How come everyone else can do this stuff properly, but I can't?

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Elkman

New Member
Let me just start out by saying that what I've done here is inexcusable. Why in the hell do I have any excuse for the silicone dripping right off the sculpture like this?
Mempo-33r.jpg


I really shouldn't be trying to use brush-on silicone on a sculpt if all of the silicone is just going to drip off, right? Do I even have any business trying to mold and cast stuff if I'm going to let all of the silicone drip off and form a puddle where it's just completely useless?

This, of course, happened after I had to revise the sculpt pretty significantly because I didn't notice that the base I was sculpting on was tilted just a little bit to the side. I didn't pay attention to that, or to the fact that I got the centerline wrong.

Oh, and if anyone tries to tell me that I'm being too hard on myself, that is NOT the answer to the question.
 

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ScottAS

New Member
1st off you aren't superior enuff to do this work J/K You should have seen my 1st attempt! Regular silicone has to be poured into a mold box and set up is around 8hrs. Silicone can be made thicker so you can brush it on (brushable silicone). Here is a video to help you understand,http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASAXH6L4JVg. It takes trial and error with a lot of research and you will be slinging silicone in no time.
 

Skullsplitter

New Member
Don't sweat it kid, the magic word here is layer upon layer upon layer for the basecoat, adding thickness when it get's tacky but not dry. After a few first coats you can use a silicone with a little more body to make sure the mold is thick enough.

Look at Hez's tutorials for a nicely illustrated guide
 

MEANGENE83

Sr Member
ScottAS is right. You shouldn't be molding! (kidding)

Trial and error. Let the silicone that is on it dry. Then do a second coat, this time purchase some Silicone Thixatropic (thickener). Contact a local supplier and explain you need if to stick to vertical surfaces.

I recently used Mold Max Stroke ( mold max 30) on my Zpred head sculpture.

Even tho it was made for vertical surfaces it still dripped off, I used some thickener after my "detail" coat has captured all the fine detail.( which you gave already done )
After the detail coat sets, mix up a batch like peanut butter consistency and stiple it onto the sculpt.

I recommend thickening certain areas of the sculpt that may be prone to tearing,


Also very important. Make sure you fill in any UNDERCUTS before you make your mothermold. Undercuts=mechanical lock=casting won't remove from mold=total epic fail.

Goodluck!
Ask questions. Take the frustration and turn it into motivation to overcome inexperience.
 

MEANGENE83

Sr Member
One last thing. Visit smoothon.com

If for nothing else watch the tutorial they put up. Lots if video and pictured tutorials.

Huge database of knowledge!!!!!!
 

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MEANGENE83

Sr Member
Here we go again... Another addendum.

Take the silicone that has cured on the table. Run it thru a sausage grinder into fine particles and reuse it as filler for the next batch of silicone. Silicone is expensive and should not be wasted.

Silicone bonds to silicone and to nothing else remember those words.
 

MEANGENE83

Sr Member
Haha. I call my girlfriend "ye ole sausage grinder"

Haha, I don't think that's the formal name but it's the hand crank thing you feed meat into and out the bottom it comes out like hamburger...

I have seen em in hardware stores, also in bed bath and beyond.

It's Definitly a cooking tool as well as a good fushing chum line maker.
 

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