Graflex prevent rust

Wells

Well-Known Member
I have a vintage Graflex landing this week and I want to prevent it rusting.

I'm in the UK so there will at some point be damp around.

Any recommendations to minimise the risk? I'm thinking sticking those humidity packs for cigars in its storage box?


Humi-Smart 2-Way Control 62% RH 4g 20-Pack https://amzn.eu/d/eJYWXl1
 

v312

Sr Member
I've seen Renaissance wax being recommended somewhere in the forum, but can't speak from personal experience. Apparently it was developed exactly for artifact preservation by the British museum
 

CWOODREPLICAS

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I have a vintage Graflex landing this week and I want to prevent it rusting.

I'm in the UK so there will at some point be damp around.

Any recommendations to minimise the risk? I'm thinking sticking those humidity packs for cigars in its storage box?


Humi-Smart 2-Way Control 62% RH 4g 20-Pack https://amzn.eu/d/eJYWXl1
I've never needed to prevent my graflex from rusting. You just need to keep it clean and in a dry place.- The plating will keep it from rusting badly. You can stick some of those silica gels in the body but I don't think it'll do too much.

Renaissance wax is good but leaves a residue.
 

eethan

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
only the clamp can rust if I'm not mistaken. it is plasted steel. if it is not damaged, it will not rust because of the plating.
the rest is plated brass, it can develop rust by contact with heavily rusted other parts I guess, but again, if not damaged, and kept in a normalish room, it will just be fine for years to come.
remember that those already more than 50 years old, if the one you got looks fine, there are very good chances that it will stay fine for many more years :)
congrats on your aquisition :)
 

Wells

Well-Known Member
only the clamp can rust if I'm not mistaken. it is plasted steel. if it is not damaged, it will not rust because of the plating.
the rest is plated brass, it can develop rust by contact with heavily rusted other parts I guess, but again, if not damaged, and kept in a normalish room, it will just be fine for years to come.
remember that those already more than 50 years old, if the one you got looks fine, there are very good chances that it will stay fine for many more years :)
congrats on your aquisition :)
Ah good stuff. I'll stick some of the small silicone damp absorbers in the bottom of the box just in case, but yeah otherwise I got super lucky and its mint. :)
 

Praxis Visuals

New Member
I recently just got my Graflex Inc. flash. It’s probably my prized peice. HOWEVER, the only issue with it is this: there is some mild-medium amount of battery acid at the bottom base/ cap of the handle. The corrosion from the acid as eaten away at some of the logo and the chrome plating has flaked off a good bit… what would y’all recommend for cleaning the remaining battery acid WITHOUT removing further amounts of the bottom chrome plating?
 

GreyGuard38

New Member
I think baking soda in water would work, or Coke soda. Those clean car battery contacts pretty well. Probably better wait for the experts to chime in, though.
 

thd9791

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I would first neutralize it a little with water and baking soda, just slosh it around in there

Coke will definitely remove rust but I’m not sure a more acidic environment will help. Alcohol (70%) is good for cleaning battery contacts after batteries leak so some of that may help too
 

AnubisGuard

Master Member
I think baking soda in water would work, or Coke soda. Those clean car battery contacts pretty well. Probably better wait for the experts to chime in, though.

Car batteries are lead-acid, while home batteries such as the D-cells that would have been in a Graflex are alkaline, so it needs to be cleaned off with an acid, not a base.

Try white vinegar on a Q tip. It should foam and sizzle on contact with the battery schmutz; just keep applying and scrubbing until the fizzing stops, then rinse with water. It's the best method for cleaning up after a battery leak I've found.
 

thd9791

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Car batteries are lead-acid, while home batteries such as the D-cells that would have been in a Graflex are alkaline, so it needs to be cleaned off with an acid, not a base.

Try white vinegar on a Q tip. It should foam and sizzle on contact with the battery schmutz; just keep applying and scrubbing until the fizzing stops, then rinse with water. It's the best method for cleaning up after a battery leak I've found.
This is the most fascinating and helpful post I’ve read on here in ages. Thank you! I learned something new today
 

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