Hot glue sticks alternative for plasti-dip

Discussion in 'Replica Costumes' started by GlennTech, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I live in a country without plasti-dip... But with much glue sticks :D. Since I'm finishing my mark VI Iron Man I needed plasti dip. Tried PVA-glue but I could peel it off my foam.

    I spilled MUCH glue on my foam in a reflex I grab a piece of crap foam and spread the glue.

    It dried...

    I was in big worries that my piece would be f*cked up. But NO it wasn't screwed!!!

    It was strong, flexible, and paint-able (have to try the last one).

    Going to experiment on that a bit more...
     
  2. German

    German New Member

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    Definitely works. They have been using it as an alternative to resin for pepakura over at the 405th for a while. You can make big batches up of it with a pan(not used for food) on the stove or a portable heating element. I know I have seen little, dedicated pots for melting hot glue sticks for floral stuff at Michael's.

    I think the biggest issue with using it on foam is getting an even coverage. Hot glue will run but it still cools pretty quickly. The glue could also heat the foam up too much and cause the foam to want to flatten or sag if you were adding it to a curved surface.
     
  3. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I've to look further to achieve an even coverage. It's pretty even coverage but with a few 'faults'. Maybe look for a good spreading tool or maybe a chemical product which modifies the surface of the glue a bit.
     
  4. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    Mistake
     
  5. Pete SSS

    Pete SSS Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Once the hot glue has cooled on the surface of the foam, you could try gently heating it up again with a heatgun to smooth out the surface? JUst an idea, but be careful not to melt your foam!
     
  6. Cal

    Cal Well-Known Member

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    Anyone ever tried Resin on foam. I was wondering if it spiderwebed, if it got hit.
     
  7. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I have bought a heatgun, my hair dryer couldn't meet my standards any more. I'll post in a few hours some pictures of the process. Hope it works.
     
  8. Bizarro Lois

    Bizarro Lois Sr Member

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    Do you mean the sticks that you buy for a hot glue gun or the little push-up sticks of glue you use in schools?
     
  9. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    hot glue gun.
     
  10. Egon Spengler

    Egon Spengler Sr Member

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    I wouldn't do it. When that stuff gets hot again, it gets sticky all over again.
     
  11. kialna

    kialna Sr Member

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    What IS plasti-dip actually?
     
  12. EyeofSauron

    EyeofSauron Master Member

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    well, it says liquid rubber on the can, i think that describes it pretty well :)
     
  13. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I live in Belgium, Belgium is known for its 'cold' climate. But I understand what you mean. When in a crowded room or a hot room. But some paints gets also a bit sticky when it's hot. So I won't consider that as a problem. You just have to cool down some time :D.
     
  14. DirtyBrit

    DirtyBrit New Member

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    I have a couple of cans of Plasti dip for my foam iron man project but at $5 a can i see that becoming a little expensive, hot glue sticks are really cheap so if this works it may save me a few butt chewings from the wife! Once the sticks are melted could they be brushed on if you work quickly?
     
  15. Shades

    Shades Well-Known Member

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    I just got some cans at Home Depot... There is also a Rustoleum production "undercoat" that doesn't dry as quick but also works. I had to use it when there was a plasti dip shortage.

    I have tried the liquid plastic dip by painting it on. I thought it looked like junk. I was really unhappy with it. the spray gave a much better surface finish. I think you would have the same issue with hot glue. Fine as a reinforcement on the inside of armor, but for a paint able surface it will be too uneven and hold brush marks. I wish you luck, but I don't think this would work well.

    If I were you, I would order it from another country. I get stuff from hong kong all the time for projects. If you are going to put the time into a suit, it would not be worth cheaping out on the paint. I saw cans on amazon for 7 bucks. My warmachine used 3 cans. (you can even get red).

    Best,

    Keith
     
  16. Klwl

    Klwl Well-Known Member

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    I've used hot glue on my armor in a pinch but as soon as it heats up in sun or a lot of wear it became, well....unglued.

    I assume your coating this on the outside of your armor? You'd be wearing this outdoors and possibly in the sun? I don't use it a lot but wouldn't it be similar even when painted?
     
  17. Guri

    Guri Sr Member

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    Very creative solution! Happy accident...

    I'd be nervous about the heat factor too. While hot glue does need to be heated pretty hot to melt completely, it wouldn't hurt to do a bit of testing to see how hot it needs to be to get it sticky. And how cold makes it brittle... just so you'll know when traveling and wanting to leave it in your car or take it on a plane where it will go with you or in your luggage.

    Well, only if you're putting a lot of time into it... and want it to last. I have craft foam pieces that unexpectedly cracked after being painted because of cold weather.
     
  18. STEALTH

    STEALTH Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    When I started to first hot glue foam pieces together from my first foam project last year I mulled the idea of using hot glue from when I had run off that smoothed down onto my white ranger shield. I later opted out as for how tedius and messy a process it would've been.
    Too many variables to consider to really get a smooth finish.

    I don't see the problem with just using a glue type material that turns clear. It's rather inexpensive. Probably less than wasting a lot of hot glue sticks. I spent $15 dollars sealing my suit in time for halloween and it still looks good enough to me. You're never gonna get the paint 100% crack proof unless you get some kind of specific flexible paint made to flex.

    The paint will flex beyond the natural curve but will leave lines when you flex it opoosite to the natural curve/shape of the part. Foam costumes aren't really props. They're for cosplay so they're not going to be flawless.
     
  19. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I used PVA-glue but I could peel the glue off my foam... That doesn't seem right? My foam is just regular old camping mats.


    Anyone got a great, cheap, fast webshop for plasti-dip or anything else to seal my foam. If I paint directly onto it then it's also peel able and cracks very quick.
     
  20. STEALTH

    STEALTH Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Camping mats aren't the greatest choice for foam either. I built my mark III out of those. I much prefer the more dense anti-fatigue mats.
    I don't have the peeling problem. I did a lot in that suit on halloween.

    Plasti-dip is really expensive so I'm like you and try to find other ways around using that.
     
  21. GlennTech

    GlennTech Active Member

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    I'm building atm my biceps. These will be done in like a few hours and then tomorrow I'll try some techniques out with the glue sticks. So I know a bit the positive and negative points of glue sticks.
     
  22. STEALTH

    STEALTH Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yeah man. Give it a go.
     
  23. Hyperballistik

    Hyperballistik Member

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    If you need a cheap alternative to plasti dip, use flexible window caulking, I usually run my heat gun over the foam first to seal up as many open pores as I can then take the window caulking, make sure its flexible and paintable, dab it onto the foam, take a wet sponge and spread it around the foam, once it dries it ready for paint, also its good for sealing up the big gaps between pieces, dries smooth and i believe when you paint over it that it looks better than ones sealed with Plasti dip (not to mention its cheap) you don't have to run the heat gun over the foam, but it does look alot better if you do

    Im using this stuff called Alex Plus Door and Window caulking, stays Flexible,contains Latex and silicone, paintable when dry

    Good luck hope this helps some
     
  24. dabiddabird

    dabiddabird Well-Known Member

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    I'm testing out shoe goo at the moment. So far its pretty good but it is difficult to get on smoothly. You can get a pretty good smooth surface on small areas but when trying to cover a large area it gets messy. It paints really well though. I'm trying out other things as well. And combinations of things. But the thing is that plasti dip gives you such a smooth surface that its hard to find something to match it.
     

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