Gluing With Little Surface Area

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by Jesuit24, Jul 19, 2015.

  1. Jesuit24

    Jesuit24 Active Member

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    I'm plotting a Tank Girl helmet like so:

    Hewl-Tanky.jpg

    And I was wondering what ideas people have for attaching the various projectiles to the helmet. I'm talking attaching as in unmovable and unbudging, so that they would last an entire convention unscathed. I'm a big fan of epoxy, but I don't think it would cut it in this case and my other go-to for permanent hold is fiberglass, but I don't see a way that would glue A to B. All I can think to do is drill holes in the helmet and try and wedge the pieces in tightly with some epoxy.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Sean

    Sean Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    are you talking about the arrow knife dart bullet head piece on front? whats the helmet made of? and the parts you want to put on?

    need a little more details...
     
  3. Jesuit24

    Jesuit24 Active Member

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    The helmet is a regular metal GI helmet and I'm thinking about attaching the bullet, dart, arrow and little star on the front, all of which will be metal as well.
     
  4. typeomega

    typeomega Member

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    i would drill and tap the objects being attached then drill corresponding holes in the helmet and mount them with hardware then use epoxy/bondo/milliput for insurance
     
  5. PoopaPapaPalps

    PoopaPapaPalps Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A mechanical bond is greater than any chemical bond. I would do something on the variation of drilling holes or notches into the helmet and then with your projectiles, drill holes into those, and using a board with pegs in it or screws, attach both object with the holes into the pegs/screws through the helmet and secure it with epoxy.
     
  6. typeomega

    typeomega Member

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    i love how the bullet on there still has the brass casing on it.
     
  7. USS Endeav

    USS Endeav Well-Known Member

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    This.

    As was said, a mechanical bond will surpass a chemical one.
     
  8. Sean

    Sean Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I agree. drill the helmet and objects. thread tap for screws. and If the helmet thick enough. counter sink the screw heads. drilling and tapping a knife blade could a pita. and could shatter it. and definitely some type of metal epoxy..
     
  9. PoopaPapaPalps

    PoopaPapaPalps Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I wasn't implying using a real blade, by the by. :lol You should stick to making a replica to use.
     
  10. typeomega

    typeomega Member

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    you may also want to make the kangaroo in front hollow so you can fill it with lead shot or something or you may have balance issues
     
  11. Sean

    Sean Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A plastic blade wouldn't last ten minutes mechanical or glued I would think.
     
  12. GaryArm

    GaryArm Member

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    I also agree that a mechanical fixing isfar more durable than relying on glue.
    If the props were shorter you could havegotten away with glue but the long items put extra stress on the point ofattachment

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 9, 2018
  13. Jesuit24

    Jesuit24 Active Member

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    From a practical standpoint, I'm thinking of getting rid of the knife entirely; there are too many opportunities for it to snap off or hit someone behind her and as said plastic would be prone to snapping and then a real metal one wouldn't ever be let into a con. The arrow, I'm thinking of snapping the shaft in half so there's a bit more clearance.

    But tapping sounds like a plan, so I'll go that route, thanks.

    I know. I feel like it's sacrilege to keep the casing, but I must for accuracy. :D
     
  14. Contec

    Contec Master Member

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    Maybe you could make a fake arrow from a metal pipe?
     
  15. typeomega

    typeomega Member

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    if yout going to cut down a arrow... modern arrows are pre taped for changeable arrow tips i would go to wallyworld and pick up a 3 pack of youth arrows. you could try and extract the arrow mounting insert in the front and then cut down the shaft but i think it would be easier to go the opposite way and cut off the the veins and move them as the knocks on most arrows are made to come off to be easily replaceable. or better yet see if you can find crossbow bolts instead as they are inherently shorter from the factory.
     
  16. Darth Lars

    Darth Lars Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Real arrows are longer and not usually with arrow head. Get an arrow of aluminium and cut it in half - it is a thin-walled aluminium tube. I would think that an archer or an archery club would have lots of broken arrows laying around.
    Use a long bolt through a hole in the helmet, with a washer inside washer and nut on the outside. Glue the shaft to the bolt with thickened epoxy or epoxy putty. Then sculpt the arrow head on top of that from scratch. You could also sculpt it so that it looks like there is a crack that opens outwards.

    These days there are also lots of replica military helmets made out of plastic, intended for paintball. Much lighter than old GI helmets and therefore better for costuming. The plastic may vary though: You don't want PE (HDPE, Polyethylene) or PP. If it is made from ABS then you could use solvent-based adhesives for attaching greeblies made of styrene.
     
    Contec likes this.
  17. Jesuit24

    Jesuit24 Active Member

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    I was going to go with wooden dowel for the arrow shaft and use an arrow head from eBay. Since Tank Girl is set post apocalyptic, wood make more sense, I think. Good call on crossbow bolts though. I may look into that.

    As for the helmet, I already have one. A few years ago, I bought parts for a US Airborne helmet and all the spare parts made a B grade helmet, which is what I'm going to use.
     
  18. blue2k

    blue2k Well-Known Member

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    I would use the M1 liner (plastic, so lighter) and epoxy threaded rod into the greeblies. Attach using simple bolts and washers inside the liner.
     

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