Fallout Radiation King Radio (Functional).

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


Jenster97

New Member
Hello everyone! My name is Jen and greetings from Malaysia! This thread is about the building process of my Fallout Radiation King radio. The inspiration came recently when I suddenly got hooked on to the old vintage music akin to that from the Fallout series and I happened to stumble upon some papercraft builds of the radio and I thought, why not go ahead with making a (not exactly fully) functional vintage radio ala Fallout style. A little bit of myself before i go ahead with the build, I am currently a Year 3 Electrical and Electronics Engineering student and was heavily into prop making back in 2012 to about 2015 then college came and I slowly grew out of it and slowly lost passion to continue. I have an inactive facebook page which has pictures of a few of my props that I have built over the years as well as a Halo Spartan build thread on the 405th. Currently I found a bit of time to try to get back to what I used to enjoy doing, as I am on a break before I am heading over to the UK to further my studies. Most of my time now has been allocated to the Formula Student team in my current university. Well, that's enough of that, time to get on with the build!
If you are interested, here are the links to my page and thread

FB Page
-->Vista Props
405th link
--> Halo 4 Spartan Build-First Suit ever built by me! (WIP and might be PIC Heavy)

Woodworking and Dimensions
The first step that was done was to select the wood that i would be using. I am not very familiar with the type of wood that i have used, but it was from a 50-year-old cupboard that I have recently disposed off but have kept some of the wooden planks from it. Unfortunately, pictures of measuring and the cutting of wood was somehow not saved in my phone after going into the camera app from the lock screen, what a bummer. Anyway, the dimensions of the radio are as follows with wooden planks of 11mm thickness

YC01KYF.jpg


To sum it up, the general size of the radio is 300mm X 200mm X 140mm

CAD and 3D Printing

Now that I have the general size of the radio all done, it was time to design the front face of the radio. I took the route of CAD-ing the front face as I plan to 3D print it. The modelling was done by referring to images online to help me with my design. Special shoutout to users reedfranklin, replicaprops and fenruul as I used a lot of their images as reference when designing the face. As there are little to no build on the Fallout radio, my resources were limited and had to make do with what I had. From here on out its all eyeball work and estimations to get the dimensions and scaling as accurate as I like relative to the size of my planned dimensions. The software I use is Solidworks, which most of my Mechanical Engineering buddies used and are familiar with and I able to get some help from them when modelling should I need any.

RZiLvM3.jpg


eyewpHn.png


The inner mechanism of the radio is from a cheap bluetooth speaker. I initially planned to have the radio as realistic as possible where the knobs had functions like controlling the volume as such. After looking at the circuit board of the speaker, it was damn near impossible to find the part of the IC which has the volume control, moreover it uses a micro switch to digitaly increase the volume as opposed to the older one which uses a regular potentiometer. To stick to the authenticity of the radio, I still went ahead with adding knobs to it, just that it doesn't have any function to them.

5pdEyCx.png


Upon completing the modelling of the knobs and the radio face, it was time to 3D print them. For the radio face, considering that its dimensions are quirte large, I chose to print the entire thing in one piece instead of separating them into different pieces to that I dont have to spend so much time on cleanup work when assembling. This was done by using the 3D printers available in my university, and the specific model of printer is the Raise3D N2 Plus, with a build volume of 305mm X 305mm X 610mm. Below shows the printed radio face,

TlCBfso.jpg


zLN8Bni.jpg


QupSnUS.jpg


The wooden planks were clamped together after gluing with the printed face clamped together to ensure that the wooden planks are straight and angled properly relative to the shape of the face.
H44Uvgq.jpg


As for the knobs, they were printed using my cheap printer, which you can tell by the difference in print quality hahaha XD

WG6Tlcz.jpg


n8qHrTB.jpg


The annoying part comes after printing to smoothen out the print lines of the parts. One of the easy way that I found to smoothen out the top surface really easily is by using superglue as the gap and ridges are minimal. Once dried, I used 240 grit sandpaper to knock it down and the process is repeated. Superglue is used to fill slightly deeper gaps, then high filler primer is used to fill in smaller holes and gaps. After that it is the same process of filling and sanding for the next few hours. After that, the parts were painted and test fitted together to ensure proper fitment.

pfN8Nnv.jpg


yNbk9yy.jpg


wMH2LxA.jpg


spAW4mn.jpg


Some Assembly

Once that was done, the main wooden portion of the radio was being worked on. All 4 wooden planks were glues and clamped together with the printed face to make sure that they are always straight.

tAZD38y.jpg


g9cBQ0G.jpg


y52w8XA.jpg


3WqW32z.jpg


Les8vLz.jpg


PyxA9Pv.jpg


Edit 18/01/20: corrected sentences and typo errors
 
Last edited:

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

GhostMinion

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Great build. Excited to see the results.

But............

Is there really a need for three threads for this build? Perhaps you may consider having the mods merge the three into one thread? It would be much easier for us to follow. ;)



Edit: Well, now I'm only seeing two threads. Maybe one has already been merged? :confused
 

Jenster97

New Member
My apologies, I seem to have a lot of problem with my thread. I only have one thread up on this build. Problems include missing pictures, text, images turning into a wall of gibberish text and like you said, multiple threads on the same build. Hopefully I am able to sort it out
 

GhostMinion

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
My apologies, I seem to have a lot of problem with my thread. I only have one thread up on this build. Problems include missing pictures, text, images turning into a wall of gibberish text and like you said, multiple threads on the same build. Hopefully I am able to sort it out


Right on. Just the same, can't wait to see your finished result. Lookin' good so far. :thumbsup
 

Jenster97

New Member
Update 12/05/2018


Electronic Components

This section covers all the inner electronics which makes this radio work. The main electronic components which makes up the radio is from a cheap Bluetooth speaker that also supports AUX and an SD card slot, which I have gotten from a lucky draw prize. The Bluetooth speaker itself runs on a 3.7V 200mAh Lithium Polymer battery and can be recharged with a normal Micro USB cable. The main modifications I did to the speaker itself was extending the wires for the speaker from the main board, extending the wires from the board to the switch and adding a DC jacks for the battery, to allow easy connection/disconnection.







Initially, I planned to have just a printed dial for the radio. After pondering about it for a bit, I decided that I needed to make it more authentic in a sense where the needle for the dial is movable and there will be LEDs to light up the face of the dial. To control the needle of the dial, I decided to use the previously non-functional potentiometer for the knobs to control the needle of the dial. The first thing I did was to search for a cheap analogue voltmeter/ammeter to gut its internals to be used for the dial mechanism but they were hard to find, some were expensive, and the others' assembly was too large to be fitted into my radio. Therefore, I improvised by just using a servo motor to control the movement of the needle. Some of you might consider it extremely inefficient but then again it is just for the fun of it which adds to the 'experience'

To make things easier, I have gone with the route of using a cheap knock-off Arduino Nano to be used to control the servo motor and the LEDs. All of these components would be also powered by the same 3.7V LiPo battery. Since the servo motor draws quite a bit of current, I ended up purchasing a 1000mAh one. I added a switch for the Arduino side of things so that I am able to turn of the 'less important' mechanism of the radio should I run low on battery.





As for the LEDs, they are soldered on to a perfboard, and as you can see I got a little bit carried away with solder traces.





The LED board is then glued onto the back of the dial face that i have stuck onto a piece of acrylic, and have been frosted by sanding it with 240 grit sandpaper to help with the light diffusion. Pardon the horrible looking mounts. I didn't really make much measurements and just went with it and improvised along the way heh.







 
Last edited:

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Jenster97

New Member
Update 13/05/2018


Dial Mechanism
Now that I have don’t the face of the dial, it was time for me to build the mechanism which causes it to rotate. As I am using a servo for the needle movement, I would need a part which can fit onto the servo and allows a needle to sit on. Easiest way? 3D printing of course! The needle holder is friction fitted onto the servo and no screws or bolts needed to secure it.
Ts7tHxg.png



The needle epoxied to the holder
F8JuFxs.jpg



dBa32FO.jpg


Holder painted

wuYlez8.jpg



4DGtMh6.jpg


Right after that, I installed an acrylic screen for the dial. I did not go with the route of epoxy or superglue. Since the screen is held in place mostly by friction, a slightly weaker adhesive can be used to prevent it from moving. Funny enough I stumbled upon this tube of UV-activated glue which is almost crystal clear and pretty cheap plus it has less mess than using superglue or epoxy.
E0S1LeX.jpg



If0cMAA.jpg



The dial face and needle after being attached behind the face of the radio.
LL8sWmm.jpg


Testing video:
 

Attachments

  • Ts7tHxg.png
    Ts7tHxg.png
    269.3 KB · Views: 55
  • Ts7tHxg.png
    Ts7tHxg.png
    269.3 KB · Views: 80
  • Ts7tHxg.png
    Ts7tHxg.png
    269.3 KB · Views: 59
  • F8JuFxs.jpg
    F8JuFxs.jpg
    1.1 MB · Views: 61
  • F8JuFxs.jpg
    F8JuFxs.jpg
    1.1 MB · Views: 59
  • dBa32FO.jpg
    dBa32FO.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 43
  • dBa32FO.jpg
    dBa32FO.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 59
  • F8JuFxs.jpg
    F8JuFxs.jpg
    1.1 MB · Views: 60
  • dBa32FO.jpg
    dBa32FO.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 51
  • wuYlez8.jpg
    wuYlez8.jpg
    853.3 KB · Views: 46
  • wuYlez8.jpg
    wuYlez8.jpg
    853.3 KB · Views: 48
  • wuYlez8.jpg
    wuYlez8.jpg
    853.3 KB · Views: 44
  • 4DGtMh6.jpg
    4DGtMh6.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 42
  • 4DGtMh6.jpg
    4DGtMh6.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 50
  • 4DGtMh6.jpg
    4DGtMh6.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 45
  • E0S1LeX.jpg
    E0S1LeX.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 52
  • E0S1LeX.jpg
    E0S1LeX.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 53
  • E0S1LeX.jpg
    E0S1LeX.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 54
  • If0cMAA.jpg
    If0cMAA.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 49
  • If0cMAA.jpg
    If0cMAA.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 64
  • If0cMAA.jpg
    If0cMAA.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 60
  • LL8sWmm.jpg
    LL8sWmm.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 63
  • LL8sWmm.jpg
    LL8sWmm.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 50
  • LL8sWmm.jpg
    LL8sWmm.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 54
  • Ts7tHxg.png
    Ts7tHxg.png
    269.3 KB · Views: 57
  • F8JuFxs.jpg
    F8JuFxs.jpg
    1.1 MB · Views: 56
  • dBa32FO.jpg
    dBa32FO.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 52
  • wuYlez8.jpg
    wuYlez8.jpg
    853.3 KB · Views: 57
  • 4DGtMh6.jpg
    4DGtMh6.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 54
  • E0S1LeX.jpg
    E0S1LeX.jpg
    2.7 MB · Views: 54
  • If0cMAA.jpg
    If0cMAA.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 43
  • LL8sWmm.jpg
    LL8sWmm.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 53
Last edited by a moderator:

Jenster97

New Member
Thank you very much! Yes I have seen the dial you shared, but somehow it was in another thread of the same name and I am not sure how did that happen. A few days back I also had trouble posting comments, pictures as well as editing posts.
 

Jenster97

New Member
Final Update 21/5/2018
This will be the final post as I have finally finished the radio! Unfortunately, the 3.7V LiPo battery used to power the dial mechanism and the Bluetooth is not very sufficient. When the speaker is playing music while the microcontroller which controls the dial servo is on, the needle would fluctuate based on the music XD. Hopefully in the future I would be able to find another easily rechargable battery for the dial mechanism. Nevertheless, the entire radio is working as intended, if you don't include the minor hiccups. Then again, the dial has no functional purpose other than to give it some extra 'realism'. Anyway, the pictures below are the final few pictures which shows the finishing touches to complete the radio.

X6Amten.jpg

yGjFDvt.jpg

BHiqiR8.jpg

gaM4WlM.jpg

UYegOX3.jpg

hVvkB4z.jpg

fvAiW9J.jpg

pdw0Exr.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top