Found! Obi-Wan Kenobi ANH Lightsaber Emitter

PHArchivist

Master Member
In my opinion, Chris is the best nominee for research contacts, as he is the purveyor of the most formalized source for parts of Star Wars, and very experienced in this arena...

Sorry, Chris. :p
 

Prop Runner

Sr Member
Originally posted by vaderdarth@Sep 28 2005, 02:34 PM
Serafino & Gav,

As far as the inner ring not being recessed etc.....what if that inner ring can slide in and out of the sleeve???  That might account for the step.   Also,  we still don't know if there is supposed to be a step there to account for a gasket.
I already addressed this on page 4:

Now, if my interpretation is correct, my cutaway assembly model is missing some sort of sealant material or gasket that accounts for the gap between the connector flanges in Fig. 7, and that creates a press-fit seal between the ring with holes and the inside wall of the connector. However, if that material is pliable, the ring can be pushed into the connector so that it's just underflush, the way we're accustomed to seeing it on the Obi Wan saber emitter.
If you go back and check out my cutaway CAD model, you'll be able to visualize it better. :) The cutaway diagram in Fig. 7 definitely has some sort of sealant material between the oppossing emitter flanges, around the holed rings. I deliberately left it out in order to isolate the parts we're interested in:

- the connector
- the holed ring
- the inner thin-walled tube

[EDIT]: I sent an informed and courteous e-mail to the owner of the gas-turbine website. I'll post what he replies if it's helpful. :)

- Gabe
 

lonepigeon

Sr Member
Originally posted by PHArchivist@Sep 28 2005, 03:20 PM
In my opinion, Chris is the best nominee for research contacts, as he is the purveyor of the most formalized source for parts of Star Wars, and very experienced in this arena...

Sorry, Chris.  :p
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I'm honored. ;)
I'd be willing to do so, but looks liek Gabe's got that lead covered.

I have been sending e-mails to a few other people with no luck yet.

For the record and so we don't duplicate ourselves or bother anyone needlessly I've contacted the following people:
Dr. Van den Bulck at the Museum of Historical Engines
Ben Rogers at flyvintage.com (took cutaway photo on museum's website)

I also sent an e-mail to the general info address at the Duxford Museum (recommended by Mr. Rogers).

I've been cutting to the chase and saying I'm looking for parts. I doubt Dr. Van den Bulck will want to take apart his school's engine for measurements or photos of internal parts.

I sent a pretty simple e-mail and two pics I've been including:
1. Combustion Assembly Interior (the head part by itself)
2. Combustion Chamber Interconnector (diagram)
 

Stormy320

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I'm a IG88 fan here in the States.

I want to build the big boy.

I've been searching for the engine and any information off and on for over a year with no luck. Not saying someone can't do better and it won't be found - but this one will be tough.

We need some help from our UK boys.

Thanks
 

Hermes

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Lonepigeon said - " 60 new-build aircraft to Brazil"


Folks, I LIVE in Brazil. It´s a big country, actually larger than the Continental US, but hey, I live near an Air Base with decomissioned planes (not many, but WHO KNOWS, there COULD be a Derwent there.)

I´ll go there as soon as possible.
 

Prop Runner

Sr Member
Think about it, people...

9 IG88 heads and at least 18 (or 36, if my interpretation of Fig. 7 is correct) OWK emitters per engine... :love

- Gabe
 

Serafino

Sr Member
In case it hasn't already been mentioned--the manual with the exciting illustration is about both the Derwent Mk 5 and 8 engines.
 

Serafino

Sr Member


The blood has drained from my head, I am in complete shock.

I just exchanged emails with an engineer familiar with these engines. I sent him a picture of the Obi emitter with some dimensions, and he said it is indeed a chamber interconnect. And he offered to show me one if I'm in the area.

:eek
 
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lonepigeon

Sr Member
I think I had fixated on the Derwent 8 because it was the only one I had seen the correct IG-88 head in. It could be a manufacturer difference or a changed feature from a later model.

Serafino - that's great.
Now we need some pics/dimensions and actual parts.

Show him the gear too. Maybe this engine will finally finish off the prop.
 

Prop Runner

Sr Member
Originally posted by Serafino@Sep 29 2005, 04:04 AM
In case it hasn't already been mentioned--the manual with the exciting illustration is about both the Derwent Mk 5 and 8 engines.
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And there are also the Mk 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, & 9. Keep in mind that these numbers are nearly always represented by Roman numerals (Mk. I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX). It also wouldn't hurt to ask about the Dewert's predeccessor, the RB.41 Nene and one derivative of the Mk II adapted for turboprops: the Rolls-Royce "Trent" engine. It's safe to assume that many of the same parts are shared by all versions, so in your inquiries, ask about the entire series of engines AND Gloster Meteor planes in all their incarnations: the Meteor I, Meteor Mark III (G-41C), Meteor III, F.4, U.15 (target drone), T.7 (Trainer Mark 7, or G-43), F.8 (G-41K), FR.9 (Fighter Reconnaissance 9, or G-41L), FR.10, and the NF.11, 12, 13, & 14 (Night Fighter).

REMEMBER: YOU WON'T FIND ANY ENGINES UNLESS YOU LOOK FOR THE PLANES...

Here again is the list of countries that operated them and their designatios/configurations:

A total of 1,183 F.8s were built in all by Gloster and Armstrong-Whitworth, with 23 ex-RAF aircraft supplied to Belgium, 60 new-build aircraft to Brazil, 20 new-build aircraft to Denmark, 12 ex-RAF aircraft to Egypt, 11 new-build aircraft to Israel, 5 ex-RAF aircraft to the Netherlands, and 12 new-build and 7 ex-RAF aircraft to Syria.

Fokker built 150 F.8s for the Dutch and 150 F.8s for the Belgians. Avions Fairey built 30 from kits supplied by Fokker and 37 from kits supplied by Gloster, with these aircraft going into Dutch service.

About 250 Meteor F.8s were converted to "U.16" target drones by Flight Refueling LTD, beginning in 1956. The last conversion was apparently in 1975. The Australians received similar conversions with some minor differences in equipment kit as the "U.21".

The U.16 / U.21 conversion was broadly similar to the U.15 conversion, with airframe reinforcement, wingtip camera pods, radio control while retaining piloted capability, and no cannons. However, the U.16 had a characteristic modified extended nose, the camera pods were slenderer, and it is unclear if it had flare dispensers. These machines remained in service into the 1990s, and a few may be flying yet.

A total of 126 FR.9s were built and went into RAF service in the low-altitude reconnaissance role, with 12 of these aircraft later passed on to Ecuador, 7 passed on to Israel, and two passed on to Syria. RAF Meteor PR.9s saw extensive use in the 1956 Suez intervention, and Middle Eastern Meteors of various types saw intermittent combat through the 1950s.

The "PR.10 (G-41M)" was intended for the high-altitude reconnaissance role. It not only had the older long-span wing, it also had the older elliptical Meteor F.4 tail. Armament was deleted, and it was fitted both with a camera in the nose as with the FR.9 and wth two cameras in the rear fuselage for along-track imaging. The RAF received 59 PR.10s. None were exported.

The first production NF.11, with a proper Meteor F.8 tail, flew on 13 November 1950, and 307 production NF.11s were built. The Danes bought 11, the Belgians obtained 24 ex-RAF aircraft, somewhat surprisingly the French bought 41 used RAF NF.11s, and a single example was sent to Australia.

The NF.11 was followed by the "NF.13" and "NF.12", in that order, with the reversal of the numeric sequence apparently due to the fact that the NF.13 revision was started later than the NF.12 but, being a more modest upgrade, was completed sooner. All the Meteor night fighter variants retained the "G.47" company designation.

In fact, the NF.13 was largely identical to the NF.11, except that it had a radio compass, cockpit cooling ducts, and other changes for tropical operation, and larger intakes to improve air mass flow to the engines, resulting in 45 kilograms (100 pounds) more thrust. The first NF.13 flew on 23 December 1952, and 40 were built.

The NF.12 featured Derwent 9 engines with 16.9 kN (1,725 kgp / 3,800 lbf) thrust each, and the nose lengthened by 43 centimeters (17 inches) to accommodate improved American Westinghouse AN/APS-21 radar. The top half of the vertical tailplane was enlarged to compensate for the longer nose, giving the tailplane a slightly crooked appearance.

The first NF.12 flew on 21 April 1953, with 100 being built. France obtained two for test purposes, and six each ex-RAF aircraft were provided to Egypt, Syria, and Israel.

The "NF.14" was generally similar to the NF.12, but featured a "blown" clear-vision canopy to provide a much-improved view compared to the old framed canopy; improved US AN/APQ-43 radar and an even longer nose; yaw dampers to control "snaking"; and other lesser changes. 100 NF.14s were manufactured, and were the last Meteors built, with the very last of the breed delivered on 26 May 1955.

The Meteor night fighters remained in front-line RAF service until 1961. The total number of Meteor night-fighters built by Armstrong-Whitworth was 547.

Some of the NF.14s were later converted to "NF(T).14" navigation trainers. Others were modified as target tugs, with a windmill-powered winch mounted inboard of the right engine, and were designated "TT.20". The TT.20s remained in service with the RAF at least into the 1970s.

A total of almost 4,000 Meteors was built in all, and the type served with ten air forces. The following table gives Meteor variants and their production quantities. The quantities tend to be somewhat difficult to pin down precisely since it is unclear in many cases whether prototype builds are counted as part of the total, but should be in the ballpark.




The Dewert engines were also used as runway de-icers, which of course will not apply to countries like Australia, Egypt, Brazil, or Israel. ;)

Let the hunt begin. :D

- Gabe
 

Prop Runner

Sr Member
Originally posted by Serafino@Sep 29 2005, 04:45 AM



The blood has drained from my head, I am in complete shock.

I just exchanged emails with an engineer familiar with these engines.  I sent him a picture of the Obi emitter with some dimensions, and he said it is indeed a chamber interconnect.  And he offered to show me one if I'm in the area.

                  :eek
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Damn, I love being right. B) Way to go, Serafino. :thumbsup

With 3,924 Meteors built, conservatively assuming 5% of them escaped scrapping or display in some museum, we could be looking at hypothetically 196 planes with 392 engines, which translates into 3,528 IG88 heads and...

14,112 interconnectors. :eek

In an ideal world, of course. But at a very conservative 5% survival rate, these planes and their engines CAN be found and salvaged...

- Gabe
 

Sporak

Sr Member
Gone but not forgotten.
WOWZERS...............
Ok, Now I have to get a cup of coffee and settle in a bit...
We're finally going to know exactly what this piece looks like...
Oh My.
 
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Serafino

Sr Member
Well, there is one little itty bitty problem. I'm not "in the area". But I've written back and will look into the options.

I need an emergency RPF research grant :lol
 
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