How do I scale something down?

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by TFrosst, Jun 2, 2006.

  1. TFrosst

    TFrosst Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I have something that I need in a smaller size. How cna I scale somethign down to the size I need it? It's nothing too complex, jsut a flat piece with raised details. I know they have expanding resin, anything like shrinking resin?
     
  2. Too Much Garlic

    Too Much Garlic Master Member

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    <div class='quotetop'>(TFrosst @ Jun 2 2006, 10:06 PM) [snapback]1255045[/snapback]</div>
    This thread might help. It seems to me you are asking the same this guy was:
    http://www.rpf.invisionzone.com/index.php?showtopic=111218
     
  3. TFrosst

    TFrosst Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Oh man, how'd I miss that. Thanks a lot.
     
  4. RedTwoX

    RedTwoX Sr Member

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    I'm not sure how much you can control tha amount of shrinkage in a mold. I would simply place the master on a photocopier, hit the reduce button a couple of times, and use the reduced photocopy as a templatte to make a new piece. This allows you total control over the scaling.
     
  5. Fetthunter

    Fetthunter Sr Member

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    <div class='quotetop'>(RedTwoX @ Jun 2 2006, 03:58 PM) [snapback]1255081[/snapback]</div>
    Or take a picture of it and pull it up in Photoshop or Illustrator, both of which have graduated scales. I'm usually scaling up, but it works the same both ways.


    You can also cross multiply and divide:

    Say you've got a 4" action figure with a 1" blaster, and you're wondering how big the blaster would be in "real life".
    You set the "real life" size for the action figure (we'll say 6 feet tall, for example), and then you go to work:

    4" 1"
    --*--
    6' X


    You cross multiply and divide to solve for "X" (the "real life" size of the blaster). 6x1=6 / 4 = 1.5 (feet) or 18"

    You can also convert everything to inches first to make it easier:

    4" 1"
    -- * --
    72" X

    72x1=72 / 4 = 18" (same result as before)

    So your 4" action figure with a 1" blaster would be 6' tall with a 18" blaster in "real life". :D

    This also works for scaling DOWN:

    Say you're making a replica action figure of yourself, and you're 6' tall in real life and want to be a 4" tall action figure. Your real life blaster is 18" long, and you need to know how big to make the miniature version:

    6' 18"
    --*--
    4" X


    4x18=72 / 6 = 1 So your answer is 1" (same value as in the first example, we just reversed the process to solve for it).

    It's all about ratios. Now aren't you glad that I paid attention in math class in high school that day 15 + years ago?? :lol

    Enjoy.


    J
     
  6. RedTwoX

    RedTwoX Sr Member

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    <div class='quotetop'>(Fetthunter @ Jun 2 2006, 04:44 PM) [snapback]1255111[/snapback]</div>
    Actually, that's what I usually do too. However, if you have a compilcated pattern or complex curves, a photocopied temple is a fast solution.
     
  7. TFrosst

    TFrosst Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    If I add acetone to resin, will it shrink as the acetone in the resin evaporates? Can I do this with silicone?
     
  8. boatbuilder1

    boatbuilder1 Well-Known Member

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    this is easyer and faster download it and keep it on your desk top

    scalemaster

    http://www.starshipmodeler.com/tech/scalemaster.htm


    charlie

    <div class='quotetop'>(TFrosst @ Jun 3 2006, 01:00 PM) [snapback]1255378[/snapback]</div>
    acetone will work with resin but experiment first with small batches. it really works good with GRP resins I have not tried it with ploy resins. it works great with epoxies as well it helps dry faster it dies not work with RTV IMHO

    charlie
     

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