Freezing molds

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MoviesColin

New Member
I know that a silicone mold can be frozen and remain flexible...

Can a latex mold be frozen? I know in it's liquid form it can't... But I want to cast something in a latex mold, and I was wondering if I could freeze the latex mold and have it remain flexible.


If I can, does anyone want $15 worth of silicone? lol.
 

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Mannowar

New Member
Yeah, I'm also kinda curious as to why you'd want to freeze the mold... Just running out of garage space and have an empty freezer or what? You making little pred popsicles?
 

Lazrith

New Member
Ahhhh, using the frozen latex as a ridged mold in place of silicone and a plaster hard mold, but as soon as it thaws, you can pull whatever object out without any hastle. Good idea.
 

Mannowar

New Member
Ok... I guess I still don't get this... If you're molding something using Latex as your medium, why not just let it cure naturally? What is the point of freezing? I just keep coming back to this wondering why you would need to freeze it... Secondly, freezing may cause some very odd coagulation in the latex and finally, have you looked into spec sheets to see at what temp latex actually freezes solid. My guess is that the water and ammonia may freeze at 32F, thus ruining the latex and possibly (as mentioned above) causing some weird coagulation, but that the main component itself (everything except the water and ammonia) will require significantly deeper cold to freeze solid... don't know that for sure, but that would be my guess and I can't find an actual freeze point in any of the spec sheets I can find, only warnings against cold weather storage, etc...

But... still really wondering why you need to freeze it. If you let it cure naturally, you're still going to have a flexible mold. Very perplexed!!! lol
 

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SUICIDALRAIDER

New Member
im glad im not the only one...lol... i dont think that amonia freezes just the water. might be wrong on that , not sure though. along with scott i'm :p :p ;)
 

MoviesColin

New Member
Lol, sorry for confusing the hell outta you guys.

The point of freezing a latex mold was a quick attempt for bondo transfers for prosthetics.

You freeze the silicone mold with the bondo (thickened prosaide) in for the casting, then the bondo freezes solid, allowing you to peel away the silicone mold with no damage.

A cured latex mold works the same way, except the bondo doesn't freeze (i'm assuming because of the water content?). So latex molds for prosthetic "Tinsely Transfers" don't work.
 

UNSC Hunter

New Member
I tried this but I dont reccomend it.
I would use a mixture of fiberglass resin and bondo instead.
It makes bondo stronger and makes it more as a liquid so you can easyly pour it into molds.

Like I said I tried it but bondo is just to sticky to spread around, and gives alot of air bubbles to the cast.
 

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ptgreek

Active Member
It's called a prosaide transfer. Prosaide, borax and cabosil are blended together at a low setting then brushed into a mold... Transfer paper is then laid into the mold. You put the mold into the freezer and it gels. The transfer is then removed. It gets applied as a prothstetic using hair dryers and prosaide. 99% alcohol will blend the edges... So funny I'm reading this right now... I just assisted in applying one of these on Orlando Jones not more then an hour ago. ... Waiting for Him to get back from set... I'll see if he is cool with me snapping a pic of the appliance... We did a burn scar for a film he is in called Seconds Apart. My third film in a month here in Louisiana
 

ptgreek

Active Member
Ha.. Totaly, Andy. Orlando is a cool guy. I have the pic, but somehow, I can't copy the image URL with my iPhone. I'll post it up later this week. These pieces are pretty cool. They are best for thin prothstetics, like age wrinkles and scaring
 

ptgreek

Active Member
As promised here is the prosaide transfer prosthetic we did on Orlando. works great for making very thin pieces such as burn scarring in this case

483aceb2.jpg


483aceb2.jpg
 

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