Greek Helmet-- Questions?

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ecuddy

New Member
Hello all,

I am an artist, but have only recently gotten really into crafting my own designs on anything other than paper. I am currently working on a variation of the typical Greek Hoplite helmet, and wonder what the best (preferably fairly simple, it's my first helmet) way is to go about making it look really rather bomb. The base design is a Corinthian style helmet, and I have it molded out of sculptamold. My original intention was to do it Sculptamold, then sand the exterior, but that may be a bit too labour intensive and messy at the moment. I am really interested in the idea of using friendly plastic, or something quite a bit lighter and smoother than Sculptamold, and would love some input as to how I should proceed from here. I am particularly partial to the shape I have created with the Sculpta, and would love to figure out how I could use that as a cast.

Ideas? Thank you!

(It looks a bit wonky in the picture, as the surface and edges really need sanding, but the inside is pretty darn near perfect)

IMG_7956.jpg
 
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ecuddy

New Member
Bummer, I was kind of hoping to get some input on this before Halloween got really close. Anyone? ...Cricket...Cricket...Bueller...Bueller...
 

laxman09

Active Member
it seems like a pretty difficult situation, the best that i think i could advise you to do if you want to just work with what you have is to just keep shaping it, using either a sander to get it semi-close to what you want or using a grater tool and then fine-tune sanding to get it to exactly where you want it. i've never used sculptamold, how hard is the surface? sometimes you just gotta get dirty!

how strong is this stuff by the way?

also, is it possible to smooth it out before it cures, leaving you with a smooth surface? because if that's the case then you could even just recast the helmet and smooth the surface before it cures and then your work time would be cut in half (no pun intended, seeing as though you've got half a helmet there (;). the shape looks good though, im sure you've got the talent to recreate it!

i'll try and help where i can, i hope at least some of this was helpful!
 

ecuddy

New Member
Scultamold is pretty fun considering it's a mix between plaster and papier machee, but it's nice and solid and totally sanding friendly. I sanded it down quite a bit yesterday, and it looks a lot happier now. Yes, I only have the half at the moment, the plan is to make the other half separately so I can stick them together at the crown under a crest.

I'm not sure how well I can smooth it out before it cures, it comes quite lumpy in the package and sort of remains that way when moulding.
I'm just wondering now if it would be easier to mould some friendly plastic instead? I've never used the stuff, but it looks cool.
 

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laxman09

Active Member
i'd say just keep sanding, now that i see it better, it looks like if you sand it down just the right amount you could get a really nice weathered looking metal texture, like a greek helmet you'd see in the museum! im not sure what product you are looking at exactly, but it seems from what i saw on google to be a thermoplastic. when you made this helmet, what did you cast it from? because if you just built it up around a head form then thermoplastics may not be a good option, mainly because they need heat to be malleable and arent much of something that you could easily sculpt, especially in the window of time before the plastic solidifies!
 

trackboy186

Active Member
I'd have to agree. More sanding seems the best way to go looking at your new pictures. It looks like it is almost there.
 

laxman09

Active Member
Yes, I just sculpted it on a head form from scratch.
I guess this is the stuff I was looking at. http://www.amazon.com/AMACO-Friendly-Plastic-Pellets-4-4-Ounce/dp/B0026HWG16#
The ing is, I love the weathered-museum look, but I would also love to have a smooth, polished metal look. So is there any material that cast inside the shell of what I have?
hmm... well apparently all you need if hot water, so maybe it wouldnt be too hot to work with, you'd need to build it up somehow though, i'd imagine that even though its malleable after influence from hot water it may tend to sag or "melt" down if built up too thick. its cheap enough if you wanted to get some and test it out, you may even prove my suspicion wrong! but i'd suggest just working on the form you currently have, probably the fastest way to get to finish.

to get the smooth polished look you'll need to sand it progressively with more fine grit, working from say 180 to 400 (600 or1000 if you're picky) and then probably spraying it with a few layers of primer or some clear coat to seal the surface, since the surface might be porous (because of the material, plaster/paper mache). after that, its all about the paint job to get it to look like its really metal. there are some different ways to go about it, im not an expert in making materials truly look metal but there are members on here that do a great job and may be able to lend a hand!
 

ecuddy

New Member
Okay! I just finished the other half of the scultamold sculpture! IMG_8204.jpg IMG_8205.jpg

I may not be able to get it off of the mould, but if that is the car, I have a sawzall! I want to add a crest as well, so any line down the middle shouldn't be too much of a problem.
Have either of you ever do a horse-hair style plumed crest on a helmet? I'm trying to think of what I might use, as I have heard that horse hair can be difficult to work with (plus, I'm a horseback-rider, I KNOW that it's tough to work with when it's still on the horse.)

Any suggestions? I want it to actually look decent, so preferably no broom heads.

Still may consider experimenting with that plastic stuff later, though.
 

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