself don't know anymore.
If anything,this world needs more compassion than cruelty.
 

Jeyl

Master Member
Damien and Ralph sleep butt to face.... butt to face... butt to face...
 
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cayman shen

Master Member
To be clear, I'm not saying people who watch this stuff are necessarily sick. I see a place in the world for disturbing, upsetting imagery as a means of confronting -- in an "it's only a movie" way -- the kind of horrors that exist in the real world. Some folks are more willing to do that than others. It just sounds to me like the whole thing is so gruesome as to be basically intolerable (especially some of the stuff in the 2nd film, from the sound of it). If you get your kicks this way, go for it. I mean, fortunately, it only IS a movie, but I dunno. From the sound of it, this series has a quality of...hmm....cruelty to it that I don't find in a lot of other horror films.

And to be honest, a lot of my enjoyment of horror nowadays is more the delightfully cheesy horror of the 80s. But hey, who knows. In 30 years, maybe folks will look back on the Human Centipede series and laugh at how awful the f/x are or whatever.
I will admit there was one scene in the sequel that crossed the line even by my extremely loose standards. I do hear what you're saying. And yes, I think in 30 years this WILL be considered harmless, just like parents who freaked about Ozzy in the 80s or Marilyn Manson in the 90s didn't realize time would date them and make them seem foolish and fundamentally harmless, and make the parents look a bit hysterical for being so concerned. Just as we can see Ozzy as kind of cartoonish, so are these movies, believe me. Not that they aren't cruel, but the filmmakers' tongues are firmly placed in their cheeks. Not that I'm trying to talk anyone into watching them or anything, but those who do will see there's definitely a lot of nodding and winking going on.
 
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cayman shen

Master Member
After reading the comments,I'm thankfull the link didn't open because it's rated 18+.
Desensitising oneself in order to adapt to or survive the horrors of this world seems to me like reversed evolution and is actually closer to sadism than sanity,and sadism isn't healthy for anyone.It's like a bad adrenaline rush that will result in perpetually redefining the boundries of what is acceptable until you yourself don't know anymore.
If anything,this world needs more compassion than cruelty.
I think turning a blind eye to horror can be a form of cruelty, in that denying horrible things gives them power, and that not facing horror is denying yourself an opportunity to grow stronger, which invites further cruelty. But that's obviously a value judgment, bordering on forum-forbidden religious convo, and beyond the scope of this movie--besides, as interesting as that all is to me, I don't want to give the impression that I'm taking this TOO seriously. The whole "poop in the mouth" thing gives me an adolescent, Beavis and Butthead rebellious little thrill of subversive glee :lol
 
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YenChih Lin

Sr Member
For me it's an educated guess, since I am no psychologist, but it surely has to do with the "flight or fight" instinct of man. Despite the real horrors like war and natural disasters and accidents; when in our everyday life have we do deal with such primal emotions like fear, disgust and shocked feelings? Just barely now. It stimulates our both Amygdalae in the brain, which is responsible for fear reaction - imagine back when you were a small child or toddler: Your parents had thrown you a few feet up in the sky and you were afraid, but when your parents catches you, you started laughing and smiling. Or being on a rollercoaster as mentioned, the adrenalin kick boosts also your endorphins after the ride, since you know it's over and it wasn't so terrifying. We humans have a brain made for the stone-age - how primitive…
 
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